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(Flickr)   Every Picture Tells A Story: The British Library has released over a million images for anyone to use, remix and repurpose. The images were taken from the pages of 17th, 18th and 19th century books, digitized then released into the Public Domain   (flickr.com ) divider line
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3691 clicks; posted to Geek » on 14 Dec 2013 at 4:02 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



38 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-12-13 10:20:51 PM  
Excellent find, submitter.
 
2013-12-14 12:03:29 AM  
Three hundred freakin' years of everything from doodles to master pieces.  Sometimes it's not so bad being a human.
 
2013-12-14 12:27:07 AM  
i1282.photobucket.com
 
2013-12-14 02:36:33 AM  
The BL rocks.
 
2013-12-14 04:10:02 AM  
Any boobies or peckers?

/ornithologist
 
2013-12-14 04:14:22 AM  
PS contest?
 
2013-12-14 04:25:55 AM  
I have to bookmark this. It doesn't seem to work well with my phone.
 
2013-12-14 04:54:34 AM  
Excellent.

Also a good reminder of what's being lost thanks to the modern perversion of copyright.
 
2013-12-14 05:02:32 AM  
I love graphic novels, but this one made no sense, and just went on and on.
No way I'm I going to keep reading it.
 
2013-12-14 05:12:52 AM  

Monkeyfark Ridiculous: Excellent.

Also a good reminder of what's being lost thanks to the modern perversion of copyright.


Copywhat?
 
2013-12-14 05:24:58 AM  
They already were in the public domain
 
2013-12-14 05:34:44 AM  

doglover: Monkeyfark Ridiculous: Excellent.

Also a good reminder of what's being lost thanks to the modern perversion of copyright.

Copywhat?


Copywhither?
 
2013-12-14 06:02:41 AM  
Yeah, but without an index or some form of organization, it's damn near useless...
 
2013-12-14 06:08:15 AM  

Monkeyfark Ridiculous: Excellent.

Also a good reminder of what's being lost thanks to the modern perversion of copyright.


I know of several old computer games that were preserved only in the form of pirated Roms.

I should remember to thank the dread pirate neckbeard for that next time he comes ashore.
 
2013-12-14 08:24:57 AM  

cretinbob: They already were in the public domain


Yes, and now they are all in one convenient location
 
2013-12-14 08:38:51 AM  
So that means Wondermark is going to update to every day now instead of three a week?
 
2013-12-14 09:13:00 AM  
Two lesbian crocodiles with a dildo was not the 'threesome' that Spike had imagined...

i309.photobucket.com

...but he thought 'I'm already here; it might be fun and it's not like somebody is going to draw a picture and put it in a book!'

/ crocodildoans
// The Internet is not forever; the Oolite is forever
 
2013-12-14 09:15:39 AM  

fastbow: Yeah, but without an index or some form of organization, it's damn near useless...



Here is the original link, maybe you can assist them with creating an index, or preparing the high tea. Ladies love the high tea

  http://britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk/digital-scholarship/2013/12/a- mill ion-first-steps.html

///Subby
 
2013-12-14 09:25:59 AM  
How cromulent! I see many riveting tales arising from this venture.
 
2013-12-14 09:47:47 AM  
farm6.staticflickr.com
.
.
.
.
Looks like glue on the seat really is the oldest trick in the book.
 
2013-12-14 10:00:47 AM  

Huck And Molly Ziegler: Any boobies or peckers?

/ornithologist


More like hornithologist, amirite?
 
2013-12-14 10:34:40 AM  

dennysgod: .
.
.
.
Looks like glue on the seat really is the oldest trick in the book.


"Sticks much harder than-" oh, gum.
 
2013-12-14 01:14:51 PM  
Any Forbes' Insoluble Dry Plate sightings?
 
2013-12-14 01:26:05 PM  
I think all of these images were public domain anyway because they are so old.  Nice of them to digitize them, though.
 
2013-12-14 02:26:43 PM  

Monkeyfark Ridiculous: Excellent.

Also a good reminder of what's being lost thanks to the modern perversion of copyright.


I don't want to pay money for anything either. It's not fair!
 
2013-12-14 03:02:01 PM  

farm6.staticflickr.com

As soon as the girlfriend gets out of the bathroom, it's go time.

 
2013-12-14 03:16:27 PM  

AspectRatio: Monkeyfark Ridiculous: Excellent.

Also a good reminder of what's being lost thanks to the modern perversion of copyright.

I don't want to pay money for anything either. It's not fair!


Copyright was supposed to be a tradeoff.  You get a monopoly to profit from your own ideas for a time, where nobody can create derivatives and cut into your business.  The public benefits because eventually what you create is available for everyone to build from and enriches society as a whole.

That's no longer true.  IIRC, nothing has entered the public domain by copyright expiration that was created after 1920 or so, it's completely ridiculous.  And let's not even get into the whole issue of fair use and other rights being more restricted than ever and the DMCA allowing completely fraudulent usages by businesses with no practical penalty.
 
2013-12-14 03:35:02 PM  

cretinbob: They already were in the public domain


not the digital copies.
 
2013-12-14 04:17:12 PM  

AspectRatio: Monkeyfark Ridiculous: Excellent.

Also a good reminder of what's being lost thanks to the modern perversion of copyright.

I don't want to pay money for anything either. It's not fair!


Neither does anyone else on the internet who ignores copyrights.
 
2013-12-14 04:38:53 PM  

Abner Doon: AspectRatio: Monkeyfark Ridiculous: Excellent.

Also a good reminder of what's being lost thanks to the modern perversion of copyright.

I don't want to pay money for anything either. It's not fair!

Copyright was supposed to be a tradeoff.  You get a monopoly to profit from your own ideas for a time, where nobody can create derivatives and cut into your business.  The public benefits because eventually what you create is available for everyone to build from and enriches society as a whole.

That's no longer true.  IIRC, nothing has entered the public domain by copyright expiration that was created after 1920 or so, it's completely ridiculous.  And let's not even get into the whole issue of fair use and other rights being more restricted than ever and the DMCA allowing completely fraudulent usages by businesses with no practical penalty.


Burrough's Mars novels up to about 1931 are in the public domain, but a minor quibble over dates doesn't invalidate your point.

I would argue that if the original author is deceased, copyright expires.  If the intent is to encourage creative output, having a publishing company sitting on zombie copyrights really isn't assisting that goal.
 
2013-12-14 04:42:41 PM  

Abner Doon: AspectRatio: Monkeyfark Ridiculous: Excellent.

Also a good reminder of what's being lost thanks to the modern perversion of copyright.

I don't want to pay money for anything either. It's not fair!

Copyright was supposed to be a tradeoff.  You get a monopoly to profit from your own ideas for a time, where nobody can create derivatives and cut into your business.  The public benefits because eventually what you create is available for everyone to build from and enriches society as a whole.

That's no longer true.  IIRC, nothing has entered the public domain by copyright expiration that was created after 1920 or so, it's completely ridiculous.  And let's not even get into the whole issue of fair use and other rights being more restricted than ever and the DMCA allowing completely fraudulent usages by businesses with no practical penalty.


This.
 
2013-12-14 04:46:09 PM  

Bondith: Abner Doon: AspectRatio: Monkeyfark Ridiculous: Excellent.

Also a good reminder of what's being lost thanks to the modern perversion of copyright.

I don't want to pay money for anything either. It's not fair!

Copyright was supposed to be a tradeoff.  You get a monopoly to profit from your own ideas for a time, where nobody can create derivatives and cut into your business.  The public benefits because eventually what you create is available for everyone to build from and enriches society as a whole.

That's no longer true.  IIRC, nothing has entered the public domain by copyright expiration that was created after 1920 or so, it's completely ridiculous.  And let's not even get into the whole issue of fair use and other rights being more restricted than ever and the DMCA allowing completely fraudulent usages by businesses with no practical penalty.

Burrough's Mars novels up to about 1931 are in the public domain, but a minor quibble over dates doesn't invalidate your point.

I would argue that if the original author is deceased, copyright expires.  If the intent is to encourage creative output, having a publishing company sitting on zombie copyrights really isn't assisting that goal.


Ahh, thanks for the date correction.  I seem to recall that there's some edge cases from a couple of decades after that too, but I'm too lazy to look it up (I seem to recall it being quite technical).

I used to like that idea too, about it expiring when the author dies...but that creates quite an incentive to knock off a few key people now and then.  It seemed much more sane when it was just a set time period.  IIRC it started at a flat 21 years or something like than from time of creation, which seems fair.  If you can't profit enough in 20 years or so to make it worth creating something, you very likely were never going to.
 
2013-12-14 06:10:07 PM  
copyright was 14 years plus a possible 14 year extension. 28 year total thar
 
2013-12-14 07:20:28 PM  

Abner Doon: AspectRatio: Monkeyfark Ridiculous: Excellent.

Also a good reminder of what's being lost thanks to the modern perversion of copyright.

I don't want to pay money for anything either. It's not fair!

Copyright was supposed to be a tradeoff.  You get a monopoly to profit from your own ideas for a time, where nobody can create derivatives and cut into your business.  The public benefits because eventually what you create is available for everyone to build from and enriches society as a whole.

That's no longer true.  IIRC, nothing has entered the public domain by copyright expiration that was created after 1920 or so, it's completely ridiculous.  And let's not even get into the whole issue of fair use and other rights being more restricted than ever and the DMCA allowing completely fraudulent usages by businesses with no practical penalty.


The Mickey Mouse rule. We're killing our 'culture' for disney's profits.
 
2013-12-14 09:55:43 PM  
farm8.staticflickr.com

'Scuze me while I whip this out.
 
2013-12-14 10:22:17 PM  
farm4.staticflickr.com

NO NO, NOT THE UFIA!
 
2013-12-14 10:51:02 PM  

Evil High Priest: Abner Doon: AspectRatio: Monkeyfark Ridiculous: Excellent.

Also a good reminder of what's being lost thanks to the modern perversion of copyright.

I don't want to pay money for anything either. It's not fair!

Copyright was supposed to be a tradeoff.  You get a monopoly to profit from your own ideas for a time, where nobody can create derivatives and cut into your business.  The public benefits because eventually what you create is available for everyone to build from and enriches society as a whole.

That's no longer true.  IIRC, nothing has entered the public domain by copyright expiration that was created after 1920 or so, it's completely ridiculous.  And let's not even get into the whole issue of fair use and other rights being more restricted than ever and the DMCA allowing completely fraudulent usages by businesses with no practical penalty.

The Mickey Mouse rule. We're killing our 'culture' for disney's profits.


CPGray knows all.
 
2013-12-15 06:08:20 AM  
wow.

/bookmark
 
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