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(All Recipes)   Fark Food Thread: Let's dig into some Indian dishes. Do you stick to vegetarian? Northern vs Southern? All the Curry or Garam Masala? Knock out spices or mild? Make our eyes water and our tastebuds tingle to the right   (allrecipes.com) divider line 118
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1042 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Dec 2013 at 5:00 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-12 03:38:42 PM  
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-12-12 03:41:59 PM  
Nope. Can't do it. Not after the last thread. Can. Not. Do. Food.
 
2013-12-12 03:42:33 PM  
My go to order (with my husband) is chicken tikka masala, saag or mutter paneer, and basmati rice. Veggie pakoras if we're feeling pekish. Plus beer and/or wine.

I avoid naan for glycemic reasons but holy f*ck is it good.

We mix it up sometimes, though. Tandoori is often delicious. Lamb biryani is another favorite.
 
2013-12-12 03:43:26 PM  
I had shrimp vindaloo for the first time recently and it was great. REALLY hot, but great.

Now I want Indian food.
 
2013-12-12 03:44:24 PM  
My wife makes coconut chicken curry that is f*cking awesome.
 
2013-12-12 03:44:31 PM  
roaringtiger.files.wordpress.com

www.deshigrub.com
 
2013-12-12 03:45:40 PM  
My wife loves chicken tikka (yeah, not really an Indian dish, but whatever) and I've never been able to replicate it to restaurant levels. It always ends up coming out wrong.

Generally, though, I just fry up some onions, garlic, and cumin and go from there. Potatoes, chick peas and tomatoes cooked until they're done.
 
2013-12-12 03:46:14 PM  
I had buffalo steak once....that's Indian food....right?
 
2013-12-12 03:46:33 PM  
For some reason the ring of fire thread below has put me off Indian food.
 
2013-12-12 03:49:47 PM  
There used to be an Indian takeout place across the street from my office.

Then the city shutdown the building because contractors had done a whole sh*tload of structural work with no permits. The whole mess is tied up in the courts right now and it's ridiculously complicated.

Anyway, their butter chicken was excellent and their pakoras, OMG, I could eat like 50 of them....or try.

/Cool Hand Rev
 
2013-12-12 03:51:06 PM  

Rev.K: There used to be an Indian takeout place across the street from my office.

Then the city shutdown the building because contractors had done a whole sh*tload of structural work with no permits. The whole mess is tied up in the courts right now and it's ridiculously complicated.


One of the ones I used to go to got dinged by the health inspector for keeping their food at unsafe temperatures and for a proliferation of roaches.

Haven't been back since.
 
2013-12-12 03:51:08 PM  
I love Indian food, like really really love it, but it's one of the few cuisines I just don't cook at home. I've bought the packaged Butter Chicken and Tiki Masala spice mixes before, and they work ok, but there's just way too many unfamiliar spices and ingredients I would have to buy to properly do it from scratch.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-12-12 03:54:24 PM  

PolloDiablo: I love Indian food, like really really love it, but it's one of the few cuisines I just don't cook at home. I've bought the packaged Butter Chicken and Tiki Masala spice mixes before, and they work ok, but there's just way too many unfamiliar spices and ingredients I would have to buy to properly do it from scratch.


I love it, too... and as much as I want to try cooking it at home... yeah, no. Wifey gets sick to her stomach smelling that combination of scents and just farking forget eating it. So if I want an Indian fix I have to go out and get it.

Which sucks. Lamb biryani? Channa Masala? Tikka Massala? Fresh garlic naan? Tandoori chicken with some hot samosas?

/now sad.
 
2013-12-12 03:55:08 PM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: One of the ones I used to go to got dinged by the health inspector for keeping their food at unsafe temperatures and for a proliferation of roaches.

Haven't been back since.


In my case, it wasn't the establishment's fault.

The building is connected to a condo and there are numerous vendors on the ground floor. The property management company hired a contractor to re-do the parking garage which sits atop the street-level vendors.

The contractor got no permits whatsoever and proceeded with structural work on the parking garage.

I don't know what's taking so long, that was over two years ago and there's not a goddamn f*cking hope that the contractor isn't going to lose their shirts.

But I guess that's why I'm not a lawyer.
 
2013-12-12 03:55:35 PM  

PolloDiablo: I love Indian food, like really really love it, but it's one of the few cuisines I just don't cook at home. I've bought the packaged Butter Chicken and Tiki Masala spice mixes before, and they work ok, but there's just way too many unfamiliar spices and ingredients I would have to buy to properly do it from scratch.


You can find every spice you need at a grocery store.
 
2013-12-12 03:55:36 PM  
I do love a good daal.
 
2013-12-12 03:56:52 PM  

Trillian Astra: PolloDiablo: I love Indian food, like really really love it, but it's one of the few cuisines I just don't cook at home. I've bought the packaged Butter Chicken and Tiki Masala spice mixes before, and they work ok, but there's just way too many unfamiliar spices and ingredients I would have to buy to properly do it from scratch.

You can find every spice you need at a grocery store.


Or find an Indian grocery. There's at least one in every sizeable city in the country.

Although I have the same handicap as DGS does... wife can't stand the smell of it.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-12-12 03:59:41 PM  

make me some tea: Although I have the same handicap as DGS does... wife can't stand the smell of it.


It's brutal! I look for excuses to go out and get some. Hell, I even arranged a couple Fark dinner nights in Brooklyn for exactly that reason.

/which reminds me... I see another one coming in January since wifey won't have classes/homework every night
 
2013-12-12 04:00:52 PM  

make me some tea: Trillian Astra: PolloDiablo: I love Indian food, like really really love it, but it's one of the few cuisines I just don't cook at home. I've bought the packaged Butter Chicken and Tiki Masala spice mixes before, and they work ok, but there's just way too many unfamiliar spices and ingredients I would have to buy to properly do it from scratch.

You can find every spice you need at a grocery store.

Or find an Indian grocery. There's at least one in every sizeable city in the country.

Although I have the same handicap as DGS does... wife can't stand the smell of it.


hey...she got used to you...tell her to give it time...
 
2013-12-12 04:02:09 PM  

make me some tea: Although I have the same handicap as DGS does... wife can't stand the smell of it.


I almost lost my love of Indian food after spending a nine hour flight from Heathrow to Atlanta where the meal was fish curry. The flight still stank of fish curry when we disembarked.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-12-12 04:02:42 PM  

plmyfngr: make me some tea: Trillian Astra: PolloDiablo: I love Indian food, like really really love it, but it's one of the few cuisines I just don't cook at home. I've bought the packaged Butter Chicken and Tiki Masala spice mixes before, and they work ok, but there's just way too many unfamiliar spices and ingredients I would have to buy to properly do it from scratch.

You can find every spice you need at a grocery store.

Or find an Indian grocery. There's at least one in every sizeable city in the country.

Although I have the same handicap as DGS does... wife can't stand the smell of it.

hey...she got used to you...tell her to give it time...


Zing!

/oh wait
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-12-12 04:03:39 PM  

Trillian Astra: make me some tea: Although I have the same handicap as DGS does... wife can't stand the smell of it.

I almost lost my love of Indian food after spending a nine hour flight from Heathrow to Atlanta where the meal was fish curry. The flight still stank of fish curry when we disembarked.


That... sounds brutal. And I thought everyone knew not to have the fish on the flight.

/learned jive for this reason, too
 
2013-12-12 04:05:19 PM  
This recipe for pressure cooker pork vindaloo was stupidly easy and really really good.  Not super spicy, but you can adjust the spices as you see fit.
farm3.staticflickr.com
 
2013-12-12 04:06:56 PM  

DGS: That... sounds brutal. And I thought everyone knew not to have the fish on the flight.


It was fish or chicken and apparently there were a lot of people who went fish. Even the gluten free option was curry which sucked for my boyfriend because coriander f*cks his stomach up really bad.
 
2013-12-12 04:55:04 PM  

plmyfngr: make me some tea: Trillian Astra: PolloDiablo: I love Indian food, like really really love it, but it's one of the few cuisines I just don't cook at home. I've bought the packaged Butter Chicken and Tiki Masala spice mixes before, and they work ok, but there's just way too many unfamiliar spices and ingredients I would have to buy to properly do it from scratch.

You can find every spice you need at a grocery store.

Or find an Indian grocery. There's at least one in every sizeable city in the country.

Although I have the same handicap as DGS does... wife can't stand the smell of it.

hey...she got used to you...tell her to give it time...


LOL indeed.

One of the nice things about these new digs we're in, I can close off both doors to the kitchen and keep my stenches out of the rest of the house. Never had that luxury before. It will keep the peace when I decide to delve into curry again.
 
2013-12-12 04:59:52 PM  

Trillian Astra: DGS: That... sounds brutal. And I thought everyone knew not to have the fish on the flight.

It was fish or chicken and apparently there were a lot of people who went fish. Even the gluten free option was curry which sucked for my boyfriend because coriander f*cks his stomach up really bad.


I love fish curry. I think it's my favorite curry.
 
2013-12-12 05:01:47 PM  
Dosa please!

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: My wife loves chicken tikka (yeah, not really an Indian dish, but whatever) and I've never been able to replicate it to restaurant levels. It always ends up coming out wrong.

Generally, though, I just fry up some onions, garlic, and cumin and go from there. Potatoes, chick peas and tomatoes cooked until they're done.


I have a go-to Indian dish along those lines. It also features spinach and some broiled potatoes.
 
2013-12-12 05:03:40 PM  

ahab: This recipe for pressure cooker pork vindaloo was stupidly easy and really really good.  Not super spicy, but you can adjust the spices as you see fit.
[farm3.staticflickr.com image 800x534]


Wonder how it will work with some lamb or goat...
 
2013-12-12 05:04:14 PM  

missmez: For some reason the ring of fire thread below has put me off Indian food.


Yeah, the timing of the two threads is not ideal.
 
2013-12-12 05:05:19 PM  
I am in desperate need of a good korma or pasanda recipe!!! There were a couple places in Florida that made it like heaven.
Most of the Indian food in Tennessee tastes like shiat. No matter what I do, it doesn't come out right when I make it.

I'm usually really good at eating something then making it, but Indian food just does not compute I guess.

/sad face
 
2013-12-12 05:06:17 PM  
playerpianosara.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-12-12 05:06:29 PM  
l2.yimg.com

Wait! Guys, they meant dots, not feathers! No need to stampede!
 
2013-12-12 05:06:44 PM  
Rogan josh is dang tasty
 
2013-12-12 05:07:16 PM  
One word: Naan

That's all.
 
2013-12-12 05:08:58 PM  
I'm not that experienced, but I've always enjoyed it I've gone out for it.

I've never made it at home from scratch. I used to get a pound of chicken and the Trader Joes simmer sauce, put it over rice & peas with some TJ lentils and naan & it's a meal.

With a couple kids and a couple jobs, I go even lazier now. This week we had the Chicken Tiki & Butter Chicken, Samosa's and Naan. I'm sure the purists will deride me, but after when I'm cooking 7 meals a week and always pressed for time, this is a wonderful break from putting something together from scratch.

But I'd love to hear other recipes or suggestions.
 
2013-12-12 05:09:08 PM  
Chicken Tikka Masala Copy Pasta
 SLOW COOKER SIZE: 5-QUART • COOKING TIME: AT LEAST 2 HOURS TO MARINATE, THEN 6 TO 8 HOURS ON HIGH
• YIELD: 14 CUPS (3.31 L)

There are many theories for how this dish came about. One is that a Bangladeshi-British chef in the United Kingdom came up with the idea to add tomatoes and cream to the original tandoor-cooked chicken and masala. Regardless, the popularity of chicken tikka masala in the West, especially in Great Britain, is undisputable.

 I modified the recipe for the slow cooker and eliminated the step of first grilling the chicken. It still tastes great. If you prefer, grill the chicken before adding it. But try it my way first-you may just find you like it and don't want to bother with the extra step.
 Chicken:
2 cups (473 mL) plain yogurt
3 tablespoons (44 mL) lemon juice
1 (1-inch [2.5 cm]) piece ginger, peeled
and grated
5 cloves garlic, peeled and grated
1 tablespoon (15 mL) red chili powder
1 tablespoon (15 mL) paprika
1 teaspoon-1 tablespoon (5-15 mL) red
chili powder
2 teaspoons (10 mL) ground cinnamon
2 teaspoons (10 mL) black pepper
2 teaspoons (10 mL) salt
3 pounds (1.36 kg) boneless, skinless
chicken, cut into 2-inch pieces

 1. Whisk together all the ingredients except the chicken in a deep mixing bowl. Add the chicken and mix gently until all the pieces are coated.
 2. Cover and refrigerate at least 2 hours, or, ideally, overnight.
 Masala:
6 medium tomatoes
3 medium yellow or red onions, peeled and
cut into large pieces
6 cloves garlic, peeled
4-6 green Thai, serrano, or cayenne
chilies, stems removed
2 (6 oz [50 g]) cans tomato paste
2 tablespoons (30 mL)
garam masala
2 tablespoons (30 mL) ground coriander
1 tablespoon (15 mL) red chili powder
1 tablespoon (15 mL) salt
1 tablespoon (15 mL) brown sugar
3 tablespoons (44 mL) blanched sliced
almonds (optional)
1 teaspoon (5 mL) ground cinnamon
½ cup (125 mL) water
6 cardamom pods, crushed slightly in a
mortar and pestle
1 cup (250 mL) heavy cream
1 cup (201 g) chopped fresh cilantro
Chopped onions, for garnish
Chopped green chilies, for garnish

 1. Bring a pot of water to a boil on the stovetop. Cut an X into the non-stem end of each tomato with a sharp knife and add the tomatoes to the boiling water. Cook for about 2 minutes, or until the peel starts to curl back. Pull the tomatoes out of the water with tongs, allow them to cool, and peel them. Roughly chop the tomatoes.
 2. In a food processor grind the onions, garlic, green chilies, tomato paste, garam masala, coriander, red chili powder, salt, brown sugar, almonds, cinnamon, and water until completely smooth. Be patient, as this might take 10-15 minutes. Stop and scrape down the sides as needed.
 3. Add the tomatoes to the food processor and pulse a few times until they break down but are not completely blended. Put this mixture in the slow cooker, along with the crushed cardamom pods.
 4. Using a slotted spoon or tongs, slowly add the marinated chicken to the slow cooker. Discard the remaining marinade to make a thicker base for the chicken, or add it to the slow cooker for a thinner masala.
 5. Cook on high for 6 to 8 hours. If you want an even thicker sauce, remove the lid an hour before the cooking time ends.
 6. Add the cream and cilantro. Garnish with the chopped onions and green chilis. Serve with roti or naan.


Try This! If you want to add another layer of flavor to the dish, brown the marinated chicken in oil on the stovetop before adding it to the slow cooker. You can also grill the chicken after marinating and serve it with toothpicks as an appetizer.

 To make this dish in a 3½-quart slow cooker, halve all the ingredients and proceed with the recipe. A half recipe makes 7 cups (1.66 mL).
 
2013-12-12 05:10:30 PM  
May I humbly suggest

http://oneworldplate.com/category/indian/

NOT (repeat) NOT my site, but a friend's, he can get you up on some basic Indian to get you started if you're a little intimidated.
 
2013-12-12 05:11:03 PM  
I was taught to cook Indian by my Indian neighbor from Delhi. Restaurant food is good, but the homestyle dishes....oh man. It's hard to beat good homestyle Indian. One of my favorite recipes.

Egg Curry

(this is quick, easy curry good for weeknights)

Sautee some whole cumin, coriander, and cloves in some oil.
When you start to smell them, add in some chopped onion.
When the onion is getting done (clear), add in some ginger, garlic, and chile.
When that's done, add in a can of tomatoes and some water to make a fairly thick curry sauce.
When the tomatoes get done, break five eggs onto the curry sauce, and let them sit, poaching in the sauce.
Serve with roti or rice.
 
2013-12-12 05:11:49 PM  
 
2013-12-12 05:12:05 PM  
Maybe a bookmark :)
 
2013-12-12 05:12:26 PM  
When buying vindaloo paste remember to cut it with tomato paste and/or tomatoes.

Made that mistake once.
 
2013-12-12 05:14:18 PM  
We call it maize.

i1.ytimg.com
 
2013-12-12 05:14:21 PM  
Roti/Naan:
Naan can be found in most grocery stores, while roti is more readily available at an Indian grocer. Keep in mind that roti is the healthiest option, as it's made with whole-wheat flour. Naan can also be healthy if you purchase a whole-wheat version.

 To make my own roti, I usually mix the dough in my food processor. The proportion that works best for me is 3 cups (603 g) aata to 1½ cups (354 mL) water and 1 tablespoon vegetable or canola oil. I blend the mixture until it becomes a sticky ball, much like pizza dough. Then I knead it on my clean countertop, which has been prepped with a thin layer of dry aata. Pull off small balls, about 2 inches in diameter, dip them into dry aata, and roll them out with a rolling pin into thin circles. Cook on a preheated, flat frying pan until browned on both sides. Stack the rotis as you finish cooking them. They'll keep in the fridge for about a week. Use chapati 100% percent whole-wheat flour from an Indian grocery store for the best results.
 
2013-12-12 05:14:40 PM  
A place in northern Palm Beach County had a dish called Maharaja chicken.  It was creamy and mild, and I think it had yellow raisins in it.  I made my husband pick it up several times when I was pregnant.  I wish I had the recipe.
 
2013-12-12 05:14:53 PM  
Curry, Curry, and MORE Curry. A good mix of bloomed and raw curry at the right times makes EVERY BIT of difference in the world.

/bloom first, add some raw later when the stock/milk is added, add more bloomed right before dropping in bay leaf.
//don't forget the sesame oil
///would cook tonight but made himself sick losing $8,000
 
2013-12-12 05:14:54 PM  
I love Indian. I'll eat north or south Indian. Vegetarian only.
As with others, my gf is not the biggest fan. So its a rare treat for me to go to a really good Indian restaurant. I cook it at hone once in a while.

My favorite restaurant used to have "lasun ki gobi" if I'm spelling it right. Anyway its breaded and lightly fried cauliflower in sauce. It is amazing. Unfortunately they don't make it anymore.
 
2013-12-12 05:16:14 PM  
I think most of the high points have been hit already.

As a meal, i do love white rice topped with mutton vindaloo. You need a cucumber raita and lassi (butter milk) to make sure the vindaloo does burn through your system.

I like the papadum (paper-thin hard bread).
There's this nice potato and chickpea mix with spices and herbs. You shovel it in with a piece of bread. Can't remember the name.

Indian style kebabs are also nice.

Never was one for the Tikka, truth be told.

I go for butter chicken if I feel the need to take it easy (spice-wise).
 
2013-12-12 05:19:22 PM  
I make curries on a fairly regular basis at home. I used to buy the dried spice mixes in a box (korma, rogan josh, vindaloo, etc) but then I started buying the individual spices from an Indian store here in Chas, WV. I do kinda non traditional curries now, instead of following recipes. The only time I cook a more traditional curry is when I do vindaloo but even then I use huge chunks of ginger and garlic, slivers of red onion instead of mincing or pureeing it. I make every curry rediculously hot. I used to use habaneros for heat but finally I can get fresh bhut jolokia (ghost peppers) here. I had the dish Phall from the Brick Lane Curry House in Manhattan once. They wear a gas mask to prepare it. Had to sign a waiver. Finished it in under an hour and recieved a certificate and a free beer. Felt like I had been kicked in the stomach by a horse afterward. It was so hot you couldn't really taste it. The waitress asked if I wanted it with chicken, lamb, or shrimp and I said "it's not really going to matter is it?". She shook her head no.
 
2013-12-12 05:19:48 PM  
I get a Vindaloo, no protein, just rice.  Yum.
 
2013-12-12 05:20:44 PM  
I make a kemar mataar that is quite good. Mostly it is the quality of the curry you use. Its a dish that has spuds, peas, tomato, curry powder, cumin, onion ( i have used leeks too)..I use lamb, ground,when I make it. Veery good!
 
2013-12-12 05:22:37 PM  
blogs.westword.com

So this idiot redneck I work with goes to an Indian Buffet with me. He looks at the stuff above and wrinkles up his nose and asks "what the effin hell is that???" So I tell him, Saag Paneer and he says"man, that's just gross", so I tell him it is really cheesy spinach and I was just messing with him. He responds, "No kidding???" and fills up half of his plate. The other half got covered with Tandoori Chicken (aka Indian BBQ Chicken, for the stupid redneck).

upload.wikimedia.org

He had a good time, but I have to make up appetizing names for stuff so the moron will try it.
 
2013-12-12 05:25:13 PM  
www.mamas-spot.com
 
2013-12-12 05:33:03 PM  
Came for mysore masala dosa mentions, leaving very dissatisfied.

South Indian >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> North Indian.
 
2013-12-12 05:33:14 PM  
media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com
 
2013-12-12 05:35:44 PM  
I myself prefer a nice, mild chicken tikka over jasmine rice. And I like my tikka to be in large portions in a large bowl.

Also: as to the whole dot vs feather bit, my brother said it best--"Indian? Slurpee or casino?"

/He may be a tad racist
 
2013-12-12 05:38:37 PM  
I go to Indian restaurants for the naan. Everything else is just a bonus.
 
2013-12-12 05:38:38 PM  
My Thanksgiving dinner was Chicken Tikka Masala.  Yes, I know that isn't a real traditional Indian dish, but it's my favorite.

I always tell them, "spicey, not gringo style".
 
2013-12-12 05:39:02 PM  
Curry is the farking devil.
 
2013-12-12 05:39:42 PM  
I love Northern Indian Punjabi style. Love me some Aloo Gobi. Not a huge fan of Southern Indian around Goa, etc. Went to an authentic one in New Jersey and was not a fan.
 
2013-12-12 05:40:16 PM  

OgreMagi: My Thanksgiving dinner was Chicken Tikka Masala.  Yes, I know that isn't a real traditional Indian dish, but it's my favorite.

I always tell them, "spicey, not gringo style".


Because the kitchen employs strictly spanish speakers?
 
2013-12-12 05:41:43 PM  
Just going a smidge northwards to Nepal.... Dal Bhat. All the yummy stuff of northern Indian cuisine and perhaps some Chinese, packaged into small tasty portions a'la bento boxes. With a corresponding farkton of rice.
 
2013-12-12 05:50:46 PM  
I used to have the worst time ever eating Indian, until I found out that most of it is dairy heavy (I'm a lactose intolerant lady). Does anyone have any good non-dairy recipes?
 
2013-12-12 05:51:35 PM  
Best thing about Dal Bhat... Sure, it's all these pretty and fragrent sauces and chutneys and pickled veggies and a big blop of rice... But you still end up mixing it together and eating it with your fingers! :) It's FOOD!
 
2013-12-12 05:52:33 PM  

lewismarktwo: OgreMagi: My Thanksgiving dinner was Chicken Tikka Masala.  Yes, I know that isn't a real traditional Indian dish, but it's my favorite.

I always tell them, "spicey, not gringo style".

Because the kitchen employs strictly spanish speakers?


I was at a small Chinese place in Reno and as the waitress was getting off work, she yells back to the kitchen "¡adios amigos!"

/csb
 
2013-12-12 05:53:57 PM  

lewismarktwo: OgreMagi: My Thanksgiving dinner was Chicken Tikka Masala.  Yes, I know that isn't a real traditional Indian dish, but it's my favorite.

I always tell them, "spicey, not gringo style".

Because the kitchen employs strictly spanish speakers?


I'm in California. Everyone knows at least that much Spanish.
 
2013-12-12 05:54:55 PM  
I just buy the MTR and Swad brand microwaveable meals, and they're really good.  Cost under $2.00 apiece at any halfway decent international food store, and make my lunches at work a whole lot better.
 
2013-12-12 05:55:46 PM  
I love Indian food and cook it quite a bit. I even like the twists of traditional stuff like this very simple baked spinach pakora recipe (which is close to what I do except I add more salt, chiles, and cook at 425 to get a crisper product) as well as doing Indian pizzas. I can't find a good online recipe for that but I just use a plain jane pizza dough recipe and then layer a thick curry on top.

Curries are a lot less intimidating when you realize that many of them use the exact same technique as making chili. Sear meat in pan and remove. Saute onions in same pan until brown. Add in fresh spices (like garlic, ginger, and fresh chiles) for a minute and then dry spices. Add liquid (beer for chili, tomatoes and/or yogurt for curry). Return meat to pan and cook until tender. For Indian pizza I replace the "return meat to pan" step with "pour curry over pizza dough" before cooking.
 
2013-12-12 05:56:47 PM  
I've never been a huge fan. Some of the spices really just don't go together.

After working a huge Indian wedding, I won't touch it.

CSB time:  I watched 4 guys lugging in cooler after cooler of cooked dishes, and ingredients to cook on site.  Every single cooler was dumped on the bare cement outside while coming through the doors.  The clumsiest people I've ever watched.  That was just plain funny.  What wasn't: They picked everything up, scooping handfuls of sauce from the ground, right back into containers.  Time after time.  I am seriously talking about 4-5 coolers of food dropped and spilled, then laughingly picked up and put back in.  So casual and joking about it.  It made me wonder about their kitchen practices, too.  I work in the business.  I keep my Serv-Safe certification current.  That is nasty.

I still go nuts over a good Thai curry, though.  It's better when I don't have to make it.
 
2013-12-12 05:56:47 PM  
Cannot, for the life of me, figure out why so many people like Indian food. Seems like assorted varieties of boring mush to me.
 
2013-12-12 06:00:03 PM  
Scrummy indian pickles - like this punjabi mango pickle

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-12-12 06:00:37 PM  

Trillian Astra: PolloDiablo: I love Indian food, like really really love it, but it's one of the few cuisines I just don't cook at home. I've bought the packaged Butter Chicken and Tiki Masala spice mixes before, and they work ok, but there's just way too many unfamiliar spices and ingredients I would have to buy to properly do it from scratch.

You can find every spice you need at a grocery store.


Sure, but the prices are obscene in an "American" grocery store.  Getting it from an Inidan/Asian (H-Mart) store it's like 20%
 
2013-12-12 06:01:45 PM  
We used to make lots of naan at home, and no matter the recipe, it would never taste right.  We'd follow the recipe perfectly, put it in a hot oven with a pizza stone, and it would  lookperfect, but taste very different from the restaurant.  The outside would be crispy/hard, like a cracker crust.  Still tasty, but not what we wanted.

Then we cooked the same recipes in a cast-iron frying pan  on top ofthe stove, and why, the difference was magical.  Soft and chewy, just slightly blackened, almost exactly like from a tandoor (which I won't be buying anytime soon).  So that is my lesson for today: if you want good naan at home, use a cast-iron pan.
 
2013-12-12 06:04:58 PM  
I'm still trying to find a good Malai Kofta recipe. Every one I've tried, the koftas fall apart.
 
2013-12-12 06:09:38 PM  
#1 Indian food tip: Buy whole spices. Roast them up for a minute or two in a hot dry pan. Then grind them yourself.

There's no curry power in the world that you can buy that will be as good as freshly roasted and ground whole spices. The volatile compounds that give the spices much of their flavor do not survive long term storage. Even if you make your own curry powder, it will never be as tasty as the day it is ground.
 
2013-12-12 06:12:44 PM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: My wife loves chicken tikka (yeah, not really an Indian dish, but whatever) and I've never been able to replicate it to restaurant levels. It always ends up coming out wrong.

Generally, though, I just fry up some onions, garlic, and cumin and go from there. Potatoes, chick peas and tomatoes cooked until they're done.


The restaurant secret is heavy cream and Hunts diced tomatos if anybody hasn't told you yet
 
2013-12-12 06:16:37 PM  
I stick with doing the needful.
 
2013-12-12 06:17:53 PM  
Lal Maas. Amazing, awesome stuff.


Bright red and as hot as the sun. The flavour and colour come entirely from the chillies. It's so awesome. You can make it less hot by using mild kashmiri peppers instead of the hotter varieties, but it's never less than firey. Had it in India a few years ago and have since figured out how to make it pretty well, Yum.
 
2013-12-12 06:19:45 PM  
My major prof and his wife spent most of their lives in northern India and Nepal. When they moved to Florida, she would cook chickpeas with the "Spice Island" brand curry powder from the chain-store grocery.

For a while in Los Angeles we had an Indian restaurant that did a "Chinese" buffet on Friday nights. The dishes were a hybrid of what Americans think of as Indian and Chinese. Whenever a fresh batch of Manchurian Cauliflower came out of the kitchen, all the customers would pounce on it.
 
2013-12-12 06:20:44 PM  
 
2013-12-12 06:24:49 PM  
I used to live just off Devon Avenue in Chicago, I was in heaven.  Now I sit here with my sad little attempts at Indian food and weep.  We have made some really good samosas but miss on the chutney, and I have made some decent naan, but the kids don't like the spicy stuff and so its hit or miss on the curries.
 
2013-12-12 06:34:44 PM  
I found a recipe for saag paneer on the Webbernets and managed to do a pretty good job of it at home, although I decided to use ground cinnamon instead of toasting actual cinnamon sticks. Protip: the main herb associated with the flavor of saag paneer is fenugreek.
 
2013-12-12 06:35:29 PM  

interstellar_tedium: I used to live just off Devon Avenue in Chicago, I was in heaven.  Now I sit here with my sad little attempts at Indian food and weep.  We have made some really good samosas but miss on the chutney, and I have made some decent naan, but the kids don't like the spicy stuff and so its hit or miss on the curries.


I only visited there once but I still miss it. The food there was so incredibly good.
 
2013-12-12 06:38:44 PM  
I can't believe that an American fast food place hasn't exploited samosas.  Typically they're deep fried but we use puff pastry sheets and bake them: it doesn't sacrifice any taste.  They're great with salsa.

I'm looking for a recipe for Punjabi eggplant.


---

Samosas

Dough - use puff pastry sheets; defrost and roll flat.  Cut into squares for crust.

Spicy meat filling - enough for 2 batches
1 lb. ground beef
1 medium onion, chopped fine
1 tomato, chopped
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon red or green chillies - chopped
1 teaspoon coriander seeds, roasted and ground
1 teaspoon cumin seeds, roasted and ground
2 tablespoons garlic
2 tablespoons ginger, fresh grated
½ teaspoon curry powder (or to taste)
1 tablespoon oil
¼ cup peas
¼ cup chopped carrots (optional)
½ cup water

1. Cook the meat in a skillet with a little vegetable oil.
2. In a hot cast iron frying pan, put the cumin and coriander seeds.  Toss for about 30 seconds, then remove seeds and grind in a pestle.
3. Combine all ingredients and cook until water is completely absorbed.  Let stuffing cool.
4. Place meat into pastry, fold to form triangle.  Use egg wash (egg + 2 teaspoons water, whipped) to seal - and fork to press sides together.
5. Bake at package directions on dough until browned.
6. Serve with salsa, chipotle salsa.
 
2013-12-12 06:38:50 PM  
[notepad in hand, waits patiently for a good paneer recipe]
[and any other that looks tasty...]

/seriously, my attempts at paneer look like badly-made cottage cheese
 
2013-12-12 06:40:23 PM  
The magic ingredient most non-Indians cooking Indian food at home overlook: Ghee.

When you make Indian food at home do you ever think it is missing something compared to what you get at your favorite Indian place? Some extra depth of flavor, a certain savory nuttiness? It's because you are cooking with oil, and they are cooking with Ghee.

What is ghee? Basically, it's a type of clarified butter.

Where do I get some of this ghee? Well, you can find it in Asian markets or online. However if you've got butter, you can make it yourself.

Okay, so how do I make ghee? It can be amazingly simple. Get a saucepan. Drop a few sticks of unsalted butter into it and put it over the heat until it melts and simmers. Then just stand back. A fine foam will form on top of the simmering butter. Then this foam will die down. Then a second more coarse and bubbly foam will appear. It too will start to subside after a little more time, indicating you're about done. After about 20 minutes of simmering you should see all the milk solids in the butter have collect on the bottom of the pan. They should be getting a nice golden brown to brick red color around the same time the foam starts to subside. It is those milk solids browning that gives the ghee its special nutty aroma. With the solids browned and the foam almost finished, take it off the heat. Let it cool a little (so as not to shatter the container it will be going into) and then run through a sieve (or cheesecloth) as you pour it into a container so that you get just the liquid and not the solids. (Note: this is for a basic butter ghee which isn't really truly ghee according to my Indian friends, but it's close enough for me. There's a more authentic and advanced technique that starts from cream, takes all day, and requires a hot climate.)

Once it's in the jar and has cooled more, stick your nose in the jar and take a big whiff of the aroma. It should smell like butter candy (note, it does not taste like butter candy).

It should solidify as it cools. You can keep it in the fridge, but since it has most of its water boiled out of it ghee will remain fresh for a really long time even at room temperature. Another advantage is that the smoke point of ghee is very high, so it's great to use when woking things under very high heat.

Cook up your onions and garlic in the ghee instead of butter or oil. You will taste the difference in your curry.
 
2013-12-12 06:40:48 PM  

whither_apophis: lewismarktwo: OgreMagi: My Thanksgiving dinner was Chicken Tikka Masala.  Yes, I know that isn't a real traditional Indian dish, but it's my favorite.

I always tell them, "spicey, not gringo style".

Because the kitchen employs strictly spanish speakers?

I was at a small Chinese place in Reno and as the waitress was getting off work, she yells back to the kitchen "¡adios amigos!"

/csb


OgreMagi: lewismarktwo: OgreMagi: My Thanksgiving dinner was Chicken Tikka Masala.  Yes, I know that isn't a real traditional Indian dish, but it's my favorite.

I always tell them, "spicey, not gringo style".

Because the kitchen employs strictly spanish speakers?

I'm in California. Everyone knows at least that much Spanish.


Yeah, that's what I was getting at.  Chinese and Indian restaurants always seem to have quite a few 'spanish speakers'.
 
2013-12-12 06:41:23 PM  
*in the kitchen.
 
2013-12-12 06:43:44 PM  
Give me your butter chicken recipes, Farkers!!
 
2013-12-12 06:46:50 PM  

Dutch Pilsner: When buying vindaloo paste remember to cut it with tomato paste and/or tomatoes.

Made that mistake once.


Pussy.
 
2013-12-12 06:51:08 PM  

maniacbastard: So this idiot redneck I work with goes to an Indian Buffet with me. He looks at the stuff above and wrinkles up his nose and asks "what the effin hell is that???" So I tell him, Saag Paneer and he says"man, that's just gross", so I tell him it is really cheesy spinach and I was just messing with him. He responds, "No kidding???" and fills up half of his plate. The other half got covered with Tandoori Chicken (aka Indian BBQ Chicken, for the stupid redneck).


I work with two brothers whose parents are very conservative folks who moved to Florida to live in a gated community. When they come visit, they like to serve them "chicken and noodles" and "BBQ beef tips" from takeout instead of pad thai and sesame beef.
 
2013-12-12 06:52:38 PM  

Chabash: Give me your butter chicken recipes, Farkers!!


Here you go.  It's surprisingly easy.
 
2013-12-12 07:25:59 PM  

Creoena: I stick with doing the needful.


I am told to do the needful every day. I have started asking others to do the needful.

Even though I work with our Indian branch (which is, ya know, on the other side of the world) we only have 1 Indian restaurant in our town and I have eaten there... once. It is a pretty sad situation. I hear endless good things about Indian food.. and... I have 0 places to get it.
 
2013-12-12 07:38:10 PM  

spidermilk: Creoena: I stick with doing the needful.

I am told to do the needful every day. I have started asking others to do the needful.

Even though I work with our Indian branch (which is, ya know, on the other side of the world) we only have 1 Indian restaurant in our town and I have eaten there... once. It is a pretty sad situation. I hear endless good things about Indian food.. and... I have 0 places to get it.


Yeah, I have had zero happy Indian food experiences.  Ever.  I don't live in the UK, so my phonebook has many other options for take out.  I have never thought, "I really need some bhaji, vindaloo or a masala, within 15 minutes!"  I'd rather not have any of them for as long as I live.  If you crave this, good luck.  I can enjoy the flavor profiles, but I cannot help but wonder about the sanitation.  To be fair to my earlier post about Indian saniation standards:   I still expect worse standards from Mexican or Thai, but at least they understand basic flavor profiles.
 
2013-12-12 07:40:15 PM  
The place near me does some fantastic lamb dishes, especially the vindaloo. The sheer depth of flavor and spice is just amazing. And now I want some, and I already ate dinner. Plus some naan.
 
2013-12-12 07:41:29 PM  

MylesHeartVodak: I still expect worse standards from Mexican or Thai, but at least they understand basic flavor profiles.


That's not racist.
 
2013-12-12 08:41:20 PM  
How to tell if the Indian restaurant you are in is run by Pakistanis:  order the Curried Beef.

Lamb's good, too. I love lamb.

I like vegetarian Indian food but I can't remember what it's called, even after years of eating it whenever I can get it.

Baba Yaga? Nope.
Paneer Parthanon? Nope.
Papageno! Papageno! Nope.

I solve this lapsus by reading the menu, or failing that, by having everything. It's the pig's way out of a poke.
 
2013-12-12 08:41:51 PM  

khyberkitsune: Curry, Curry, and MORE Curry. A good mix of bloomed and raw curry at the right times makes EVERY BIT of difference in the world.

/bloom first, add some raw later when the stock/milk is added, add more bloomed right before dropping in bay leaf.
//don't forget the sesame oil
///would cook tonight but made himself sick losing $8,000


Sorry to hear that.
Losing $$ always makes me lose appetite as well.

/looking forward to your next cooking class
 
2013-12-12 08:46:07 PM  
Insert "not bads" and insults here.

i.imgur.com
 
2013-12-12 09:09:05 PM  
Indian food - loving it. Whatever the slop is in it. It's delicious.
 
2013-12-12 09:19:34 PM  

maniacbastard: [blogs.westword.com image 640x480]

So this idiot redneck I work with goes to an Indian Buffet with me. He looks at the stuff above and wrinkles up his nose and asks "what the effin hell is that???" So I tell him, Saag Paneer and he says"man, that's just gross", so I tell him it is really cheesy spinach and I was just messing with him. He responds, "No kidding???" and fills up half of his plate. The other half got covered with Tandoori Chicken (aka Indian BBQ Chicken, for the stupid redneck).

[upload.wikimedia.org image 480x640]

He had a good time, but I have to make up appetizing names for stuff so the moron will try it.


Doing your part to make the world a better place to live....DOTS OFF TO YOU!!!
 
2013-12-12 09:49:52 PM  

MylesHeartVodak: I still expect worse standards from Mexican or Thai, but at least they understand basic flavor profiles.


Indian food has some very complex flavour profiles. Most of the crappy takeout places use 4-6 mother sauces which are pretty similar except for colour and they they throw the meat in simmer for a couple of minutes and serve it. If a place has the same 5 dishes under Beef, Chicken, Fish and Lamb, you'll know that's what they're doing. Good Indian food will have the meat cooked with the spices before the sauce even develops.

And for really subtle Indian flavours try South Indian. Mostly veg or fish there are a whole world of different tastes.
 
2013-12-12 10:04:37 PM  
I eat vegetarian Indian food every night. Chapatis, rice, subgi and daal. My in laws are Gujarati, so they go through an INSANE amount of sugar. My favorites are pav bhagi (mashed mixed vegetables eaten on buttered rolls), undhiyu (whole vegetables and fried mustard-leaf balls), uttappam (vegetable pancake) and dosas. When we were in Jaipur, we ate jalebi in warm milk for breakfast (they look like mini funnelcakes in sugar syrup).

For anyone wanting to learn Indian/Indian inspired recipes, showmethecurry.com is a great source.
 
2013-12-12 10:05:13 PM  
This post is not a bookmark. Nope.

Loves me some Indian food. Anyone ever have Chicken 65? I've run into it in a couple of places in Dallas (which has quite a few Indian restaurants). It is DELICIOUS. It's sauteed chicken in a very spicy sauce. No clue what's in it, but it's so tasty. Also no idea why it's called "Chicken 65."
 
2013-12-12 10:12:27 PM  

Needlessly Complicated: This post is not a bookmark. Nope.

Loves me some Indian food. Anyone ever have Chicken 65? I've run into it in a couple of places in Dallas (which has quite a few Indian restaurants). It is DELICIOUS. It's sauteed chicken in a very spicy sauce. No clue what's in it, but it's so tasty. Also no idea why it's called "Chicken 65."


There are a few potential explanations for chicken 65: some people say you can get 65 pieces from the chicken, some say there are 65 spices in it. No one knows which is correct. I do know it's Indo-Chinese (did you know there are a ton of Chinese restaurants that cater to Indians??). We have a place in Atlanta where we always stop for chicken 65 and kulfi.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-12-12 10:16:54 PM  

Nately's Whore: I eat vegetarian Indian food every night. Chapatis, rice, subgi and daal. My in laws are Gujarati, so they go through an INSANE amount of sugar. My favorites are pav bhagi (mashed mixed vegetables eaten on buttered rolls), undhiyu (whole vegetables and fried mustard-leaf balls), uttappam (vegetable pancake) and dosas. When we were in Jaipur, we ate jalebi in warm milk for breakfast (they look like mini funnelcakes in sugar syrup).

For anyone wanting to learn Indian/Indian inspired recipes, showmethecurry.com is a great source.


Thanks!
 
2013-12-12 11:08:48 PM  
East Indian food is the ONLY food I do not like! It's not the heat because I love hot/spicy food. I think it's the combo of spices?
 
2013-12-13 12:00:40 AM  
I did an indian buffet for a few years, and I still cook indian food at least three times a week. My stepbrother got hooked on curry in the service so i cook one for him every family holiday. I'll share a few recipes.

Homemade paneer: put a gallon of whole milk in a double boiler over high heat until the milk is steaming. Add one pint of buttermilk and the juice of one lime. Let it continue steeping until the curds are fully separated from the whey. Strain through a double layer of cheesecloth in a china cap. Let drip for at least twenty minutes. Retain a small amount of whey. Let cool. Spread out on a sheet pan in the cooler. Put it in the robot-coupe or food processor and let it spin for a bit, adding in JUST enough whey to make the consistency smooth if it's not already. I like to add some flavoring at this point. Roasted red bell peppers or roasted garlic or even cilantro (if you're into that kinda thing) into the coupe. Then, scoop the moist paneer out into some cheese cloth and wrap it up. Wrap that up in a few layers of towels and put it in a pan with another pan on top with something in it. Let that sit in the fridge for a few days.

I like to cut it into cubes, dredge the cubes in rye flour and deep fry them, then put them in a saag or in with chicken tikka.

Speaking of saag:

Roast some garlic in clarified butter. Cool it and put it in a blender with some raw garlic. Blend it up... wheeee! Dice some onions, the whites of green onions, celery, green bell peppers, poblanos, jalapenos, pretty much any green peppers you've got. Grate some ginger (peel it first, fer fark's sake). Sautee all of that up in the garlic ghee with some garam masala, tumeric, mustard seeds and salt. Cool it down, add some (unsweetened) yogurt, sour cream and fine-cut spinach (or just some of that frozen spinach). Bring it up to temp and drop in your paneer. Top it off with some cilantro and green onions, and maybe some kind of chaunk like fried chickpeas or fried onions or fried anything because fried foods are awesome.
 
2013-12-13 12:04:30 AM  
Navajo taco fry bread is the only Indian food I'll eat

land.allears.net
 
2013-12-13 12:52:54 AM  
I'm staying in a house full of people from India, and I'm the only non-Indian; it has been fun.  7 of us guys sleep on the floor on mats next to each other.  Last night they cooked a delicious Palak Paneer (spinach sauce with cheese), made rice and fried some papadom.  We all sat in a circle on the floor eating, with the pots sitting in the middle.  3 or 4 different languages were in use.  One of the guys ran off to bring me a spoon, but I told him to come back, that I would eat with my fingers like everyone else.  It's the first time I have eaten with my hands some rice soaked with sauce.  It was messy and a new experience, I liked it.
 
2013-12-13 01:40:05 AM  

TreeHugger: I'm staying in a house full of people from India, and I'm the only non-Indian; it has been fun.  7 of us guys sleep on the floor on mats next to each other.  Last night they cooked a delicious Palak Paneer (spinach sauce with cheese), made rice and fried some papadom.  We all sat in a circle on the floor eating, with the pots sitting in the middle.  3 or 4 different languages were in use.  One of the guys ran off to bring me a spoon, but I told him to come back, that I would eat with my fingers like everyone else.  It's the first time I have eaten with my hands some rice soaked with sauce.  It was messy and a new experience, I liked it.


Naan, roti or poppadoms really help with that sort of situation.
 
2013-12-13 02:13:33 AM  
This is not a bookmark.
 
2013-12-13 02:16:45 AM  
If you like Indian food, you like gross things. That is factual.
 
2013-12-13 08:05:17 AM  
There is nothing Indian about Curry powder.
 
2013-12-13 08:41:23 AM  
"Yeah! Where's the bloody vindaloo, HIPPIE??"
 
2013-12-13 08:43:44 AM  
Veggie Indian.  Dahi Poori, Masala Dosa, and Paneer Pakora.

YUM.

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
Biv
2013-12-13 11:14:11 AM  
I have never eaten an Indian dish.  Ever.

Not opposed, just never been in a situation to do so.

Someone on my apartment floor makes the most wonderful smelling Indian food.
 
2013-12-13 11:28:09 AM  

cameroncrazy1984: MylesHeartVodak: I still expect worse standards from Mexican or Thai, but at least they understand basic flavor profiles.

That's not racist.


I didn't mean it that way.  It's simply been my experience looking at their certificate grades.  It's not unusual for a family owned ethnic spot to have a rating in the 60s or 70s and still be in business. 
A local place was shut down after having an open sewage pipe in the kitchen.  After 5 years of not making repairs.  It's a cultural issue about basic sanitation that is usually taken for granted in most modern nations, not a racial one.
 
2013-12-13 10:39:44 PM  

Needlessly Complicated: This post is not a bookmark. Nope.

Loves me some Indian food. Anyone ever have Chicken 65? I've run into it in a couple of places in Dallas (which has quite a few Indian restaurants). It is DELICIOUS. It's sauteed chicken in a very spicy sauce. No clue what's in it, but it's so tasty. Also no idea why it's called "Chicken 65."


Chicken 65 is Hakka cuisine, which is made by Chinese people living in India. Hakka tends to have deep fried meat in goopy, super-salty sauces - usually soy-sauce and cornstarch-based. I like it occasionally but it's really heavy and you need 3 gallons of water afterwards to dilute the sodium.
 
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