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(Huffington Post)   How do you explain color to an 11-year old?   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 105
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3772 clicks; posted to Geek » on 12 Dec 2013 at 9:20 AM (41 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-12 08:24:43 AM
Spell it with an extra u.

colour US, color [ˈkʌlə]
n1. (Physics / General Physics)
a.  an attribute of things that results from the light they reflect, transmit, or emit in so far as this light causes a visual sensation that depends on its wavelengths
b.  the aspect of visual perception by which an observer recognizes this attribute
c.  the quality of the light producing this aspect of visual perception
d.  (as modifier) colour vision
2. (Physics / General Physics) Also called chromatic colour
a.
  a colour, such as red or green, that possesses hue, as opposed to achromatic colours such as white or black
b.  (as modifier) a colour television a colour film Compare black-and-white [2]
3. (Clothing, Personal Arts & Crafts / Dyeing) a substance, such as a dye, pigment, or paint, that imparts colour to something
4. (Social Science / Anthropology & Ethnology)
a.  the skin complexion of a person, esp as determined by his race
b.  (as modifier) colour prejudice colour problem
5. (Fine Arts & Visual Arts / Art Terms) the use of all the hues in painting as distinct from composition, form, and light and shade
6. (Communication Arts / Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) the quantity and quality of ink used in a printing process
7. (Music, other) the distinctive tone of a musical sound; timbre
8. vividness, authenticity, or individuality period colour
9. semblance or pretext (esp in the phrases take on a different colour, under colour of)
10. (Mining & Quarrying) US a precious mineral particle, esp gold, found in auriferous gravel
11. (Physics / General Physics) Physics one of three characteristics of quarks, designated red, blue, or green, but having no relationship with the physical sensation
vb
1. to give or apply colour to (something)
2. (tr) to give a convincing or plausible appearance to (something, esp to that which is spoken or recounted) to colour an alibi
3. (tr) to influence or distort (something, esp a report or opinion) anger coloured her judgment
4. (intr; often foll by up) to become red in the face, esp when embarrassed or annoyed
5. (Life Sciences & Allied Applications / Agriculture) (intr) (esp of ripening fruit) to change hue See also colours
[from Old French colour from Latin color tint, hue]
 
2013-12-12 08:39:22 AM
It's the opposite of Alan Alda
 
2013-12-12 09:01:14 AM
Just play 'em the Ice-T song
 
2013-12-12 09:01:24 AM
Um, they're 11.  Shouldn't they have concepts like that sort of locked down by then?
 
2013-12-12 09:26:48 AM
www.reoiv.com
 
2013-12-12 09:31:02 AM

Dust: Um, they're 11.  Shouldn't they have concepts like that sort of locked down by then?


At 11, you can recognize and decipher color (provided you don't have a genetic defect), but you don't know what color is.  You don't know why color matters, what causes its variation, or why you can see it.

Basically, you have the basic biology to recognize color because it's helpful to survival, but you don't understand it at all.  And if the goal is to encourage more kids to pursue science and technology as they grow up, you have to be able to answer questions like "what is color" to an 11 year old in a way they can understand and pursue in study.
 
2013-12-12 09:31:41 AM
Hand them a box of crayons.
 
2013-12-12 09:32:33 AM
i.cdn.turner.com
 
2013-12-12 09:34:31 AM
With my penis.

Is this a trick question?
 
2013-12-12 09:36:12 AM
How I would teach it.

Prismatic Spray
1d8     Color
of Beam     Effect
1     Red     20 points fire damage (Reflex half)
2     Orange     40 points acid damage (Reflex half)
3     Yellow     80 points electricity damage (Reflex half)
4     Green     Poison (Kills; Fortitude partial, take 1d6 points of Con damage instead)
5     Blue     Turned to stone (Fortitude negates)
6     Indigo     Insane, as insanity spell (Will negates)
7     Violet     Sent to another plane (Will negates)
8     Struck by two rays; roll twice more, ignoring any "8" results.
Evocation
Level:     Sor/Wiz 7
Components:     V, S
Casting Time:     1 standard action
Range:     60 ft.
Area:     Cone-shaped burst
Duration:     Instantaneous
Saving Throw:     See text
Spell Resistance:     Yes
This spell causes seven shimmering, intertwined, multicolored beams of light to spray from your hand. Each beam has a different power. Creatures in the area of the spell with 8 HD or less are automatically blinded for 2d4 rounds. Every creature in the area is randomly struck by one or more beams, which have additional effects.
 
2013-12-12 09:37:02 AM
When I was a kid my uncles used to ask "where does the flame go when it goes out?". Never heard of this before, but that's what it reminded me of.

/FWIW I eventually answered "hell", i was raised catholic ;b
 
2013-12-12 09:49:02 AM
Son dont stare.  They just have a genetic trait where they produce more melanin.
 
2013-12-12 09:49:40 AM
A Kiss Concert and 3-2-1 Contact.
 
2013-12-12 09:53:58 AM
The visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum suffers from multiple personality disorder and can't decide what to be unless it reflects off something, just like your Uncle Teddy.
 
2013-12-12 10:08:39 AM
LSD
Lava lamp

They'll discover colors alright
 
2013-12-12 10:15:12 AM
try explaining it to a blind person.
 
2013-12-12 10:15:56 AM
Step 1: Get high.
Step 2: Think about how the colours I see might be different than the colours you see, and there's no way of knowing. For example, we both know what the colour red looks like to ourselves, but if I looked through your eyes, I'd call that colour blue. You've just known it to be red forever.
Step 3: Eat doritos
 
2013-12-12 10:28:42 AM

homarjr: Step 1: Get high.
Step 2: Think about how the colours I see might be different than the colours you see, and there's no way of knowing. For example, we both know what the colour red looks like to ourselves, but if I looked through your eyes, I'd call that colour blue. You've just known it to be red forever.
Step 3: Eat doritos


My corollary to this theory is that everyone's "favorite color" is actually blue.
 
2013-12-12 10:33:40 AM

Sybarite: Just play 'em the Ice-T song


More 11 year olds should be listening to rap from that era.

/half serious
 
2013-12-12 10:34:26 AM

Khellendros: At 11, you can recognize and decipher color (provided you don't have a genetic defect), but you don't know what color is.  You don't know why color matters, what causes its variation, or why you can see it.


When I was 11 I understood that color was caused by variations in wavelength in visible light, and I understood that the cones in our eyes let us see and distinguish color.  I understood that visible light contained all of the possible colors, and that you can prove this with a prism.

Granted, I watched a lot of Bill Nye when I was a kid, which is pretty much where I learned all of that stuff.
 
2013-12-12 10:35:02 AM
I start them off with a Spinal Tap album cover, asking them how much more black it could be.
 
2013-12-12 10:40:41 AM
You explain color to a child by giving them crayons and having them color things, and coloring things with them.  They will pick up on it.
 
2013-12-12 10:41:55 AM
Take something red.  Say this is red.  Take something blue.  Say this is blue.

Repeat for other colors
 
2013-12-12 11:20:19 AM

PC LOAD LETTER: try explaining it to a blind person.


I think you could do that by analogy to pitch in music.

Both color and pitch are properties resulting from the frequency and wavelength of waves (light and sound, respectively) that are then interpreted by our senses as falling along a spectrum.
 
2013-12-12 11:24:06 AM

PC LOAD LETTER: try explaining it to a blind person.


Brightness is like loudness, color is like pitch.  Your eyes allow you to see the "sound" that the world makes.
 
2013-12-12 11:24:49 AM
Shakes tiny fist at Doc Daneeka.
 
2013-12-12 11:33:02 AM

HMS_Blinkin: Khellendros: At 11, you can recognize and decipher color (provided you don't have a genetic defect), but you don't know what color is.  You don't know why color matters, what causes its variation, or why you can see it.

When I was 11 I understood that color was caused by variations in wavelength in visible light, and I understood that the cones in our eyes let us see and distinguish color.  I understood that visible light contained all of the possible colors, and that you can prove this with a prism.

Granted, I watched a lot of Bill Nye when I was a kid, which is pretty much where I learned all of that stuff.


images2.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-12-12 11:41:23 AM

Saiga410: Son dont stare.  They just have a genetic trait where they produce more melanin.


Lol

/or "less melanin"
 
2013-12-12 11:45:45 AM

Doc Daneeka: PC LOAD LETTER: try explaining it to a blind person.

I think you could do that by analogy to pitch in music.

Both color and pitch are properties resulting from the frequency and wavelength of waves (light and sound, respectively) that are then interpreted by our senses as falling along a spectrum.


Enter the contest.  Use that explanation.  Do it.
Every scientist Farker should take a stab at it.  There's a written category and a video category.

Some of you know that I won the video category last year (well, this summer).  It's a great experience, and the winners get to go to New York and meet Alan Freaking Alda (bonus: if you meet him again later, he remembers you, and then tells a roomful of your colleagues how great you are).

Fark needs to keep its streak going.  Enter.  You have until, like, March or something.
 
2013-12-12 11:52:37 AM
I was just about to ask for a summary of last year's video submission. I'd watch it myself, but I don't have enough of this intangible thing that I don't quite understand.
 
2013-12-12 12:05:03 PM
Really? I think fourth grade was when I learned about light waves and how color is just what bounces.

I love how people think kids are stupid because they are young. . .
 
2013-12-12 12:06:23 PM
SCIENCE!!!
 
2013-12-12 12:07:21 PM

BafflerMeal: HMS_Blinkin: Khellendros: At 11, you can recognize and decipher color (provided you don't have a genetic defect), but you don't know what color is.  You don't know why color matters, what causes its variation, or why you can see it.

When I was 11 I understood that color was caused by variations in wavelength in visible light, and I understood that the cones in our eyes let us see and distinguish color.  I understood that visible light contained all of the possible colors, and that you can prove this with a prism.

Granted, I watched a lot of Bill Nye when I was a kid, which is pretty much where I learned all of that stuff.

[images2.wikia.nocookie.net image 850x680]


I found Bill Nye was in the 1990s was only maybe half as good at actually explaining things than the shows that TV Ontario ran in the 1980s. Nye described things, but The Edison Twins, Eureka, OWL TV (especially) and others actually talked about the experiments and the math behind them in ways that, yes, even grade 1s could visualize and understand. As a teenager I kept thinking, "Okay, this is fun, but I don't see much science. When is he going to get to the science?" Eureka was so much simpler in presentation and yet somehow taught science more effectively. Of course, Eureka and OWL TV might have been aimed at a younger audience who appreciated some quiet leveled voices rather than loud screaming and colours.
 
2013-12-12 12:16:55 PM

Delta1212: I was just about to ask for a summary of last year's video submission. I'd watch it myself, but I don't have enough of this intangible thing that I don't quite understand.


Here it is anyway
 
2013-12-12 12:18:18 PM
carersblog.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-12-12 12:23:54 PM

a2revolver: [www.reoiv.com image 800x1021]


Came to post that, glad you had a color version.
 
2013-12-12 12:23:55 PM
Space Station Wagon: 8 Struck by two rays; roll twice more, ignoring any "8" results.

I always wondered what the angular distribution of the beams were that they only bothered to put 'struck by two rays' into the mechanics.

I mean, what if someone gets blasted by a point blank casting? Like casters hand is a half inch from your chest?

// assuming that all eight rays hit, ouch.
 
2013-12-12 12:29:18 PM

Peki: Really? I think fourth grade was when I learned about light waves and how color is just what bounces.

I love how people think kids are stupid because they are young. . .


This.  The average 11-year-old is smarter than the average adult.  When they were reviewing the finalists, some kids said they wanted to know about spacetime.

It annoys me when people talk down to kids, especially with that condescending fake-excited tone.  Kids can tell when they're being patronised.  I treat them like inconveniently small adults, and they seem to respond to that.  With teenagers, I just speak their native language: sarcasm.
 
2013-12-12 12:30:23 PM
The same way you explain anything to an 11 year old...
 
2013-12-12 12:33:01 PM

lordargent: Space Station Wagon: 8 Struck by two rays; roll twice more, ignoring any "8" results.

I always wondered what the angular distribution of the beams were that they only bothered to put 'struck by two rays' into the mechanics.

I mean, what if someone gets blasted by a point blank casting? Like casters hand is a half inch from your chest?

// assuming that all eight rays hit, ouch.


Physics doesn't matter, that's what the rules say. /rules lawyer

I learned to stop thinking too hard about stuff like that when I realised giant spiders should collapse under their own weight and then suffocate.

Although I have heard tales of people using physics to work out if a falling mage had enough time to cast a spell before he hit the group (answer: yes).
 
2013-12-12 12:33:28 PM
Why the heck do people spend so much time worrying about how to explain something to kids.  Just explain it.  Like you would to an adult.

How would you explain color to an adult?  That's a better question.  Better still is, 'How would you explain color?'  That sums it up.  Talking to adult doesn't meant they understand color and talking to a child doesn't mean they don't.
 
2013-12-12 12:34:05 PM
Color is simply the incorrect spelling of colour. Next question please.
 
2013-12-12 12:35:11 PM

drumhellar: a2revolver: [www.reoiv.com image 800x1021]

Came to post that, glad you had a color version.


It's B&W for those under age 11
 
2013-12-12 12:35:15 PM
What's the difference between pink and purple?
The grip.
 
2013-12-12 12:37:34 PM
all the mentions of Bill Nye and no one shows any love for this guy?

www.zdnet.com
 
2013-12-12 12:40:39 PM

Russ1642: Color is simply the incorrect spelling of colour. Next question qestion please.


FTFY
 
2013-12-12 12:40:39 PM

Fark_Guy_Rob: Why the heck do people spend so much time worrying about how to explain something to kids.  Just explain it.  Like you would to an adult.

How would you explain color to an adult?  That's a better question.  Better still is, 'How would you explain color?'  That sums it up.  Talking to adult doesn't meant they understand color and talking to a child doesn't mean they don't.


I agree with you, but what do we know?

"If you can't explain it to a six-year-old, you don't understand it yourself."
-Albert Einstein
 
2013-12-12 12:50:08 PM
The sky is actually violet; that is, the light that hits your eyes when you look at the sky is actually about 60% violet wavelengths and 40% blue wavelengths. However, your eyes are much more sensitive to blue than they are to violet, so the blue drowns the violet out and the sky appears to be blue.
 
2013-12-12 12:55:49 PM

Bondith: lordargent: Space Station Wagon: 8 Struck by two rays; roll twice more, ignoring any "8" results.

I always wondered what the angular distribution of the beams were that they only bothered to put 'struck by two rays' into the mechanics.

I mean, what if someone gets blasted by a point blank casting? Like casters hand is a half inch from your chest?

// assuming that all eight rays hit, ouch.

Physics doesn't matter, that's what the rules say. /rules lawyer

I learned to stop thinking too hard about stuff like that when I realised giant spiders should collapse under their own weight and then suffocate.

Although I have heard tales of people using physics to work out if a falling mage had enough time to cast a spell before he hit the group (answer: yes).


Right, like how do undead skeletons move and fight?
Because magic!

hmmmm, instant cast Prismatic Spray = Prismatic Burst (or maybe blast).
I like it!
 
2013-12-12 12:56:36 PM
hmmmm, instant cast point blank Prismatic Spray = Prismatic Burst (or maybe blast).
I like it!
 
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