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(Huffington Post)   How do you explain color to an 11-year old?   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 18
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3776 clicks; posted to Geek » on 12 Dec 2013 at 9:20 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-12 11:20:19 AM  
3 votes:

PC LOAD LETTER: try explaining it to a blind person.


I think you could do that by analogy to pitch in music.

Both color and pitch are properties resulting from the frequency and wavelength of waves (light and sound, respectively) that are then interpreted by our senses as falling along a spectrum.
2013-12-12 11:45:45 AM  
2 votes:

Doc Daneeka: PC LOAD LETTER: try explaining it to a blind person.

I think you could do that by analogy to pitch in music.

Both color and pitch are properties resulting from the frequency and wavelength of waves (light and sound, respectively) that are then interpreted by our senses as falling along a spectrum.


Enter the contest.  Use that explanation.  Do it.
Every scientist Farker should take a stab at it.  There's a written category and a video category.

Some of you know that I won the video category last year (well, this summer).  It's a great experience, and the winners get to go to New York and meet Alan Freaking Alda (bonus: if you meet him again later, he remembers you, and then tells a roomful of your colleagues how great you are).

Fark needs to keep its streak going.  Enter.  You have until, like, March or something.
2013-12-12 10:28:42 AM  
2 votes:

homarjr: Step 1: Get high.
Step 2: Think about how the colours I see might be different than the colours you see, and there's no way of knowing. For example, we both know what the colour red looks like to ourselves, but if I looked through your eyes, I'd call that colour blue. You've just known it to be red forever.
Step 3: Eat doritos


My corollary to this theory is that everyone's "favorite color" is actually blue.
2013-12-12 09:01:24 AM  
2 votes:
Um, they're 11.  Shouldn't they have concepts like that sort of locked down by then?
2013-12-12 09:44:53 PM  
1 votes:

homarjr: My point is, there is no secondary trait to colours. You can only explain colours by pointing at things that are that colour, and we have to associate the two.

Most adjectives don't work that way. It's easy to explain what soft, hard, clean, tough, dry, wet, etc are, because we can compare two different objects and use more than just our sense of sight to determine what they are. Smell, touch and taste go a long way in communication. Since colour is only determined by sight, and we can't see through someone else's eyes, we don't know exactly what they're seeing. We just know what "red" is by our own association to objects that are red.

/Spent hours thinking about this while smoking the reef
//Was probably only 10 seconds, but it felt like more....


Color is not exclusively an adjective in the way you want to imply.  It is a subcategory of "light" ie the visible spectrum of electromagnetic energy.

Here's a fun fact.  Not a one of you has been burned by the sun's heat.

We can't see out of other people's eyes?  Not even close?

MRI's and other assorted scans come amazingly close and technology is improving.

Want another proof of concept?

Here:
spectrum.ieee.org
One step closer to proving god doesn't exist, err, I mean, proving that human brains mostly function in very similar ways, leaving less and less room for "farking magnets, how do they work?" Or something.

Disclaimer:  All the images you see from that experiment are visually similar.  They are skipping the eyes completely and pulling the images from brain waves, interpreted by a computer program, the resulting red blobs are a conglomeration of similar shaped pictures taken from youtube stills all overlaid by a computer program.

As with TV's, a jump to color and then High Def is not really all that unlikely.

/and if you have no idea what experiment I'm talking about, you have no grounds coming in here telling me how it is, uneducated morans trying to preach...pardon me, teach how the world works....
2013-12-12 05:22:41 PM  
1 votes:

omeganuepsilon: homarjr: Step 1: Get high.
Step 2: Think about how the colours I see might be different than the colours you see, and there's no way of knowing. For example, we both know what the colour red looks like to ourselves, but if I looked through your eyes, I'd call that colour blue. You've just known it to be red forever.
Step 3: Eat doritos

False.

through effective communication we can describe colors and gradients.  We can agree that in a given picture where an item is smoothly shaded.  If you saw blue instead of red, it would stand out in harsh contrast.(playing with some of the color sliders in photoshop simply illustrates this)

The only true aspect of that is that we see colors only slightly differently(a lot of it based on how our eyes are acclimated in that moment), or if under impairment(color blindness) a lot but it's still identifiable.  We know that color blindess exists, they do see different colors(and/or lack therof) than other people, and we nailed that through effective communication.

If you saw blue in place of red, it would be no different.


OK, without just describing objects that are red, describe to me the colour red.

Grass is "green" to all of us, but that particular colour might be very different to both of us. And it wouldn't be harsh, it's perfectly normal. We both know what green is, and have known our whole lives. The entire world might be different to you than me, but we don't know any better.

My point is, there is no secondary trait to colours. You can only explain colours by pointing at things that are that colour, and we have to associate the two.

Most adjectives don't work that way. It's easy to explain what soft, hard, clean, tough, dry, wet, etc are, because we can compare two different objects and use more than just our sense of sight to determine what they are. Smell, touch and taste go a long way in communication. Since colour is only determined by sight, and we can't see through someone else's eyes, we don't know exactly what they're seeing. We just know what "red" is by our own association to objects that are red.

/Spent hours thinking about this while smoking the reef
//Was probably only 10 seconds, but it felt like more....
2013-12-12 12:40:39 PM  
1 votes:

Fark_Guy_Rob: Why the heck do people spend so much time worrying about how to explain something to kids.  Just explain it.  Like you would to an adult.

How would you explain color to an adult?  That's a better question.  Better still is, 'How would you explain color?'  That sums it up.  Talking to adult doesn't meant they understand color and talking to a child doesn't mean they don't.


I agree with you, but what do we know?

"If you can't explain it to a six-year-old, you don't understand it yourself."
-Albert Einstein
2013-12-12 12:37:34 PM  
1 votes:
all the mentions of Bill Nye and no one shows any love for this guy?

www.zdnet.com
2013-12-12 12:33:28 PM  
1 votes:
Why the heck do people spend so much time worrying about how to explain something to kids.  Just explain it.  Like you would to an adult.

How would you explain color to an adult?  That's a better question.  Better still is, 'How would you explain color?'  That sums it up.  Talking to adult doesn't meant they understand color and talking to a child doesn't mean they don't.
2013-12-12 12:29:18 PM  
1 votes:

Peki: Really? I think fourth grade was when I learned about light waves and how color is just what bounces.

I love how people think kids are stupid because they are young. . .


This.  The average 11-year-old is smarter than the average adult.  When they were reviewing the finalists, some kids said they wanted to know about spacetime.

It annoys me when people talk down to kids, especially with that condescending fake-excited tone.  Kids can tell when they're being patronised.  I treat them like inconveniently small adults, and they seem to respond to that.  With teenagers, I just speak their native language: sarcasm.
2013-12-12 12:16:55 PM  
1 votes:

Delta1212: I was just about to ask for a summary of last year's video submission. I'd watch it myself, but I don't have enough of this intangible thing that I don't quite understand.


Here it is anyway
2013-12-12 11:24:06 AM  
1 votes:

PC LOAD LETTER: try explaining it to a blind person.


Brightness is like loudness, color is like pitch.  Your eyes allow you to see the "sound" that the world makes.
2013-12-12 10:15:56 AM  
1 votes:
Step 1: Get high.
Step 2: Think about how the colours I see might be different than the colours you see, and there's no way of knowing. For example, we both know what the colour red looks like to ourselves, but if I looked through your eyes, I'd call that colour blue. You've just known it to be red forever.
Step 3: Eat doritos
2013-12-12 09:49:40 AM  
1 votes:
A Kiss Concert and 3-2-1 Contact.
2013-12-12 09:49:02 AM  
1 votes:
Son dont stare.  They just have a genetic trait where they produce more melanin.
2013-12-12 09:34:31 AM  
1 votes:
With my penis.

Is this a trick question?
2013-12-12 09:32:33 AM  
1 votes:
i.cdn.turner.com
2013-12-12 08:24:43 AM  
1 votes:
Spell it with an extra u.

colour US, color [ˈkʌlə]
n1. (Physics / General Physics)
a.  an attribute of things that results from the light they reflect, transmit, or emit in so far as this light causes a visual sensation that depends on its wavelengths
b.  the aspect of visual perception by which an observer recognizes this attribute
c.  the quality of the light producing this aspect of visual perception
d.  (as modifier) colour vision
2. (Physics / General Physics) Also called chromatic colour
a.
  a colour, such as red or green, that possesses hue, as opposed to achromatic colours such as white or black
b.  (as modifier) a colour television a colour film Compare black-and-white [2]
3. (Clothing, Personal Arts & Crafts / Dyeing) a substance, such as a dye, pigment, or paint, that imparts colour to something
4. (Social Science / Anthropology & Ethnology)
a.  the skin complexion of a person, esp as determined by his race
b.  (as modifier) colour prejudice colour problem
5. (Fine Arts & Visual Arts / Art Terms) the use of all the hues in painting as distinct from composition, form, and light and shade
6. (Communication Arts / Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) the quantity and quality of ink used in a printing process
7. (Music, other) the distinctive tone of a musical sound; timbre
8. vividness, authenticity, or individuality period colour
9. semblance or pretext (esp in the phrases take on a different colour, under colour of)
10. (Mining & Quarrying) US a precious mineral particle, esp gold, found in auriferous gravel
11. (Physics / General Physics) Physics one of three characteristics of quarks, designated red, blue, or green, but having no relationship with the physical sensation
vb
1. to give or apply colour to (something)
2. (tr) to give a convincing or plausible appearance to (something, esp to that which is spoken or recounted) to colour an alibi
3. (tr) to influence or distort (something, esp a report or opinion) anger coloured her judgment
4. (intr; often foll by up) to become red in the face, esp when embarrassed or annoyed
5. (Life Sciences & Allied Applications / Agriculture) (intr) (esp of ripening fruit) to change hue See also colours
[from Old French colour from Latin color tint, hue]
 
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