If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Salon)   Have you donated money to your alma mater instead of to the poor? If so, you're a bad person and should feel bad about yourself   (salon.com) divider line 121
    More: Asinine, tax year, Ivy Leagues, corporate lawyers, art museums, wealths, Head Start, business schools  
•       •       •

3701 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Dec 2013 at 9:00 PM (32 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



121 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-12-14 08:15:53 PM
Meh, my alma mater took a chance on me, gave me a profession. The poor never did that for me.
 
2013-12-14 08:24:19 PM
But a large portion of the charitable deductions now claimed by America's wealthy are for donations to culture palaces - operas, art museums, symphonies, and theaters - where they spend their leisure time hobnobbing with other wealthy benefactors.

Because only the 1% attend the opera, theater, symphony, or museums, and these "cultural palaces" only enrich the wealthy, the public doesn't benefit from them in any way.  Was Salon always this bad?
 
2013-12-14 08:36:56 PM
The only two charities that I have donated in any significant quantity weren't food related. One was a Civil War Trust and the other was MADD. My amounts added to a bit over $500 for both; $400 for the civil war trust and $100 for MADD. However I doubt Salon would consider me a bad person for not servicing the poor because I am not rich and Salon REALLY hates rich people.
 
2013-12-14 09:06:51 PM
Have you donated money to your alma mater instead of to the poor?

Yes I have. And fark you.
 
2013-12-14 09:08:04 PM
Fark It:
Because only the 1% attend the opera, theater, symphony, or museums, and these "cultural palaces" only enrich the wealthy, the public doesn't benefit from them in any way. Was Salon always this bad?

I think the implication is that their donations are to a great extent self-serving.  While I am what is typically called a "raging Bolshie", I don't think that is necessarily accurate.  Much (but certainly not all) of history's great art was supported by rich patrons, sometimes selfishly, sometimes not.
 
2013-12-14 09:08:09 PM

Sensei Can You See: Have you donated money to your alma mater instead of to the poor?

Yes I have. And fark you.

 
2013-12-14 09:08:56 PM
There will come a time when the outrage is so high that all it takes is one push too far, like when the LAPD went to South Central LA to mess around right after the Rodney King verdict and set off several days of riots, and all Hell is going to break loose.

It was be horrible, it will be ugly, and the rich will wish they had never been born.
 
2013-12-14 09:10:18 PM

Fark It: But a large portion of the charitable deductions now claimed by America's wealthy are for donations to culture palaces - operas, art museums, symphonies, and theaters - where they spend their leisure time hobnobbing with other wealthy benefactors.

Because only the 1% attend the opera, theater, symphony, or museums, and these "cultural palaces" only enrich the wealthy, the public doesn't benefit from them in any way.  Was Salon always this bad?


Uh huh. We see single mothers working two Walmart jobs at the opera at least once a week.

Shut up, ass. (SLAP!)
 
2013-12-14 09:11:59 PM
I didn't give to either. I did offer the Salvation Army Santa a dollar to stop ringing that stinking bell long enough for me to walk by.
 
2013-12-14 09:13:34 PM
The kids graduating from my alma mater are poor, generally, by the time they graduate.  I give money so that they can have scholarships and be less poor.

I realize the whole system is robbery, but you could say the same thing about the one that makes people on-the-street poor.
 
2013-12-14 09:13:44 PM
I love my alma mater. Even though it was a huge public university, I loved my teachers, I learned a lot, made awesome friends, got set up well for law school, and had an absolute blast.

Then they spent $32,000 inviting Snooki for a 2 hour question and answer question.

I still love the place, but they're not getting my cash with moves like that.
 
2013-12-14 09:14:09 PM
What if you donated to your alma mater to support education there for the poor?
 
2013-12-14 09:14:13 PM
I give to the Salvation Army. I'm donating jack to my alma mater till I'm done paying off my student loans.
 
2013-12-14 09:15:04 PM

Fark It: But a large portion of the charitable deductions now claimed by America's wealthy are for donations to culture palaces - operas, art museums, symphonies, and theaters - where they spend their leisure time hobnobbing with other wealthy benefactors.

Because only the 1% attend the opera, theater, symphony, or museums, and these "cultural palaces" only enrich the wealthy, the public doesn't benefit from them in any way.  Was Salon always this bad?



Yeah, as someone who has given money to such things I will admit that the reasons for that kind of giving tend to be less purely altruistic (there tend to be more perks associated with it), but it does benefit society as a whole and those donations are a big part of making those benefits available to people who *aren't* the 1%.

/I also think that a basic safety net should be a governmental function
 
2013-12-14 09:15:10 PM

No Such Agency: Fark It:
Because only the 1% attend the opera, theater, symphony, or museums, and these "cultural palaces" only enrich the wealthy, the public doesn't benefit from them in any way. Was Salon always this bad?

I think the implication is that their donations are to a great extent self-serving.  While I am what is typically called a "raging Bolshie", I don't think that is necessarily accurate.  Much (but certainly not all) of history's great art was supported by rich patrons, sometimes selfishly, sometimes not.


I think it's BS, and I'm kind of shocked that it would come from somebody with Reich's background.  I know he's left of center, but that argument, about "cultural palaces" as playgrounds for the 1%, is a bunch of Marxist bullshiat.  The arts, our museums, they are society's treasures, they are some of our greatest resources.  Who cares whether or not the rich support the arts selfishly or selflessly?  At the end of the day society (all 100% of it) benefits.
 
2013-12-14 09:20:27 PM

TV's Vinnie: Fark It: But a large portion of the charitable deductions now claimed by America's wealthy are for donations to culture palaces - operas, art museums, symphonies, and theaters - where they spend their leisure time hobnobbing with other wealthy benefactors.

Because only the 1% attend the opera, theater, symphony, or museums, and these "cultural palaces" only enrich the wealthy, the public doesn't benefit from them in any way.  Was Salon always this bad?

Uh huh. We see single mothers working two Walmart jobs at the opera at least once a week.

Shut up, ass. (SLAP!)


You don't need to be wealthy, or even well-off or comfortable to enjoy things like the opera.

http://www.metoperafamily.org/en/news-and-features1/press-releases/r el eases/Free-Summer-Events/

http://www.lyricopera.org/pressroom/millennium-park-2013.aspx
 
2013-12-14 09:20:33 PM
I have never even remotely understood giving money to a school i graduated from. To me it was a social and financial contract between the institutions and myself. When i graduated the contract was ended.

I can see giving money for scholorships for the needy, etc... but general alumi donations? Nope.
 
2013-12-14 09:22:03 PM
bbsimg.ngfiles.com
 
2013-12-14 09:26:28 PM

TV's Vinnie: There will come a time when the outrage is so high that all it takes is one push too far, like when the LAPD went to South Central LA to mess around right after the Rodney King verdict and set off several days of riots, and all Hell is going to break loose.

It was be horrible, it will be ugly, and the rich will wish they had never been born.


Any day now, I'm sure you and the other revolutionaries will wipe the Cheetos off your mugs, lumber out of your parents basements, and take vengeance on the plutocrats who have inflicted such great injustice upon you. Unless there's something good on.
 
2013-12-14 09:28:21 PM
I'll just spend it on hookers and blow to be safe. Thanks Salon!
 
2013-12-14 09:30:03 PM
i.imgur.com
 
2013-12-14 09:33:23 PM
Isn't higher education and the arts important too? Fancy-pants operas, plays, and galleries are important for society too.

How about we just donate to whatever social issue we see fit and more importantly:  img.fark.net
 
2013-12-14 09:34:04 PM

twistedmetal: Meh, my alma mater took a chance on me, gave me a profession. The poor never did that for me.


giving back to people that gave to you isn't charity. That's the retarded mistake Romney made. He called handing wealth to an already wealthy and corrupt political organization guised as a church, "charity." Not being able to even grasp what charity is, is one of the many, many reasons the stupid, grotesque and ignorant assholes that define the right wing are losing ground, and by god they should. What shiatty, dishonest, stupid people.
 
2013-12-14 09:34:20 PM

Debeo Summa Credo: TV's Vinnie: There will come a time when the outrage is so high that all it takes is one push too far, like when the LAPD went to South Central LA to mess around right after the Rodney King verdict and set off several days of riots, and all Hell is going to break loose.

It was be horrible, it will be ugly, and the rich will wish they had never been born.

Any day now, I'm sure you and the other revolutionaries will wipe the Cheetos off your mugs, lumber out of your parents basements, and take vengeance on the plutocrats who have inflicted such great injustice upon you. Unless there's something good on.


I don't think you should be so casually contemptuous. Revolutions do happen. On the other hand, in order to happen, there has to be a significant number of people who are potential generals, CEOs and the like but who are frozen out of the existing power structure. If a society becomes too far from a meritocracy, then it becomes unstable. Maybe we are there, maybe not. But things can change.
 
2013-12-14 09:34:23 PM
Fark It:
Who cares whether or not the rich support the arts selfishly or selflessly? At the end of the day society (all 100% of it) benefits.

Well an argument could be made that it influences which art and culture prosper and which wither for lack of funding.  Ie art that drastically challenges the economic status quo might not do very well regardless of its merits, because the only people who are willing to support it would be impoverished radicals.

Of course I think the single most culturally distorting force existing today is "Oprah's Book Club", so different arguments could be made.  I suspect she would endorse Das Kapital if it made more people watch her show.
 
2013-12-14 09:36:59 PM

BafflerMeal: I have never even remotely understood giving money to a school i graduated from. To me it was a social and financial contract between the institutions and myself. When i graduated the contract was ended.

I can see giving money for scholorships for the needy, etc... but general alumi donations? Nope.



Yeah, that seems to be mainly for people who want their name to be seen on a list/plaque/room/building.

I suppose there's an argument that donations which preserve/improve the reputation of the school make your degree worth slightly more (socially if nothing else) but obviously that's a very marginal thing.

But if you feel like your school went above and beyond the terms of that "contract" while you were a student, you might want to return the favour.
 
2013-12-14 09:38:02 PM
Dollar for dollar, I figure the best good for a short and middle term charity is the UNFPA, and the best long term is health research. Donating to things with entry and tuition fees? Not so much.
 
2013-12-14 09:38:39 PM

brilett: What if you donated to your alma mater to support education there for the poor?


Bing.
O.

/Oh, and asbestos remediation. That always helps too.
 
2013-12-14 09:38:46 PM
Am I a bad person because I kind of agree with the headline on certain levels?  Not entirely, I just wish more people would give money to feeding the hungry, caring for the homeless, scholarships, etc than just giving money to the East Asian Historical Art Collection at City College.
 
2013-12-14 09:44:29 PM

RyansPrivates: Am I a bad person because I kind of agree with the headline on certain levels?  Not entirely, I just wish more people would give money to feeding the hungry, caring for the homeless, scholarships, etc than just giving money to the East Asian Historical Art Collection at City College.


I know fark is the land absolutes, but it is possible to donate to both.

/donates to cat rescue AND my local food bank
//volunteers at both too
 
2013-12-14 09:44:50 PM
Robert Reich is currently a professor of mine and someone I deeply respect, but he seems off base with this one. Even the brightest of minds have dark spots I guess.

/stressed for his farking final
 
2013-12-14 09:47:59 PM

twistedmetal: Meh, my alma mater took a chance on me, gave me a profession. The poor never did that for me.


What you said.  I give to the universities I attended (undergraduate and graduate) because I got a lot our of them and attended for cheap money due to scholarships.  Maybe me donating will allow them to provide the same opportunity to someone else.

Or maybe I should save my money to stock up on ammo for when TV's Vinnie and his vanguard of internet tough guys come charging through the breach.
 
2013-12-14 09:48:40 PM
I don't give money to my University or to the poor. Fark them both.
 
2013-12-14 09:49:17 PM

RyansPrivates: Am I a bad person because I kind of agree with the headline on certain levels?  Not entirely, I just wish more people would give money to feeding the hungry, caring for the homeless, scholarships, etc than just giving money to the East Asian Historical Art Collection at City College.


You feel food is more important. We feel that culture is just as important.
 
2013-12-14 09:51:32 PM

No Such Agency: Fark It:
Who cares whether or not the rich support the arts selfishly or selflessly? At the end of the day society (all 100% of it) benefits.

Well an argument could be made that it influences which art and culture prosper and which wither for lack of funding.  Ie art that drastically challenges the economic status quo might not do very well regardless of its merits, because the only people who are willing to support it would be impoverished radicals.

Of course I think the single most culturally distorting force existing today is "Oprah's Book Club", so different arguments could be made.  I suspect she would endorse Das Kapital if it made more people watch her show.


"Ie art that drastically challenges the economic status quo might not do very well regardless of its merits, because the only people who are willing to support it would be impoverished radicals."

Gotta disagree, there are many quite wealthy sports/celebrity types who will go against the status quo and support fringe artists just because they can. Just my 2¢...
 
2013-12-14 09:51:58 PM

kinshane: twistedmetal: Meh, my alma mater took a chance on me, gave me a profession. The poor never did that for me.

What you said.  I give to the universities I attended (undergraduate and graduate) because I got a lot our of them and attended for cheap money due to scholarships.  Maybe me donating will allow them to provide the same opportunity to someone else.

Or maybe I should save my money to stock up on ammo for when TV's Vinnie and his vanguard of internet tough guys come charging through the breach.


Absolutely right.
 
2013-12-14 09:52:09 PM

AnyName: RyansPrivates: Am I a bad person because I kind of agree with the headline on certain levels?  Not entirely, I just wish more people would give money to feeding the hungry, caring for the homeless, scholarships, etc than just giving money to the East Asian Historical Art Collection at City College.

I know fark is the land absolutes, but it is possible to donate to both.

/donates to cat rescue AND my local food bank
//volunteers at both too


I think you demonstrate the point I was trying to make: it is good to give your donations to benevolence and something else.  Just don't put all your eggs in the "arts" basket.

I wish more people would give to food banks (and volunteer).  One of the primary charitable donations I have is to a local food bank/homeless shelter/advocacy center.  Done some computer work for them "pro bono" since that is my area of "expertise".

/Cat rescue is a good thing too, too many feral cats around in general
//Spay and neuter your pets
///And maybe some of the politicians
////Slashies!
 
2013-12-14 09:52:10 PM
Nope. Mine has been building new buildings or rebuilding old ones (residence) for the past 15 years, so that's all they want it for.

I'd rather give to those who truly need it. I've not been to my alma mater in 13 years, and all they do for me now is send an alumni magazine and call me for money.
 
2013-12-14 09:52:54 PM

No Such Agency: Of course I think the single most culturally distorting force existing today is "Oprah's Book Club", so different arguments could be made.


I agree with that.
 
2013-12-14 09:54:42 PM

cman: RyansPrivates: Am I a bad person because I kind of agree with the headline on certain levels?  Not entirely, I just wish more people would give money to feeding the hungry, caring for the homeless, scholarships, etc than just giving money to the East Asian Historical Art Collection at City College.

You feel food is more important. We feel that culture is just as important.


So you think culture is as important as people meeting their basic needs for food and shelter.  You must be fun.
 
2013-12-14 09:57:42 PM
If you don't take Salon seriously you're an uneducated Republican loving troglodyte. Wait, no you're not.
 
2013-12-14 09:59:03 PM
Why would I give money to the poor? They already have a better sports program than my alma mater.
 
2013-12-14 09:59:34 PM
Considering mine is small, public, attended mostly by working-class students on state funds and still manages to turn out amazing research with tiny, under-equipped departments... yeah, I'll cut them a slice if I ever come into money. It's an investment in the future.

If you went to Harvard or Columbia, and your school already has more resources than the gods themselves, then yeah, maybe it's better spent elsewhere.
 
2013-12-14 10:00:54 PM
"Her belly may be full, but her spirit will be empty!"
 
2013-12-14 10:02:34 PM

cman: RyansPrivates: Am I a bad person because I kind of agree with the headline on certain levels?  Not entirely, I just wish more people would give money to feeding the hungry, caring for the homeless, scholarships, etc than just giving money to the East Asian Historical Art Collection at City College.

You feel food is more important. We feel that culture is just as important.


A whynotboth.jpg would do just fine.

That being said, here's a relevant SMBC. Replace "giant particle colliders" with "music and the arts"

www.smbc-comics.com
 
2013-12-14 10:05:54 PM
If you're donating to a service for affluent people, you are not being charitable, you're making an investment. You shouldn't be able to write off your investment as a charity donation.

/no tiny violin for you
 
2013-12-14 10:06:49 PM
This is the first year I have had the opportunity to really give some decent donations. We have always supported out church which does a lot of outreach.  I got a start on putting together a scholarship fund for my university for kids who attend high school in the same rural area I do...will take about five years to get it endowed if the bonuses hold up. Gave a couple of decent contributions to a second tier museum I care about. Gave a donation to an innercity food bank that was only a few hundred dollars but was a game changer for them as well as a good one to the Big Brothers Big Sisters program.  Also small donations to a free clinic, a boys' home, a children's choir. and a couple other charities.  It was a good year and it felt good. I'm not a big money guy, but I've always saved and have a little disposable income now, so why not pass it around. Honestly there are times that it seems a little scary...that maybe I ought to be saving the money or doing something for my family or buying a new car...I drive a 1999 Lincoln Continental ... but it fits me pretty well.

The article is interesting and worthy of thought, though. There's a lot of difference between contributing to a Top 25 football program and a starving kid.
 
2013-12-14 10:08:50 PM

The My Little Pony Killer: If you're donating to a service for affluent people, you are not being charitable, you're making an investment. You shouldn't be able to write off your investment as a charity donation.

/no tiny violin for you


If I donate to the musical arts, I expect one of these:
i.telegraph.co.uk
 
2013-12-14 10:09:16 PM

RyansPrivates: cman: RyansPrivates: Am I a bad person because I kind of agree with the headline on certain levels?  Not entirely, I just wish more people would give money to feeding the hungry, caring for the homeless, scholarships, etc than just giving money to the East Asian Historical Art Collection at City College.

You feel food is more important. We feel that culture is just as important.

So you think culture is as important as people meeting their basic needs for food and shelter.  You must be fun.


Without culture, what would be the point of civilization? Culture is the most important aspect that defines humanity. The fact that you would be willing to see it go the wayside is sad.
 
2013-12-14 10:10:13 PM
The average homeless person might have a net worth of about $0. The average graduating college student probably has a net worth of -$50,000 (or some negative number, considering all the student debt).
 
Displayed 50 of 121 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report