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(Yahoo)   Prince Harry is 'chuffed' to have spent the last 2 weeks skiing 200 miles across Antarctica to the South Pole with a group of disabled Iraq & Afghanistan vets. Interesting story to the left, interesting theory on WTF 'chuffed' means to the right   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 82
    More: Cool, Prince Harry, Antarctica to the South Pole, South Pole, W.T.F.?, Afghanistan, Iraq, Antarctica, Princess Anne  
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2518 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Dec 2013 at 12:58 PM (45 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



82 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-12-14 02:53:12 PM  
chapped + muff = chuffed
 
2013-12-14 03:01:05 PM  
chuffed = smug git
 
2013-12-14 03:03:41 PM  
A chuff is the distinctive noise a Wookie makes when s/he laughs.

I shiat you not, this is established canon within the Star Wars universe.

Silly nerds.

31.media.tumblr.com


/Soft Wookie Chuff would be an excellent name for an indie band though
 
2013-12-14 03:06:35 PM  
Many boffins died getting us this definition.
 
2013-12-14 03:32:56 PM  
"Chuffed" means whatever you want it to. Just substitute it into a phrase. Infer the meaning from context.

All these are valid expressions in Sheffield:

"Chuffed to bits" - extremely content/happy.
"What the chuff do you think you're doing?"
"She stuffed it up her chuff." - lady parts
"Chuffin' hell!"  - exclamation of surprise  (there was a band called "The Chuffinelles"...)
"He's a right chuffer, he is" - displeasure at somebody's actions.
etc.
 
2013-12-14 03:33:50 PM  

Spuddy345: All it means is that you're very pleased and happy with something.


Nope.
 
2013-12-14 03:35:40 PM  

Joce678: Spuddy345: All it means is that you're very pleased and happy with something.

Nope.


I mean yes, it means that in that context.
 
2013-12-14 03:38:27 PM  

Spuddy345: All it means is that you're very pleased and happy with something. why is discovering a slang word from another country such a big deal for you?

That's a genuine question, I've dealt with english speakers from all over the world, I've heard endless american and canadian slang on the TV and in movies. I'm not continuously suprised and OMGWTFBBQ when i discover a new slang word. I am usually very happy and curious to find out what these words are.

If you find a new word like chuffed, you like the sound of it and you think you have a need for a word with that meaning perhaps consider adopting it instead of running for the hills.


It's mostly because Americans are insecure about their linguistic heritage. Nothing to see here.
 
2013-12-14 03:47:26 PM  
The Australian word "stoked" is similar to the British "chuffed" (I think).
 
2013-12-14 04:05:45 PM  

whither_apophis: Many boffins died getting us this definition.


I love you sooooooo much right now.   Welcome to my favs.

You see, to my mind, the well coiffed throwaway is the height of farking.
 
2013-12-14 04:49:40 PM  

iserlohn: Spuddy345: All it means is that you're very pleased and happy with something. why is discovering a slang word from another country such a big deal for you?

That's a genuine question, I've dealt with english speakers from all over the world, I've heard endless american and canadian slang on the TV and in movies. I'm not continuously suprised and OMGWTFBBQ when i discover a new slang word. I am usually very happy and curious to find out what these words are.

If you find a new word like chuffed, you like the sound of it and you think you have a need for a word with that meaning perhaps consider adopting it instead of running for the hills.

It's mostly because Americans are insecure about their linguistic heritage. Nothing to see here.


Or as Joce678 noted, it's because 'chuffed' is one of those words that means lots of different things to different people, even in England, and it's not at all clear from Harry's context exactly which definition he meant by it.

One or the other.
 
2013-12-14 05:02:19 PM  
I expect he's knackered too. But if he'd known it cause a stew, he'd have kept his gob shut.
 
2013-12-14 05:04:24 PM  

whistleridge: [img.fark.net image 789x401]
Makes sense. Isn't EVERY British slang word some synonym for being drunk?


Was exactly what I figured it meant.
 
2013-12-14 05:08:38 PM  
bitsandpieces.us
 
2013-12-14 05:11:13 PM  

Chariset: chuffed = pleased, thrilled, delighted


Indeed.  Having had British penpals many years ago I can attest to that.
 
2013-12-14 05:36:24 PM  

whistleridge: iserlohn: Spuddy345: All it means is that you're very pleased and happy with something. why is discovering a slang word from another country such a big deal for you?

That's a genuine question, I've dealt with english speakers from all over the world, I've heard endless american and canadian slang on the TV and in movies. I'm not continuously suprised and OMGWTFBBQ when i discover a new slang word. I am usually very happy and curious to find out what these words are.

If you find a new word like chuffed, you like the sound of it and you think you have a need for a word with that meaning perhaps consider adopting it instead of running for the hills.

It's mostly because Americans are insecure about their linguistic heritage. Nothing to see here.

Or as Joce678 noted, it's because 'chuffed' is one of those words that means lots of different things to different people, even in England, and it's not at all clear from Harry's context exactly which definition he meant by it.

One or the other.


Thanks for proving my point.
 
2013-12-14 05:46:38 PM  
Chuffed in chronological order:

"rude fellow"
"bloated with fat"
"displeased, gruff"
"pleased, happy"

http://etymonline.com/index.php?search=chuffed

In other news, the people who rail against the damn kids' modern trend of turning words into their own antonyms have not been paying attention.
 
2013-12-14 06:27:15 PM  

iserlohn: whistleridge: iserlohn: Spuddy345: All it means is that you're very pleased and happy with something. why is discovering a slang word from another country such a big deal for you?

That's a genuine question, I've dealt with english speakers from all over the world, I've heard endless american and canadian slang on the TV and in movies. I'm not continuously suprised and OMGWTFBBQ when i discover a new slang word. I am usually very happy and curious to find out what these words are.

If you find a new word like chuffed, you like the sound of it and you think you have a need for a word with that meaning perhaps consider adopting it instead of running for the hills.

It's mostly because Americans are insecure about their linguistic heritage. Nothing to see here.

Or as Joce678 noted, it's because 'chuffed' is one of those words that means lots of different things to different people, even in England, and it's not at all clear from Harry's context exactly which definition he meant by it.

One or the other.

Thanks for proving my point.


What, that you're being an officious ass?

You proved that entirely without me, so I can't take credit. But you're welcome anyway for the assist.
 
2013-12-14 06:35:41 PM  

MsStatement: BigNumber12: It's the sound made by trains on the Isle of Sodor.

Know how I know you have a toddler?


Completely separate issues. I've only advanced as far as I have in my career because I learned that it's bad to cause confusion and delay, and if I do so, I'll be mocked by employees who burn a different type of fuel than I do.
 
2013-12-14 06:52:41 PM  

whistleridge: iserlohn: whistleridge: iserlohn: Spuddy345: All it means is that you're very pleased and happy with something. why is discovering a slang word from another country such a big deal for you?

That's a genuine question, I've dealt with english speakers from all over the world, I've heard endless american and canadian slang on the TV and in movies. I'm not continuously suprised and OMGWTFBBQ when i discover a new slang word. I am usually very happy and curious to find out what these words are.

If you find a new word like chuffed, you like the sound of it and you think you have a need for a word with that meaning perhaps consider adopting it instead of running for the hills.

It's mostly because Americans are insecure about their linguistic heritage. Nothing to see here.

Or as Joce678 noted, it's because 'chuffed' is one of those words that means lots of different things to different people, even in England, and it's not at all clear from Harry's context exactly which definition he meant by it.

One or the other.

Thanks for proving my point.

What, that you're being an officious ass?

You proved that entirely without me, so I can't take credit. But you're welcome anyway for the assist.


Hey wait, did I hit a nerve? Talking about being an ass, nice photoshop BTW, must of been the best 5 mins of your Saturday.
 
2013-12-14 07:27:24 PM  

Valiente: Harry: the new "good Nazi".

[0.tqn.com image 232x300]

Getting the royal sack:

He's clearly getting a PR makeover. He'll be kissing an AIDS baby in a minefield any day now.


Naw, Harry seems to be a good guy:

"Prince Harry saved me from homophobic attack during Alberta training, soldier reveals

Now, one of the British army's first openly gay soldiers has made public another side of the prince's Canadian sojourn, saying that Harry helped thwart a potential gay bashing by his fellow soldiers while they were at CFB Suffield.

LCpl. Wharton says he had infuriated six infantry sergeants after boasting about his sexual prowess. He was expecting to be beaten up but Prince Harry defused the situation and warned the soldiers to leave the gay trooper alone.

A grateful LCpl. Wharton said "I had been on track for a battering and had been rescued."

He added that the prince on another occasion told him that he was told he and his older brother, William, were gay icons.

"Honestly, I'm sure you're not," LCpl. Wharton replied.

"Is it because I'm [expletive] ginger?" the prince asked."
 
2013-12-14 11:00:09 PM  

BigNumber12: MsStatement: BigNumber12: It's the sound made by trains on the Isle of Sodor.

Know how I know you have a toddler?

Completely separate issues. I've only advanced as far as I have in my career because I learned that it's bad to cause confusion and delay, and if I do so, I'll be mocked by employees who burn a different type of fuel than I do.


I liked the windowless van answer better.
 
2013-12-14 11:04:06 PM  
chuffed = stoked = (american slang) fark yea !!!
 
2013-12-15 08:39:43 AM  

Valiente: Harry: the new "good Nazi".

[0.tqn.com image 232x300]

Getting the royal sack:

He's clearly getting a PR makeover. He'll be kissing an AIDS baby in a minefield any day now.


Sounds more like a Japanese game show from a dsytopic future, a la Running Man.
 
2013-12-15 08:44:29 AM  

iserlohn: Spuddy345: All it means is that you're very pleased and happy with something. why is discovering a slang word from another country such a big deal for you?

That's a genuine question, I've dealt with english speakers from all over the world, I've heard endless american and canadian slang on the TV and in movies. I'm not continuously suprised and OMGWTFBBQ when i discover a new slang word. I am usually very happy and curious to find out what these words are.

If you find a new word like chuffed, you like the sound of it and you think you have a need for a word with that meaning perhaps consider adopting it instead of running for the hills.

It's mostly because Americans are insecure about their linguistic heritage. Nothing to see here.


If I was English I'd be mortified at my "linguistic heritage".
 
2013-12-15 08:45:06 AM  

jamspoon: The Australian word "stoked" is similar to the British "chuffed" (I think).


That's an Aussie word? I thought it was valley speak.
 
2013-12-15 10:04:16 AM  

Medic Zero: iserlohn: Spuddy345: All it means is that you're very pleased and happy with something. why is discovering a slang word from another country such a big deal for you?

That's a genuine question, I've dealt with english speakers from all over the world, I've heard endless american and canadian slang on the TV and in movies. I'm not continuously suprised and OMGWTFBBQ when i discover a new slang word. I am usually very happy and curious to find out what these words are.

If you find a new word like chuffed, you like the sound of it and you think you have a need for a word with that meaning perhaps consider adopting it instead of running for the hills.

It's mostly because Americans are insecure about their linguistic heritage. Nothing to see here.

If I was English I'd be mortified at my "linguistic heritage".


It's generally accepted that modern English developed from middle English which in turn is from Old English and Norman French and a bit of Old norse. In England.

Americans on the other hand has been trying to get everybody to drop the "U" from words like colour and neighbour (among other things), whereas the rest of the world mostly ignores them. Some also insist calling their language "American" instead of "American English" as if their inferiority complex isn't obvious enough.
 
2013-12-15 11:25:12 AM  
iserlohn: Medic Zero: iserlohn: Spuddy345: All it means is that you're very pleased and happy with something. why is discovering a slang word from another country such a big deal for you?

That's a genuine question, I've dealt with english speakers from all over the world, I've heard endless american and canadian slang on the TV and in movies. I'm not continuously suprised and OMGWTFBBQ when i discover a new slang word. I am usually very happy and curious to find out what these words are.

If you find a new word like chuffed, you like the sound of it and you think you have a need for a word with that meaning perhaps consider adopting it instead of running for the hills.

It's mostly because Americans are insecure about their linguistic heritage. Nothing to see here.

If I was English I'd be mortified at my "linguistic heritage".

It's generally accepted that modern English developed from middle English which in turn is from Old English and Norman French and a bit of Old norse. In England.

Americans on the other hand has been trying to get everybody to drop the "U" from words like colour and neighbour (among other things), whereas the rest of the world mostly ignores them. Some also insist calling their language "American" instead of "American English" as if their inferiority complex isn't obvious enough.


Right-o chavvy guv'nr!
(insert a paragraph of meaningless rhyming here)
Cheerio!


/ Like I said, if I was English I'd be mortified at my "linguistic heritage".
 
2013-12-15 12:51:04 PM  

Medic Zero: iserlohn: Medic Zero: iserlohn: Spuddy345: All it means is that you're very pleased and happy with something. why is discovering a slang word from another country such a big deal for you?

That's a genuine question, I've dealt with english speakers from all over the world, I've heard endless american and canadian slang on the TV and in movies. I'm not continuously suprised and OMGWTFBBQ when i discover a new slang word. I am usually very happy and curious to find out what these words are.

If you find a new word like chuffed, you like the sound of it and you think you have a need for a word with that meaning perhaps consider adopting it instead of running for the hills.

It's mostly because Americans are insecure about their linguistic heritage. Nothing to see here.

If I was English I'd be mortified at my "linguistic heritage".

It's generally accepted that modern English developed from middle English which in turn is from Old English and Norman French and a bit of Old norse. In England.

Americans on the other hand has been trying to get everybody to drop the "U" from words like colour and neighbour (among other things), whereas the rest of the world mostly ignores them. Some also insist calling their language "American" instead of "American English" as if their inferiority complex isn't obvious enough.

Right-o chavvy guv'nr!
(insert a paragraph of meaningless rhyming here)
Cheerio!


/ Like I said, if I was English I'd be mortified at my "linguistic heritage".


No, the equivalent if you're English is doing a campy impression of a New Yorker. But don't let me stop you overcompensating!
 
2013-12-15 04:19:34 PM  

iserlohn: Medic Zero: iserlohn: Medic Zero: iserlohn: Spuddy345: All it means is that you're very pleased and happy with something. why is discovering a slang word from another country such a big deal for you?

That's a genuine question, I've dealt with english speakers from all over the world, I've heard endless american and canadian slang on the TV and in movies. I'm not continuously suprised and OMGWTFBBQ when i discover a new slang word. I am usually very happy and curious to find out what these words are.

If you find a new word like chuffed, you like the sound of it and you think you have a need for a word with that meaning perhaps consider adopting it instead of running for the hills.

It's mostly because Americans are insecure about their linguistic heritage. Nothing to see here.

If I was English I'd be mortified at my "linguistic heritage".

It's generally accepted that modern English developed from middle English which in turn is from Old English and Norman French and a bit of Old norse. In England.

Americans on the other hand has been trying to get everybody to drop the "U" from words like colour and neighbour (among other things), whereas the rest of the world mostly ignores them. Some also insist calling their language "American" instead of "American English" as if their inferiority complex isn't obvious enough.

Right-o chavvy guv'nr!
(insert a paragraph of meaningless rhyming here)
Cheerio!


/ Like I said, if I was English I'd be mortified at my "linguistic heritage".

No, the equivalent if you're English is doing a campy impression of a New Yorker. But don't let me stop you overcompensating!


I'm just farking with you, but don't let that stop you from over-analyzing me.
 
NFA [TotalFark]
2013-12-15 09:21:15 PM  

EvaDewer: NFA: I'm an American and my language is correct, so use any foreign lingo around me, even if it's clear what you mean, at the risk of my disdain.

You sound fun.

/American


Put on some big boy pants Nancy, Brits deserve every bit of ridicule one can muster!
 
NFA [TotalFark]
2013-12-15 09:31:09 PM  

tylerdurden217: I know, right? Like classmate, roommate, teammate, bandmate, workmate, etc. Unless you are having sex with everyone in your class, house, apartment, basketball team, garage band, workplace, etc. Then I think the word mate might be easy enough to separate from sex. In the context used by the tech, it's pretty clear what was meant, making your vernacular clarification completely unnecessary and annoying.

Then again, I've never referred to my wife or any of the girlfriends I've ever had in my life as my "mate"... so maybe it's just me.



Cambridge Dictionary
definition of "mate"
mate
noun [C] (SEXUAL PARTNER) /meɪt/
› an animal's sexual partner:

Oxford Dictionary
mate1
Syllabification: (mate)
Pronunciation: /māt/
noun
1each of a pair of birds or other animals:
a male bird sings to court a mate
informal a person's husband, wife, or other sexual partner.
 
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