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(Yahoo)   ♫ In the middle of the earth in the land of Shire ♫ Lives a brave little hobbit whom we all admire ♫ With his long wooden pipe ♫ Fuzzy, woolly toes ♫ He lives in a hobbit-hole and conquers goblins and orcs because he gets lots of Vitamin D ♫   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 22
    More: Interesting, vitamin D, Gollum, wooden pipes, U.S. Pacific Fleet, midgets, hobbits, oily fish  
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1840 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Dec 2013 at 3:37 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



22 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-12-16 01:14:29 AM  
Kim Kardashian not available for comment.
 
2013-12-16 05:06:28 AM  
[Scientific-Efficacy-Chart.png]
 
2013-12-16 05:53:43 AM  
I read that in the trilly voice of the Rankin & Bass singer.
 
2013-12-16 06:30:47 AM  
Well... yeah.  That was Tolkien's actual thesis, that industrialization was bad and would deprive us of things we needed physically and spiritually.
 
2013-12-16 07:04:22 AM  

Jim_Callahan: Well... yeah.  That was Tolkien's actual thesis, that industrialization was bad and would deprive us of things we needed physically and spiritually.


Actually, Tolkien explicitly denied that Lord of the Rings was an allegory with any specific intended message or meaning.

"I cordially dislike allegory in all its manifestations, and always have done so since I grew old and wary enough to detect its presence. I much prefer history - true or feigned- with its varied applicability to the thought and experience of readers. I think that many confuse applicability with allegory, but the one resides in the freedom of the reader, and the other in the purposed domination of the author."
 -JRR Tolkien
 
2013-12-16 07:11:23 AM  

Doc Daneeka: "I cordially dislike allegory in all its manifestations, and always have done so since I grew old and wary enough to detect its presence. I much prefer history - true or feigned- with its varied applicability to the thought and experience of readers. I think that many confuse applicability with allegory, but the one resides in the freedom of the reader, and the other in the purposed domination of the author."
-JRR Tolkien


He was clearly referring to Communism and the eventual fall of the Berlin Wall.
 
2013-12-16 07:20:30 AM  

Jim_Callahan: Well... yeah.  That was Tolkien's actual thesis, that industrialization was bad and would deprive us of things we needed physically and spiritually.


he didn't seem to mind all those industrial printers that produced his books in huge numbers though, did he?
 
2013-12-16 07:26:50 AM  
FTA "They scoured "The Hobbit" for references to characters' living conditions, habits and diet."

So they could have a realistic data set to work from.
 
2013-12-16 08:16:31 AM  
Wow an article about the hobbit. While a movie based on the book is in theaters. Almost like some sort of advertisement for the movie. How does yahoo even exist anymore if this is the type of shiat they "publish"?
 
2013-12-16 10:16:49 AM  
You can clearly tell from Sam and Frodo that Hobbits got plenty of the D.
 
2013-12-16 10:27:01 AM  

Jim_Callahan: Well... yeah.  That was Tolkien's actual thesis, that industrialization was bad and would deprive us of things we needed physically and spiritually.


That was also a clear demonstration of "I have too much time on my hands and too much hair, also."
 
2013-12-16 11:44:51 AM  

Doc Daneeka: Jim_Callahan: Well... yeah.  That was Tolkien's actual thesis, that industrialization was bad and would deprive us of things we needed physically and spiritually.

Actually, Tolkien explicitly denied that Lord of the Rings was an allegory with any specific intended message or meaning.

"I cordially dislike allegory in all its manifestations, and always have done so since I grew old and wary enough to detect its presence. I much prefer history - true or feigned- with its varied applicability to the thought and experience of readers. I think that many confuse applicability with allegory, but the one resides in the freedom of the reader, and the other in the purposed domination of the author."
 -JRR Tolkien


Your a bit slow with the reading comprehension there eh? Nevermind. Here this question may help thesis:tolkien::allegory:( ).
Anyways that theme Jim mentioned is common to most sci-fi. Harkens back to Thoreau and the like.
Back to tfa, tfa was both garbage science and garbage fanfic. It makes me want to poop. So at least its a decent laxative, right? Thats something at least.
 
2013-12-16 11:51:15 AM  

AgentPothead: Wow an article about the hobbit. While a movie based on the book is in theaters. Almost like some sort of advertisement for the movie. How does yahoo even exist anymore if this is the type of shiat they "publish"?


Look at you being all edgy and cynical.
 
2013-12-16 12:49:39 PM  

Cucullen: Doc Daneeka: Jim_Callahan: Well... yeah.  That was Tolkien's actual thesis, that industrialization was bad and would deprive us of things we needed physically and spiritually.

Actually, Tolkien explicitly denied that Lord of the Rings was an allegory with any specific intended message or meaning.

"I cordially dislike allegory in all its manifestations, and always have done so since I grew old and wary enough to detect its presence. I much prefer history - true or feigned- with its varied applicability to the thought and experience of readers. I think that many confuse applicability with allegory, but the one resides in the freedom of the reader, and the other in the purposed domination of the author."
 -JRR Tolkien

Your a bit slow with the reading comprehension there eh? Nevermind. Here this question may help thesis:tolkien::allegory:( ).
Anyways that theme Jim mentioned is common to most sci-fi. Harkens back to Thoreau and the like.
Back to tfa, tfa was both garbage science and garbage fanfic. It makes me want to poop. So at least its a decent laxative, right? Thats something at least.


???

Jim Callahan was describing Lord of the Rings/The Hobbit as an allegory.  An allegory is a piece of fiction in which the entire work is an extended metaphor, intended by the author to convey some particular message about his world.  Jim was asserting that the message (or "thesis" in his words) of LotR was "industrialization was bad and would deprive us of things we needed physically and spiritually."

I was merely pointing out that Tolkien expressly denied that there was any such authorial message in LotR and insisted that the work was not meant allegorically.  Any "theses" that readers have detected are there own interpretations.

That's not to say there aren't themes relating to modernity, industry, and nature in the work.  But Tolkien didn't intend to convey some explicit thesis such as that.  He was just writing histories and mythologies that he left for others to interpret how they will.
 
2013-12-16 02:15:21 PM  
Possesion of the One Ring is greater than vitamin D.
 
2013-12-16 02:17:43 PM  

Doc Daneeka: Cucullen: Doc Daneeka: Jim_Callahan: Well... yeah.  That was Tolkien's actual thesis, that industrialization was bad and would deprive us of things we needed physically and spiritually.

Actually, Tolkien explicitly denied that Lord of the Rings was an allegory with any specific intended message or meaning.

"I cordially dislike allegory in all its manifestations, and always have done so since I grew old and wary enough to detect its presence. I much prefer history - true or feigned- with its varied applicability to the thought and experience of readers. I think that many confuse applicability with allegory, but the one resides in the freedom of the reader, and the other in the purposed domination of the author."
 -JRR Tolkien

Your a bit slow with the reading comprehension there eh? Nevermind. Here this question may help thesis:tolkien::allegory:( ).
Anyways that theme Jim mentioned is common to most sci-fi. Harkens back to Thoreau and the like.
Back to tfa, tfa was both garbage science and garbage fanfic. It makes me want to poop. So at least its a decent laxative, right? Thats something at least.

???

Jim Callahan was describing Lord of the Rings/The Hobbit as an allegory.  An allegory is a piece of fiction in which the entire work is an extended metaphor, intended by the author to convey some particular message about his world.  Jim was asserting that the message (or "thesis" in his words) of LotR was "industrialization was bad and would deprive us of things we needed physically and spiritually."

I was merely pointing out that Tolkien expressly denied that there was any such authorial message in LotR and insisted that the work was not meant allegorically.  Any "theses" that readers have detected are there own interpretations.

That's not to say there aren't themes relating to modernity, industry, and nature in the work.  But Tolkien didn't intend to convey some explicit thesis such as that.  He was just writing histories and mythologies that he left for others ...


The best allegories are often unintentional.
 
2013-12-16 02:47:18 PM  
That's why Melkor was unable to create life on his own.  It's not that he didn't have the same demiurgic power of Illuvatar, he just didn't have a degree in biochemistry.
 
2013-12-16 02:54:23 PM  
This is bullshiat.

Elves and dwarves existed for many thousands of years before there was a Sun.

During the First Age, the light of the Two Trees did not extend to Middle Earth.  The elves who did not migrate to Valinor (the Avari) and the dwarves seemed to thrive despite the lack of sunlight.

Even after the creation of the Sun and Moon, the dwarves dwelt mostly underground, and therefore likely did not require sunlight for vitamin D synthesis.

It is generally accepted that orcs were bred from elves captured by Morgoth in the First Age before they were discovered by Oromë, and were corrupted in the pits of Angband.  As their genetic stock is elven, orcs would not have required sunlight for vitamin D synthesis either.

Humans awoke with the creation of the Sun.  Hobbits are a subspecies of human, so the article's theory could apply to Gollum.  Interestingly, one dietary source of vitamin D is oily fish or fish liver oil.  This may explain Gollum's craving for fish.


img.fark.net

i.imgur.com
 
2013-12-16 03:05:34 PM  

Doc Daneeka: Cucullen: Doc Daneeka: Jim_Callahan: Well... yeah.  That was Tolkien's actual thesis, that industrialization was bad and would deprive us of things we needed physically and spiritually.

Actually, Tolkien explicitly denied that Lord of the Rings was an allegory with any specific intended message or meaning.

"I cordially dislike allegory in all its manifestations, and always have done so since I grew old and wary enough to detect its presence. I much prefer history - true or feigned- with its varied applicability to the thought and experience of readers. I think that many confuse applicability with allegory, but the one resides in the freedom of the reader, and the other in the purposed domination of the author."
 -JRR Tolkien

Your a bit slow with the reading comprehension there eh? Nevermind. Here this question may help thesis:tolkien::allegory:( ).
Anyways that theme Jim mentioned is common to most sci-fi. Harkens back to Thoreau and the like.
Back to tfa, tfa was both garbage science and garbage fanfic. It makes me want to poop. So at least its a decent laxative, right? Thats something at least.

???

Jim Callahan was describing Lord of the Rings/The Hobbit as an allegory.  An allegory is a piece of fiction in which the entire work is an extended metaphor, intended by the author to convey some particular message about his world.  Jim was asserting that the message (or "thesis" in his words) of LotR was "industrialization was bad and would deprive us of things we needed physically and spiritually."

I was merely pointing out that Tolkien expressly denied that there was any such authorial message in LotR and insisted that the work was not meant allegorically.  Any "theses" that readers have detected are there own interpretations.

That's not to say there aren't themes relating to modernity, industry, and nature in the work.  But Tolkien didn't intend to convey some explicit thesis such as that.  He was just writing histories and mythologies that he left for others ...


Shame on you for setting an ignorant tree hugger straight with facts. Not very farkish of you.
 
2013-12-16 10:44:49 PM  

AgentPothead: Wow an article about the hobbit. While a movie based on the book is in theaters. Almost like some sort of advertisement for the movie. How does yahoo even exist anymore if this is the type of shiat they "publish"?


Actually, more likely an advertisement for the study. Like the UK researchers who recently discovered that James Bond should be face-down in a ditch somewhere instead of globe-hoppingly saving the world. Researchers do what they can to attract relevance to their fields, including pop-cultural references.

Unless you wanna pop up a thatsthejoke.jpg, which is cool with me.
 
2013-12-16 11:45:47 PM  

Doc Daneeka: Jim Callahan was describing Lord of the Rings/The Hobbit as an allegory.  An allegory is a piece of fiction in which the entire work is an extended metaphor, intended by the author to convey some particular message about his world.  Jim was asserting that the message (or "thesis" in his words) of LotR was "industrialization was bad and would deprive us of things we needed physically and spiritually."

I was merely pointing out that Tolkien expressly denied that there was any such authorial message in LotR and insisted that the work was not meant allegorically.  Any "theses" that readers have detected are there own interpretations.


Well, two points:

Firstly, a work doesn't need to be allegorical to have a thesis, and in this case it wasn't metaphorical: the orcs (and, more generally, Mordor) have an industrial civilization.  It makes everything a wasteland.  They are cut off from nature, and evil without exception.  That's an explicit message, not really a metaphor.

Secondly, what Tolkien was denying specifically in that quote was the accusation that the work was  political allegory, or allegorical of  recent European history.  Given that he was a professor of literature among other things, he would probably object to your interpretation that would conclude that the old legends he was basing most of the work on didn't have any sort of moral or message.

Bonus point for extra credit: if you have to both twist the definition of a common literary analysis term to make it broader than it generally is in typical usage,  and you have to cherry pick a quote and misinterpret the context to make your point, then your point might not be a very good one.  Just sayin'.
 
2013-12-17 01:33:10 AM  
College students from England: the same people who finally answered the question that was way to perplexing, even for Mr. Owl and allowed that poor narrator to die a happy man: 3,481. It takes 3,481 licks.

And I checked everywhere for a secondary source on that statistic, but all I can find are tertiaries - Wikipedia, WolframAlpha, references to it in non-dedicated blog post, etc. So, here's the best I got:

http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=How+many+licks+does+it+take+to+ ge t+to+the+tootsie+roll+center+of+a+tootsie+pop%3F
 
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