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(All Recipes)   Fark Food Thread: Let's dig into some Indian dishes. Do you stick to vegetarian? Northern vs Southern? All the Curry or Garam Masala? Knock out spices or mild? Make our eyes water and our tastebuds tingle to the right   (allrecipes.com) divider line 118
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1028 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Dec 2013 at 5:00 PM (30 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-12 05:22:37 PM
blogs.westword.com

So this idiot redneck I work with goes to an Indian Buffet with me. He looks at the stuff above and wrinkles up his nose and asks "what the effin hell is that???" So I tell him, Saag Paneer and he says"man, that's just gross", so I tell him it is really cheesy spinach and I was just messing with him. He responds, "No kidding???" and fills up half of his plate. The other half got covered with Tandoori Chicken (aka Indian BBQ Chicken, for the stupid redneck).

upload.wikimedia.org

He had a good time, but I have to make up appetizing names for stuff so the moron will try it.
 
2013-12-12 05:25:13 PM
www.mamas-spot.com
 
2013-12-12 05:33:03 PM
Came for mysore masala dosa mentions, leaving very dissatisfied.

South Indian >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> North Indian.
 
2013-12-12 05:33:14 PM
media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com
 
2013-12-12 05:35:44 PM
I myself prefer a nice, mild chicken tikka over jasmine rice. And I like my tikka to be in large portions in a large bowl.

Also: as to the whole dot vs feather bit, my brother said it best--"Indian? Slurpee or casino?"

/He may be a tad racist
 
2013-12-12 05:38:37 PM
I go to Indian restaurants for the naan. Everything else is just a bonus.
 
2013-12-12 05:38:38 PM
My Thanksgiving dinner was Chicken Tikka Masala.  Yes, I know that isn't a real traditional Indian dish, but it's my favorite.

I always tell them, "spicey, not gringo style".
 
2013-12-12 05:39:02 PM
Curry is the farking devil.
 
2013-12-12 05:39:42 PM
I love Northern Indian Punjabi style. Love me some Aloo Gobi. Not a huge fan of Southern Indian around Goa, etc. Went to an authentic one in New Jersey and was not a fan.
 
2013-12-12 05:40:16 PM

OgreMagi: My Thanksgiving dinner was Chicken Tikka Masala.  Yes, I know that isn't a real traditional Indian dish, but it's my favorite.

I always tell them, "spicey, not gringo style".


Because the kitchen employs strictly spanish speakers?
 
2013-12-12 05:41:43 PM
Just going a smidge northwards to Nepal.... Dal Bhat. All the yummy stuff of northern Indian cuisine and perhaps some Chinese, packaged into small tasty portions a'la bento boxes. With a corresponding farkton of rice.
 
2013-12-12 05:50:46 PM
I used to have the worst time ever eating Indian, until I found out that most of it is dairy heavy (I'm a lactose intolerant lady). Does anyone have any good non-dairy recipes?
 
2013-12-12 05:51:35 PM
Best thing about Dal Bhat... Sure, it's all these pretty and fragrent sauces and chutneys and pickled veggies and a big blop of rice... But you still end up mixing it together and eating it with your fingers! :) It's FOOD!
 
2013-12-12 05:52:33 PM

lewismarktwo: OgreMagi: My Thanksgiving dinner was Chicken Tikka Masala.  Yes, I know that isn't a real traditional Indian dish, but it's my favorite.

I always tell them, "spicey, not gringo style".

Because the kitchen employs strictly spanish speakers?


I was at a small Chinese place in Reno and as the waitress was getting off work, she yells back to the kitchen "¡adios amigos!"

/csb
 
2013-12-12 05:53:57 PM

lewismarktwo: OgreMagi: My Thanksgiving dinner was Chicken Tikka Masala.  Yes, I know that isn't a real traditional Indian dish, but it's my favorite.

I always tell them, "spicey, not gringo style".

Because the kitchen employs strictly spanish speakers?


I'm in California. Everyone knows at least that much Spanish.
 
2013-12-12 05:54:55 PM
I just buy the MTR and Swad brand microwaveable meals, and they're really good.  Cost under $2.00 apiece at any halfway decent international food store, and make my lunches at work a whole lot better.
 
2013-12-12 05:55:46 PM
I love Indian food and cook it quite a bit. I even like the twists of traditional stuff like this very simple baked spinach pakora recipe (which is close to what I do except I add more salt, chiles, and cook at 425 to get a crisper product) as well as doing Indian pizzas. I can't find a good online recipe for that but I just use a plain jane pizza dough recipe and then layer a thick curry on top.

Curries are a lot less intimidating when you realize that many of them use the exact same technique as making chili. Sear meat in pan and remove. Saute onions in same pan until brown. Add in fresh spices (like garlic, ginger, and fresh chiles) for a minute and then dry spices. Add liquid (beer for chili, tomatoes and/or yogurt for curry). Return meat to pan and cook until tender. For Indian pizza I replace the "return meat to pan" step with "pour curry over pizza dough" before cooking.
 
2013-12-12 05:56:47 PM
I've never been a huge fan. Some of the spices really just don't go together.

After working a huge Indian wedding, I won't touch it.

CSB time:  I watched 4 guys lugging in cooler after cooler of cooked dishes, and ingredients to cook on site.  Every single cooler was dumped on the bare cement outside while coming through the doors.  The clumsiest people I've ever watched.  That was just plain funny.  What wasn't: They picked everything up, scooping handfuls of sauce from the ground, right back into containers.  Time after time.  I am seriously talking about 4-5 coolers of food dropped and spilled, then laughingly picked up and put back in.  So casual and joking about it.  It made me wonder about their kitchen practices, too.  I work in the business.  I keep my Serv-Safe certification current.  That is nasty.

I still go nuts over a good Thai curry, though.  It's better when I don't have to make it.
 
2013-12-12 05:56:47 PM
Cannot, for the life of me, figure out why so many people like Indian food. Seems like assorted varieties of boring mush to me.
 
2013-12-12 06:00:03 PM
Scrummy indian pickles - like this punjabi mango pickle

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-12-12 06:00:37 PM

Trillian Astra: PolloDiablo: I love Indian food, like really really love it, but it's one of the few cuisines I just don't cook at home. I've bought the packaged Butter Chicken and Tiki Masala spice mixes before, and they work ok, but there's just way too many unfamiliar spices and ingredients I would have to buy to properly do it from scratch.

You can find every spice you need at a grocery store.


Sure, but the prices are obscene in an "American" grocery store.  Getting it from an Inidan/Asian (H-Mart) store it's like 20%
 
2013-12-12 06:01:45 PM
We used to make lots of naan at home, and no matter the recipe, it would never taste right.  We'd follow the recipe perfectly, put it in a hot oven with a pizza stone, and it would  lookperfect, but taste very different from the restaurant.  The outside would be crispy/hard, like a cracker crust.  Still tasty, but not what we wanted.

Then we cooked the same recipes in a cast-iron frying pan  on top ofthe stove, and why, the difference was magical.  Soft and chewy, just slightly blackened, almost exactly like from a tandoor (which I won't be buying anytime soon).  So that is my lesson for today: if you want good naan at home, use a cast-iron pan.
 
2013-12-12 06:04:58 PM
I'm still trying to find a good Malai Kofta recipe. Every one I've tried, the koftas fall apart.
 
2013-12-12 06:09:38 PM
#1 Indian food tip: Buy whole spices. Roast them up for a minute or two in a hot dry pan. Then grind them yourself.

There's no curry power in the world that you can buy that will be as good as freshly roasted and ground whole spices. The volatile compounds that give the spices much of their flavor do not survive long term storage. Even if you make your own curry powder, it will never be as tasty as the day it is ground.
 
2013-12-12 06:12:44 PM

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: My wife loves chicken tikka (yeah, not really an Indian dish, but whatever) and I've never been able to replicate it to restaurant levels. It always ends up coming out wrong.

Generally, though, I just fry up some onions, garlic, and cumin and go from there. Potatoes, chick peas and tomatoes cooked until they're done.


The restaurant secret is heavy cream and Hunts diced tomatos if anybody hasn't told you yet
 
2013-12-12 06:16:37 PM
I stick with doing the needful.
 
2013-12-12 06:17:53 PM
Lal Maas. Amazing, awesome stuff.


Bright red and as hot as the sun. The flavour and colour come entirely from the chillies. It's so awesome. You can make it less hot by using mild kashmiri peppers instead of the hotter varieties, but it's never less than firey. Had it in India a few years ago and have since figured out how to make it pretty well, Yum.
 
2013-12-12 06:19:45 PM
My major prof and his wife spent most of their lives in northern India and Nepal. When they moved to Florida, she would cook chickpeas with the "Spice Island" brand curry powder from the chain-store grocery.

For a while in Los Angeles we had an Indian restaurant that did a "Chinese" buffet on Friday nights. The dishes were a hybrid of what Americans think of as Indian and Chinese. Whenever a fresh batch of Manchurian Cauliflower came out of the kitchen, all the customers would pounce on it.
 
2013-12-12 06:20:44 PM
 
2013-12-12 06:24:49 PM
I used to live just off Devon Avenue in Chicago, I was in heaven.  Now I sit here with my sad little attempts at Indian food and weep.  We have made some really good samosas but miss on the chutney, and I have made some decent naan, but the kids don't like the spicy stuff and so its hit or miss on the curries.
 
2013-12-12 06:34:44 PM
I found a recipe for saag paneer on the Webbernets and managed to do a pretty good job of it at home, although I decided to use ground cinnamon instead of toasting actual cinnamon sticks. Protip: the main herb associated with the flavor of saag paneer is fenugreek.
 
2013-12-12 06:35:29 PM

interstellar_tedium: I used to live just off Devon Avenue in Chicago, I was in heaven.  Now I sit here with my sad little attempts at Indian food and weep.  We have made some really good samosas but miss on the chutney, and I have made some decent naan, but the kids don't like the spicy stuff and so its hit or miss on the curries.


I only visited there once but I still miss it. The food there was so incredibly good.
 
2013-12-12 06:38:44 PM
I can't believe that an American fast food place hasn't exploited samosas.  Typically they're deep fried but we use puff pastry sheets and bake them: it doesn't sacrifice any taste.  They're great with salsa.

I'm looking for a recipe for Punjabi eggplant.


---

Samosas

Dough - use puff pastry sheets; defrost and roll flat.  Cut into squares for crust.

Spicy meat filling - enough for 2 batches
1 lb. ground beef
1 medium onion, chopped fine
1 tomato, chopped
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon red or green chillies - chopped
1 teaspoon coriander seeds, roasted and ground
1 teaspoon cumin seeds, roasted and ground
2 tablespoons garlic
2 tablespoons ginger, fresh grated
½ teaspoon curry powder (or to taste)
1 tablespoon oil
¼ cup peas
¼ cup chopped carrots (optional)
½ cup water

1. Cook the meat in a skillet with a little vegetable oil.
2. In a hot cast iron frying pan, put the cumin and coriander seeds.  Toss for about 30 seconds, then remove seeds and grind in a pestle.
3. Combine all ingredients and cook until water is completely absorbed.  Let stuffing cool.
4. Place meat into pastry, fold to form triangle.  Use egg wash (egg + 2 teaspoons water, whipped) to seal - and fork to press sides together.
5. Bake at package directions on dough until browned.
6. Serve with salsa, chipotle salsa.
 
2013-12-12 06:38:50 PM
[notepad in hand, waits patiently for a good paneer recipe]
[and any other that looks tasty...]

/seriously, my attempts at paneer look like badly-made cottage cheese
 
2013-12-12 06:40:23 PM
The magic ingredient most non-Indians cooking Indian food at home overlook: Ghee.

When you make Indian food at home do you ever think it is missing something compared to what you get at your favorite Indian place? Some extra depth of flavor, a certain savory nuttiness? It's because you are cooking with oil, and they are cooking with Ghee.

What is ghee? Basically, it's a type of clarified butter.

Where do I get some of this ghee? Well, you can find it in Asian markets or online. However if you've got butter, you can make it yourself.

Okay, so how do I make ghee? It can be amazingly simple. Get a saucepan. Drop a few sticks of unsalted butter into it and put it over the heat until it melts and simmers. Then just stand back. A fine foam will form on top of the simmering butter. Then this foam will die down. Then a second more coarse and bubbly foam will appear. It too will start to subside after a little more time, indicating you're about done. After about 20 minutes of simmering you should see all the milk solids in the butter have collect on the bottom of the pan. They should be getting a nice golden brown to brick red color around the same time the foam starts to subside. It is those milk solids browning that gives the ghee its special nutty aroma. With the solids browned and the foam almost finished, take it off the heat. Let it cool a little (so as not to shatter the container it will be going into) and then run through a sieve (or cheesecloth) as you pour it into a container so that you get just the liquid and not the solids. (Note: this is for a basic butter ghee which isn't really truly ghee according to my Indian friends, but it's close enough for me. There's a more authentic and advanced technique that starts from cream, takes all day, and requires a hot climate.)

Once it's in the jar and has cooled more, stick your nose in the jar and take a big whiff of the aroma. It should smell like butter candy (note, it does not taste like butter candy).

It should solidify as it cools. You can keep it in the fridge, but since it has most of its water boiled out of it ghee will remain fresh for a really long time even at room temperature. Another advantage is that the smoke point of ghee is very high, so it's great to use when woking things under very high heat.

Cook up your onions and garlic in the ghee instead of butter or oil. You will taste the difference in your curry.
 
2013-12-12 06:40:48 PM

whither_apophis: lewismarktwo: OgreMagi: My Thanksgiving dinner was Chicken Tikka Masala.  Yes, I know that isn't a real traditional Indian dish, but it's my favorite.

I always tell them, "spicey, not gringo style".

Because the kitchen employs strictly spanish speakers?

I was at a small Chinese place in Reno and as the waitress was getting off work, she yells back to the kitchen "¡adios amigos!"

/csb


OgreMagi: lewismarktwo: OgreMagi: My Thanksgiving dinner was Chicken Tikka Masala.  Yes, I know that isn't a real traditional Indian dish, but it's my favorite.

I always tell them, "spicey, not gringo style".

Because the kitchen employs strictly spanish speakers?

I'm in California. Everyone knows at least that much Spanish.


Yeah, that's what I was getting at.  Chinese and Indian restaurants always seem to have quite a few 'spanish speakers'.
 
2013-12-12 06:41:23 PM
*in the kitchen.
 
2013-12-12 06:43:44 PM
Give me your butter chicken recipes, Farkers!!
 
2013-12-12 06:46:50 PM

Dutch Pilsner: When buying vindaloo paste remember to cut it with tomato paste and/or tomatoes.

Made that mistake once.


Pussy.
 
2013-12-12 06:51:08 PM

maniacbastard: So this idiot redneck I work with goes to an Indian Buffet with me. He looks at the stuff above and wrinkles up his nose and asks "what the effin hell is that???" So I tell him, Saag Paneer and he says"man, that's just gross", so I tell him it is really cheesy spinach and I was just messing with him. He responds, "No kidding???" and fills up half of his plate. The other half got covered with Tandoori Chicken (aka Indian BBQ Chicken, for the stupid redneck).


I work with two brothers whose parents are very conservative folks who moved to Florida to live in a gated community. When they come visit, they like to serve them "chicken and noodles" and "BBQ beef tips" from takeout instead of pad thai and sesame beef.
 
2013-12-12 06:52:38 PM

Chabash: Give me your butter chicken recipes, Farkers!!


Here you go.  It's surprisingly easy.
 
2013-12-12 07:25:59 PM

Creoena: I stick with doing the needful.


I am told to do the needful every day. I have started asking others to do the needful.

Even though I work with our Indian branch (which is, ya know, on the other side of the world) we only have 1 Indian restaurant in our town and I have eaten there... once. It is a pretty sad situation. I hear endless good things about Indian food.. and... I have 0 places to get it.
 
2013-12-12 07:38:10 PM

spidermilk: Creoena: I stick with doing the needful.

I am told to do the needful every day. I have started asking others to do the needful.

Even though I work with our Indian branch (which is, ya know, on the other side of the world) we only have 1 Indian restaurant in our town and I have eaten there... once. It is a pretty sad situation. I hear endless good things about Indian food.. and... I have 0 places to get it.


Yeah, I have had zero happy Indian food experiences.  Ever.  I don't live in the UK, so my phonebook has many other options for take out.  I have never thought, "I really need some bhaji, vindaloo or a masala, within 15 minutes!"  I'd rather not have any of them for as long as I live.  If you crave this, good luck.  I can enjoy the flavor profiles, but I cannot help but wonder about the sanitation.  To be fair to my earlier post about Indian saniation standards:   I still expect worse standards from Mexican or Thai, but at least they understand basic flavor profiles.
 
2013-12-12 07:40:15 PM
The place near me does some fantastic lamb dishes, especially the vindaloo. The sheer depth of flavor and spice is just amazing. And now I want some, and I already ate dinner. Plus some naan.
 
2013-12-12 07:41:29 PM

MylesHeartVodak: I still expect worse standards from Mexican or Thai, but at least they understand basic flavor profiles.


That's not racist.
 
2013-12-12 08:41:20 PM
How to tell if the Indian restaurant you are in is run by Pakistanis:  order the Curried Beef.

Lamb's good, too. I love lamb.

I like vegetarian Indian food but I can't remember what it's called, even after years of eating it whenever I can get it.

Baba Yaga? Nope.
Paneer Parthanon? Nope.
Papageno! Papageno! Nope.

I solve this lapsus by reading the menu, or failing that, by having everything. It's the pig's way out of a poke.
 
2013-12-12 08:41:51 PM

khyberkitsune: Curry, Curry, and MORE Curry. A good mix of bloomed and raw curry at the right times makes EVERY BIT of difference in the world.

/bloom first, add some raw later when the stock/milk is added, add more bloomed right before dropping in bay leaf.
//don't forget the sesame oil
///would cook tonight but made himself sick losing $8,000


Sorry to hear that.
Losing $$ always makes me lose appetite as well.

/looking forward to your next cooking class
 
2013-12-12 08:46:07 PM
Insert "not bads" and insults here.

i.imgur.com
 
2013-12-12 09:09:05 PM
Indian food - loving it. Whatever the slop is in it. It's delicious.
 
2013-12-12 09:19:34 PM

maniacbastard: [blogs.westword.com image 640x480]

So this idiot redneck I work with goes to an Indian Buffet with me. He looks at the stuff above and wrinkles up his nose and asks "what the effin hell is that???" So I tell him, Saag Paneer and he says"man, that's just gross", so I tell him it is really cheesy spinach and I was just messing with him. He responds, "No kidding???" and fills up half of his plate. The other half got covered with Tandoori Chicken (aka Indian BBQ Chicken, for the stupid redneck).

[upload.wikimedia.org image 480x640]

He had a good time, but I have to make up appetizing names for stuff so the moron will try it.


Doing your part to make the world a better place to live....DOTS OFF TO YOU!!!
 
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