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(AZCentral)   Phoenix-area cities increasingly rely on volunteer policemen to don special uniforms, tool around in marked cruisers, free up officers to hunt real criminals. "They don't complain like paid people do. They truly come and want to help us out"   (azcentral.com) divider line 67
    More: Strange, vehicle identification number, volunteers, towers, crimes  
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2828 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Dec 2013 at 3:11 PM (39 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



67 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-12-13 02:24:06 PM
So who volunteers for this? Old retired people? Seems a shame that these aren't real jobs for real people with real bills to pay.

And I'm sure the paid officers appreciate the comment about complaining.
 
2013-12-13 02:30:09 PM

edmo: So who volunteers for this? Old retired people? Seems a shame that these aren't real jobs for real people with real bills to pay.


We do it in Memphis/Shelby County. Most of the people who do it are there because they want to be hired on full time with the department, and have to work at least 24 hours a month. The department, unless presented with a pretty heavily qualified outside candidate, tends to almost exclusively recruit it's paid officers from the reserve volunteers. The others are people who have retired or work other jobs outside law enforcement, but were once cops themselves and wanted to stay in the position.

The Reserve deputies in our area get the same training the paid cops do - including State compliant POST training and certification, and the ability to buy into the county health/vision/dental insurance (which is pretty tits, and attracts a lot of LE and non-LE (Rescue and Special Services - the people who check on the elderly/disabled) volunteers). Interestingly enough, they're held to a higher behavioral standard in practice, as well, than the paid guys.

It's a pretty cost effective, successful program. IIRC, it saved the department 15 million dollars on the patrol side alone last year, not to count the millions saved during special events such as Memphis in May and the Fair.
 
2013-12-13 02:41:22 PM
In a related development, Phoenix-area cities are facing an impending donut shortage
 
2013-12-13 02:57:02 PM
Yea, I mean it's great that graffiti and petty vandalism are down 80%, but can they explain the 900% increase in heavy-sack beatings?
 
2013-12-13 03:06:45 PM

scottydoesntknow: Yea, I mean it's great that graffiti and petty vandalism are down 80%, but can they explain the 900% increase in heavy-sack beatings?


"Boys will be boys"?
 
2013-12-13 03:07:00 PM

scottydoesntknow: Yea, I mean it's great that graffiti and petty vandalism are down 80%, but can they explain the 900% increase in heavy-sack beatings?


cdn2-b.examiner.com
 
2013-12-13 03:14:37 PM
Well, what would you do if hoodlums broke into your apartment, murdered your wife and raped the shiat out of your daughter?

/ it's like he has some sort of Death Wish
 
2013-12-13 03:15:42 PM
Yur a dep'ty now, boy!

www.angelfire.com
 
2013-12-13 03:15:57 PM
That's what I want for my community, volunteer people with no legal authority, driving around looking for criminals.
 
2013-12-13 03:16:15 PM
i.imgur.com
 
2013-12-13 03:16:32 PM
Maybe they can hire Zimmerman.

No wait, he's too brown.
 
2013-12-13 03:16:39 PM
My town has a group of volunteer police officers who do things like crowd control at football games and the town festival. They are mostly retired officers who help out. They were activated when the tornado came through and we need to keep all the world's shiatstains from coming in to gawk at the damage and loot.

It would be odd to rely on a volunteer force more heavily though. That would make me uneasy.
 
2013-12-13 03:17:39 PM

edmo: So who volunteers for this?


upload.wikimedia.org
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-12-13 03:17:47 PM
In my area we have volunteer "auxiliary police" who can't arrest people.  They do crowd control and watch out for suspicious people.
 
2013-12-13 03:18:52 PM

ChipNASA: [i.imgur.com image 640x411]


Dammit!
 
2013-12-13 03:20:00 PM

ChipNASA: george.jpg


It took 10 posts?  Then got 2 of the next 3.
 
2013-12-13 03:20:20 PM
Haven't they yet been told that snitches get stitches?
 
2013-12-13 03:22:01 PM
upload.wikimedia.org
sounds familiar ...
 
2013-12-13 03:22:34 PM
www.imfdb.org
 
2013-12-13 03:23:16 PM

edmo: So who volunteers for this? Old retired people? Seems a shame that these aren't real jobs for real people with real bills to pay.

And I'm sure the paid officers appreciate the comment about complaining.


Our city uses them for Parking and Code.  Spend a couple grand on golf carts and uniforms, and you are set.

Zero payroll.

Generate huge revenue in violations.

The retirees get to play Police Officer all day long.

Massive profits.

I've seen it.  The DBPD talks about it.  Hell if I had sales people that would work for 100 percent free, I would be all over it like a bum on a bologna sandwich.
 
2013-12-13 03:23:18 PM
I wonder what liability insurance costs for a volunteer police squad. Can't be pretty.
 
2013-12-13 03:24:13 PM
In NYC they are auxilliary police, and you wouldn't believe the abuse they take from real cops on the radio.
 
2013-12-13 03:24:15 PM
My FIL does this down in Pinal County, he can do pretty much everything a regular officer can do, except for make arrests. He even gets a department car to drive and has gone through firearms certification. Yeah, he's retired and doing it for free, but at least it gets him away from his wife, I think that's worth all of the free work in the world.
 
2013-12-13 03:24:19 PM
i.imgur.com
 
2013-12-13 03:25:08 PM
They should have special redesigned uniforms....

images.amcnetworks.com
 
2013-12-13 03:25:09 PM
Law enforcement groupies are farking creepy.
 
2013-12-13 03:26:28 PM
San Diego has the RSVP (Retired Senior Volunteer Program) that does stuff like this, too. I can't see why it's so revolutionary.
 
2013-12-13 03:26:44 PM

Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque: I wonder what liability insurance costs for a volunteer police squad. Can't be pretty.


I'll bet they don't have any. Nice loophole.
 
2013-12-13 03:28:36 PM

Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque: I wonder what liability insurance costs for a volunteer police squad. Can't be pretty.


But they're getting lots of free labor and driving down American wages across the board, which is totally awesome.  So it balances out.
 
2013-12-13 03:29:11 PM

cgraves67: My town has a group of volunteer police officers who do things like crowd control at football games and the town festival. They are mostly retired officers who help out. They were activated when the tornado came through and we need to keep all the world's shiatstains from coming in to gawk at the damage and loot.

It would be odd to rely on a volunteer force more heavily though. That would make me uneasy.


ZAZ: In my area we have volunteer "auxiliary police" who can't arrest people.  They do crowd control and watch out for suspicious people.


Same in thing in Georgia.  As far as I know, they're mostly an extra set of eyes with no real authority (and definitely unarmed).
Screen out the Harry Callahan wannabes and keep to civic-minded, responsible adults and it can be a good thing.
 
2013-12-13 03:29:53 PM
I guess since AZ got sued for enforcing a law the government wouldn't the Minute Men needed to find something else to do
 
2013-12-13 03:32:55 PM
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-12-13 03:33:52 PM

fallingblox: sounds familiar ...


Man you got a big posse.
Man you got a big posse.
 
2013-12-13 03:35:43 PM
So does this mean that if I get a false alarm from the security system in my vacation home in W. Phoenix, and volunteers show up instead of real cops, that the city won't hit me with a $96 fine to "prevent police officers from wasting their time"?

No?

Didn't think so.
 
2013-12-13 03:36:06 PM
Nearly every police department in the country has a reserve component.  Some are paid, some are not, but everyone has the same training, if not always the same level of experience as full time officers.  There are a lot of reasons you become a reserve officer.  The most common, is often because it is the easiest and fastest way to get hired on as a full time officer when you are fresh out of the academy, and don't have a whole lot of experience.  Think of it as being like a police intern, with most of these guys getting picked up in less than a year.

I have also known reserve officers who were professionals who made a lot of money, but wanted to serve the community at weekends.  One of the best police officers I ever knew was a surgeon who would don a police uniform every Friday night.  Guy was a lifesaver on an accident scene, and even spent a bunch of money out of his own pocket refurbishing the older police cars that were used by the reserve division, so that the reserve officers had vehicles as good as the fulltimers.

I also knew people, mostly single parents, that loved being police officers, but couldn't make the commitment to working shift work, because of their family obligations.  Our department was one of the few that paid its reserve officers a fair wage, so we attracted a lot of these guys and gals.  About half our force was reserve officers, which saved our butts during special events, and heavy tourist weekends.
 
2013-12-13 03:36:20 PM
They do this where my parents moved to. In the summer the population goes from about 20k to 100k+. They will usually team a volunteer with a paid officer, you can tell the difference because the paid cop has the full on cop utility belt and the volunteer will have just the night stick, cuffs and radio.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-12-13 03:37:22 PM
Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque

Around here they aren't supposed to shoot people so they should be cheap to insure.
 
2013-12-13 03:37:37 PM
Yay, more authoritarians!
 
2013-12-13 03:38:47 PM
Frees 'em up to run more radar speed traps, because that's what they love more than anything in this world.

It sends more business to the paralegal "ticket specialists" because, guess what? they are all retired cops.

/Goddamn racket..
 
2013-12-13 03:38:52 PM

edmo: So who volunteers for this? Old retired people? Seems a shame that these aren't real jobs for real people with real bills to pay.

And I'm sure the paid officers appreciate the comment about complaining.


That's the point of volunteer work... Sheriff Joe started this, and parts of it have worked well, the Pussy Posse(So named because they used to do prostitute stings) will beef up a presence in mall parking lots at Xmas time, and help cut down on car break-ins, including educating people that they see leaving packages out in the open as easy targets. Being Joe, he misuses the Posse a lot, but it's hard to complain about the Xmas part.
 
2013-12-13 03:41:35 PM
They have some of these guys drive around and help out people stuck on the side of the road.
Those guys are awesome.
 
2013-12-13 03:41:42 PM

Some Coke Drinking Guy: Nearly every police department in the country has a reserve component.  Some are paid, some are not, but everyone has the same training, if not always the same level of experience as full time officers.  There are a lot of reasons you become a reserve officer.  The most common, is often because it is the easiest and fastest way to get hired on as a full time officer when you are fresh out of the academy, and don't have a whole lot of experience.  Think of it as being like a police intern, with most of these guys getting picked up in less than a year.

I have also known reserve officers who were professionals who made a lot of money, but wanted to serve the community at weekends.  One of the best police officers I ever knew was a surgeon who would don a police uniform every Friday night.  Guy was a lifesaver on an accident scene, and even spent a bunch of money out of his own pocket refurbishing the older police cars that were used by the reserve division, so that the reserve officers had vehicles as good as the fulltimers.

I also knew people, mostly single parents, that loved being police officers, but couldn't make the commitment to working shift work, because of their family obligations.  Our department was one of the few that paid its reserve officers a fair wage, so we attracted a lot of these guys and gals.  About half our force was reserve officers, which saved our butts during special events, and heavy tourist weekends.


One more thing.  I also think the way to secure our schools against active shooters, is to actively recruit teachers as reserve officers, provided they pass the background and psych test.  You then send them through an academy class during the summer, work them a couple weekends in uniform every month so they get to know the cops, and learn their skills, then let them carry their pieces (which they have been trained to properly and safely use) on school.  Only need two teachers or administrators from each school to make it work, plus the ones who do it get an extra little money which every teacher needs.  Write into the department policy that while the teachers can carry armed off duty, they can not exercise police powers out of uniform (while at school) unless responding to an extreme act of violence, or a dangerous accident.  Most departments already have such orders written in for their reserve officers, which means that the teacher can't arrest a student, if they find them with an ounce of pot, but they can in a manner to save their lives in an emergency.
 
2013-12-13 03:42:01 PM
"You'll shoot your eye out!"
 
2013-12-13 03:46:38 PM
Damn I figured all the posts would be about Police Academy. O well. Why the hell do those "police officers" look like paratroopers?
 
2013-12-13 03:49:56 PM
I hope they give everybody in Sun City and Sun City West a gun. I'll watch the jinks of a high nature from 250 miles away in the eastern part of Arizona.
 
2013-12-13 03:52:10 PM

ZAZ: Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque

Around here they aren't supposed to shoot people so they should be cheap to insure.


The article says that they're trained to the standards of hired officers, but even then it sounds like a massive civil rights lawsuit waiting to happen, unless they pretty much just stand around not really doing cop stuff.
 
2013-12-13 03:52:29 PM
A desert town with a Sheriff's Secret Police?  It's been done.

a1.mzstatic.com

ALL HAIL THE GLOW CLOUD!
 
2013-12-13 03:54:09 PM

Vlad_the_Inaner: [i.imgur.com image 450x298]


Hahaha! A buddy of mine split Curtis Sliwa's lip once after Curtis threw his knife into the Spokane River.
 
2013-12-13 03:57:28 PM
I do kind of like the idea of a dual-leveled police force. One that deals with low-level crap and one that deals with legit shiat like burglars and shootings. As is, having one group of people dealing with those different kinds of events with wildly different needs of observation and response doesn't seem ideal.
 
2013-12-13 03:58:34 PM

edmo: So who volunteers for this? Old retired people? Seems a shame that these aren't real jobs for real people with real bills to pay.


I knew a guy about 10 years ago who worked as the grocery manager full time and worked part time as a local volunteer policeman. This was in a town of about 3000, mostly old folks. I would say he was in his 30s at the time.

It may not work for every town, but it's not shameful for people, especially smaller towns, to come together as a community. I think it's way more shameful when communities can't seem to function without a unionized public work force funded by unduly high taxes. It's really about whatever works best in your neck of the woods.
 
2013-12-13 04:01:26 PM
Here it's REDDI. (Report Every Dangerous Driver Immediately)  Loosely organized bunch of volunteers that drive around at night reporting drunk drivers.

Not condemning what they do, but some of them can be a bit...vigilante in their approach.  Couple times now I have been driving at night and picked up one of these guys right on my rear bumper, cell phone in hand, just waiting...waaaaiiiiitiiiing for me to cross the center line.

Not that it would do them any good.  I do all my drinkin at home now boys.
 
2013-12-13 04:01:53 PM
The RCMP have been doing this for ages. Auxiliary officers generally do a lot of crowd control, special events, work with the regular constables on busy days, that sort of thing. It's a great program, and I know a number of people who have started as auxiliaries then gone on to become full officers later.
 
2013-12-13 04:20:46 PM
www.celebdirtylaundry.com
 
2013-12-13 04:22:02 PM
anxiously awaiting George Zimmerman II (electric clusterfarkaroo).
 
2013-12-13 04:37:15 PM

Mikey1969: edmo: So who volunteers for this? Old retired people? Seems a shame that these aren't real jobs for real people with real bills to pay.

And I'm sure the paid officers appreciate the comment about complaining.

That's the point of volunteer work... Sheriff Joe started this, and parts of it have worked well, the Pussy Posse(So named because they used to do prostitute stings) will beef up a presence in mall parking lots at Xmas time, and help cut down on car break-ins, including educating people that they see leaving packages out in the open as easy targets. Being Joe, he misuses the Posse a lot, but it's hard to complain about the Xmas part.


Even a broken clock is right twice a day.
 
2013-12-13 04:45:34 PM

shtychkn: Mikey1969: edmo: So who volunteers for this? Old retired people? Seems a shame that these aren't real jobs for real people with real bills to pay.

And I'm sure the paid officers appreciate the comment about complaining.

That's the point of volunteer work... Sheriff Joe started this, and parts of it have worked well, the Pussy Posse(So named because they used to do prostitute stings) will beef up a presence in mall parking lots at Xmas time, and help cut down on car break-ins, including educating people that they see leaving packages out in the open as easy targets. Being Joe, he misuses the Posse a lot, but it's hard to complain about the Xmas part.

Even a broken clock is right twice a day.


That's pretty much it..
 
2013-12-13 04:54:47 PM
My community has Reserver Officers, and Sheriff's Posse.    These people get badges and guns.   Most attend the police academy at some point, and want to work in Law Enforcement.    We also have a C.O.P. (Citizens on Patrol) unit.    These COPs are retired for the most part.   They drive around in old police cars.   They check to make sure all the doors are locked on businesses and government buildings.  They look for signs of vandalism or break-ins.    They will help direct traffic on car accident scenes.   The C.O.P.s get no badges, no guns, no enforcement ability at all.   They are the type of people who would volunteer for the neighborhood watch in a larger city.
 
2013-12-13 04:55:42 PM
weiserfireman: My community has Reserver Officers, Reserve Officers and Sheriff's Posse.    These people get badges and guns.   Most attend the police academy at some point, and want to work in Law Enforcement.    We also have a C.O.P. (Citizens on Patrol) unit.    These COPs are retired for the most part.   They drive around in old police cars.   They check to make sure all the doors are locked on businesses and government buildings.  They look for signs of vandalism or break-ins.    They will help direct traffic on car accident scenes.   The C.O.P.s get no badges, no guns, no enforcement ability at all.   They are the type of people who would volunteer for the neighborhood watch in a larger city.

Sorry, preview fail
 
2013-12-13 05:35:40 PM
There are really popular in China. It really smooths things over for every block to have its own semi-unofficial local ruler with the real power to tell everyone what to do and not to do as they personally see it required by society, like participate in the local patriotic lynch-oversized-pet-dogs mob.
 
2013-12-13 05:38:42 PM

SwiftFox: There are really popular in China. It really smooths things over for every block to have its own semi-unofficial local ruler with the real power to tell everyone what to do and not to do as they personally see it required by society, like participate in the local patriotic lynch-oversized-pet-dogs mob.


Hmm, that actually makes a lot of sense when you put it like that.    I wonder how I could get appointed to be my neighborhoods semi-official ruler.  I would like my own title, maybe Warlord, or Baron.

Makes it almost seem feudal in its simplicity.
 
2013-12-13 05:55:25 PM
upload.wikimedia.org

We're playing cops for real, and playing cops for free! And riiiiiiiide, ride, how we riiiiiiiiiiide
 
2013-12-13 05:55:50 PM
Impact : The lines at Dunkin are noticeably longer
 
2013-12-13 06:04:28 PM

shtychkn: Mikey1969: edmo: So who volunteers for this? Old retired people? Seems a shame that these aren't real jobs for real people with real bills to pay.

And I'm sure the paid officers appreciate the comment about complaining.

That's the point of volunteer work... Sheriff Joe started this, and parts of it have worked well, the Pussy Posse(So named because they used to do prostitute stings) will beef up a presence in mall parking lots at Xmas time, and help cut down on car break-ins, including educating people that they see leaving packages out in the open as easy targets. Being Joe, he misuses the Posse a lot, but it's hard to complain about the Xmas part.

Even a broken clock is right twice a day.


I forgot to mention.... We're still waiting for him to be right the second time...
 
2013-12-13 07:32:03 PM
Vigilante Volunteer Police departments is a GREAT idea.

/we just have to keep learning the same lessons over and over and over...
 
2013-12-13 08:27:02 PM

dj_bigbird: San Diego has the RSVP (Retired Senior Volunteer Program) that does stuff like this, too. I can't see why it's so revolutionary.


This. Far from being geriatric stormtroopers, you can pay them no mind. Curtail chachi88's nefarious activitahs they have not.
 
2013-12-13 10:14:35 PM

ChipNASA: [i.imgur.com image 640x411]



Spiderman, is that you???
 
2013-12-14 12:03:06 AM
A great opportunity for George Zimmerman to get that real policeman job he always wanted.
 
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