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(Some Guy)   The dozen best hard-boiled private eyes that ever kicked a goon in the nuts with a wisecrack   (crimefictionlover.com) divider line 61
    More: Interesting, crime novels, Charlie Parker, Hercule Poirot, murder mystery, Dashiell Hammett  
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2741 clicks; posted to Geek » on 11 Dec 2013 at 11:41 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



61 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-12-11 11:26:37 PM  
I thought this was going to be a display of deviled eggs.
 
2013-12-11 11:26:55 PM  
List fails without Long Dark Tea Time of the Soul
 
2013-12-11 11:31:39 PM  
List fails™ without Dixon Hill and Guy Noir.
 
2013-12-12 12:01:30 AM  
Are we only counting books because...

i.imgur.com

i.imgur.com
 
2013-12-12 12:05:22 AM  
i1.cdnds.net
 
2013-12-12 12:07:28 AM  
List utterly, completely fails without Burke.

Seriously...UTTER EPIC FAIL.
 
2013-12-12 12:10:39 AM  
I never really thought of Sherlock Holmes as "hard-boiled". Is this an English food reference or something?
 
2013-12-12 12:12:47 AM  

dramboxf: List utterly, completely fails without Burke.

Seriously...UTTER EPIC FAIL.


Burke is not a private detective.
 
2013-12-12 12:15:29 AM  

fusillade762: I never really thought of Sherlock Holmes as "hard-boiled". Is this an English food reference or something?


If Holmes is considered 'hard boiled', where's Archie Goodwin on the scale?
 
2013-12-12 12:15:36 AM  

Snapper Carr: Are we only counting books because...

[i.imgur.com image 533x530]

[i.imgur.com image 658x370]


Oh, and just one more thing...

i.imgur.com
 
2013-12-12 12:19:31 AM  
bookpeopleblog.files.wordpress.com

I will just leave this here....
 
2013-12-12 12:21:29 AM  

Dr.Zom: Burke is not a private detective.


He's not licensed, sure -- but he performs all the tasks of classic literary PI/PDs.
 
2013-12-12 12:23:33 AM  
Well, I guess I have some reading to do, as I haven't read a few of those.

Maybe he doesn't deserve to be on the list, but while we're talking private detectives, I must say I've really enjoyed the Elvis Cole stories by Robert Crais. :)
 
2013-12-12 01:23:38 AM  
If there's room for another 'list fails without', I'd like to nominate Glen Cook's "Garrett, PI".

Kudos to the inclusion of Archie Goodwin, and may I also put in a good word for Terry Pratchett's 'Sam Vimes' and Randall Garrett's "Lord D'Arcy"?

From TV, there's Sam Tyler and The Guv from 'Life on Mars' (the original Brit version, not that arsing-around Yank remake).

From movies, who can forget Lou Peckinpah, from 'The Cheap Detective'?

Good times, man, good times...
 
2013-12-12 01:36:12 AM  
No Harry Bosch?

Bah.
 
2013-12-12 01:37:43 AM  
Oh wait, he's a police detective, not a P.I.

Um... bah?
 
2013-12-12 01:43:22 AM  
List fails without NICK DANGER....3rd eye....
 
2013-12-12 01:44:34 AM  
The only 2 worth mentioning;

Dick Gently and
Lazlo Woodbine

Neither on the list... I detect elitism...
 
2013-12-12 01:49:14 AM  
Not really a bad list per se, although Charlie Parker seems out place. I'm no fan of Sara Paretsky either so I'd switch those two with Nameless and Sharon McCone.
 
2013-12-12 01:59:51 AM  
List needed Father Brown. Being English, he probably prefers soft-boiled eggs however.
 
2013-12-12 02:18:32 AM  
Rigby Reardon
 
2013-12-12 02:29:19 AM  
P.S. - and, also kudos for throwing Lt. Columbo and Jim Rockford in, here.

And I should have also mentioned 'Harry Dresden'.
 
2013-12-12 02:40:31 AM  
Glad to see Marlowe in the top spot.  Hands down the best-written "noir" detective around.  Iconic- so much so that when you read The Big Sleep for the first time you almost think Chandler's copying the "hard-boiled private eye" genre when in fact he's defining it.
 
2013-12-12 02:42:30 AM  
Oh, and Jeff Randall, of "Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased)", a/k/a "My Partner The Ghost".
 
2013-12-12 02:45:22 AM  

suziequzie: fusillade762: I never really thought of Sherlock Holmes as "hard-boiled". Is this an English food reference or something?

If Holmes is considered 'hard boiled', where's Archie Goodwin on the scale?


Somebody called?
 
2013-12-12 02:52:28 AM  
Geez, every time I try and get to sleep, I come up with another one to add - Charles Escott and Jack Fleming, from P. N. Elrod's 'The Vampire Files'.
 
2013-12-12 02:58:25 AM  
www.startrek.com
 
2013-12-12 02:58:41 AM  
static1.wikia.nocookie.net

/That doesn't rhyme with "walls."
 
2013-12-12 03:11:14 AM  

Ellis D Trails: List fails without NICK DANGER....3rd eye....


What's in the paper bag?!?
 
2013-12-12 03:14:30 AM  

dramboxf: Dr.Zom: Burke is not a private detective.

He's not licensed, sure -- but he performs all the tasks of classic literary PI/PDs.


Matt Scudder probably deserves it more than Burke, but he's off the books too. He does take clients though.
 
2013-12-12 03:36:23 AM  
Did Frank Sinatra play any of those?

I like Frank Sinatra.
 
2013-12-12 05:33:17 AM  

tillerman35: Glad to see Marlowe in the top spot.  Hands down the best-written "noir" detective around.  Iconic- so much so that when you read The Big Sleep for the first time you almost think Chandler's copying the "hard-boiled private eye" genre when in fact he's defining it.


The Long Goodbye is my favorite and the Robert Altman movie is masterful

/your cat wants food
 
2013-12-12 05:38:10 AM  
It's strange, isn't it, how you plot and plan a submission with intentions of guffaws, snarkiness, bie/eip, and general chaos only to see it shot down like some third-rate hood in a bungled purse snatching on South 6th Street?

but then you submit a 30 second second thought more out of boredom than anything else and it goes green

yes, this life is strange.
 
2013-12-12 05:59:22 AM  
It's a quality list.  Are there some good one missing? Absolutely.  But I can't see any on there I would actually replace.
 
2013-12-12 06:05:20 AM  
Some worthy alternates:

Travis McGee
Raylan Givens
 
2013-12-12 06:11:49 AM  

Dwight_Yeast: Ellis D Trails: List fails without NICK DANGER....3rd eye....

What's in the paper bag?!?


That's nothing but a two-bit ring from a Cracker Back jocks.

/He walks again by night
/Out of the fog, into the smog
 
2013-12-12 06:13:48 AM  

Omahawg: It's strange, isn't it, how you plot and plan a submission with intentions of guffaws, snarkiness, bie/eip, and general chaos only to see it shot down like some third-rate hood in a bungled purse snatching on South 6th Street?

but then you submit a 30 second second thought more out of boredom than anything else and it goes green

yes, this life is strange.


"Strange? I'd wiped stranger things off the shot glasses from Mike's down the street. No, this day, already stranger than some guy in a white van offering candy to kids, took a twist sharper than my ex's knees when some dame walked into my office..."
 
2013-12-12 06:15:12 AM  
Also: no love for Tracer Bullitt?
 
2013-12-12 07:55:51 AM  
I've always preferred Agatha Christie, just not that particular story.
 
2013-12-12 08:31:33 AM  
+1 Amos Walker
 
2013-12-12 08:32:11 AM  

dramboxf: List utterly, completely fails without Burke.

Seriously...UTTER EPIC FAIL.


I thought you were talking about James Lee Burke and Dave Robicheaux.

Also: read the James Crumbley books a few years ago. If you want dark, "One to Count Cadence" and "Dancing Bear" are as black as they get. Lock up the liquor and guns while you're reading them.
 
2013-12-12 08:44:58 AM  
Seconds(or thirds) for Harry Dresden and Garret PI

Certainly Holmes would be more eccentric than hard boiled, but I can't fault the inclusion of HofB on this list.

Some authors I haven't heard of, time to update my reading list.(to be fair, outside of Holmes I tend towards fantasy elements in my PI reading).
 
2013-12-12 08:54:25 AM  
i.imgur.com
 
2013-12-12 09:23:56 AM  
How about Cecil Younger? The book titles are as great as the books.
 
2013-12-12 09:36:38 AM  

Bio-nic: [bookpeopleblog.files.wordpress.com image 850x637]

I will just leave this here....


This is what I came to say.
 
2013-12-12 09:47:08 AM  
The Big Sleep is hands down the best I've read of the genre. Despite that, Archie Goodwin is my favorite detective. Mike Hammer in I, The Jury is the most cheesiest garbage I've ever read.
 
2013-12-12 10:01:09 AM  
friday87central.files.wordpress.com
After a light snack of Oysters Baked in the Shell, Terrapin Maryland, Beaten Biscuits, Pan Broiled Young Turkey, Rice Croquettes with Quince Jelly, Lima Beans in Cream, Sally Lunn Avocado Todhunter, Pineapple Sherbet, Sponge Cake, Wisconsin Dairy Cheese, Black Coffee (and a milk for Archie) Nero and Archie frown on the omission.
 
2013-12-12 10:11:50 AM  
friday87central.files.wordpress.com

PFUI!
 
2013-12-12 12:31:10 PM  
asquian: Seconds(or thirds) for Harry Dresden and Garret PI

Certainly Holmes would be more eccentric than hard boiled, but I can't fault the inclusion of HofB on this list.

Some authors I haven't heard of, time to update my reading list.(to be fair, outside of Holmes I tend towards fantasy elements in my PI reading)
.

If you like getting some fantasy in your PI stories, just about all of the ones I listed have fantasy elements.
'Sam Vimes' is from Terry Pratchett's 'Discworld', and the stories there with him are *damn* good police procedurals.

Randall Garrett's 'Lord D'Arcy' is essentially Sherlock Holmes in an alternate universe where Magic was developed systematically, not Science.  His 'Watson' is Master Sean O'Laughlin, a forensic sorceror.  D'Arcy is Chief Investigator for the Duke of Normandy.  Garrett tends to play more fair with the reader than Doyle did.

Check out the Brit version of Life on Mars.  Sam Tyler is a DCI in 1997 who got hit by a car - and wakes up in 1974.  Is he Mad?  In a Coma?  or Back in Time?  Available on DVD.

Randall and Hopkirk (deceased) / My Partner the Ghost is a Brit series from the '70s.  Small, down at the heels detective agency.  Hopkirk gets murdered in the pilot episodes, returns as a ghost, and only his partner can see or hear him.  Humorous, and good.  Available on DVD, but takes some finding.

Elrod's 'The Vampire Files' takes place in Chicago, from 1936 to 1938.  Jack Fleming is a reporter, new in town from NYC, who soon gets murdered by the mob.  He comes back as a vampire, and is befriended by PI Charles Escott.  They make an interesting and effective team.
 
2013-12-12 12:41:01 PM  
No love for Takeshi Kovacs? Ah well. Who else hunts down hookers in strip clubs in the underbelly of futuristic Oakland for his wealthy benefactor?
 
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