If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Gawker)   Students too lazy to go to real college also too lazy to go to online college   (valleywag.gawker.com) divider line 86
    More: Obvious, distance education, San Jose State University, massive open online course, college credit, Sebastian Thrun, colleges  
•       •       •

6669 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Dec 2013 at 4:35 PM (40 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



86 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-12-11 04:36:33 PM
TL;DR
 
2013-12-11 04:36:36 PM
I'd criticize, but I'm too lazy to work while I'm at work.
 
2013-12-11 04:38:45 PM
Graduated from a real college, have tried and dropped out of several online courses. Yes, if you don't have real cash on the line, or at least some important goal to reach (studying for a real certification in order to get a real job) you're not going to take it seriously.
 
2013-12-11 04:43:10 PM
Young people these days don't have time for online courses.  Submitting assignments online so that some fuddy-duddy can grade them on his Grampa-box is not what the real world is like, and frankly, it's a waste of time to be giving these courses.  Of course, we shouldn't be going back to lectures in classrooms, unless you're part of the society for creative anachronism.

Colleges should be working on apps and games that allow students to complete fun assignments on the go.  Textbooks went out with the quill pen: instructors should be breaking books down into digestible paragraph-length summaries that can be read and learned quickly wherever and whenever is convenient.  These colleges should also be getting rid of the grading scales.  If you paid the tuition and did the work, why shouldn't you get an A?  It's not fair.

Just my two cents.
 
2013-12-11 04:44:15 PM
It's free, so people use it for different purposes than what it is meant for.

It's been 20 years since I last worked in electronics, so I took a basic electronics course in coursera. Didn't bother taking any of the tests, just skipped through using it as a refresher. So, course not finished, but still gave me what I wanted.

Same with a solar power, fuel cells and batteries course out of standford Uni, I worked through the solar part of that but wasn't interested in the fuel cells and batteries at the moment. Course not finished, but I got what I wanted.

There is no qualification that comes from these courses, so people aren't motivated the same way they are for other courses. They will come in with their own lists, take what they want and leave. But guess what, people are still learning
 
2013-12-11 04:44:36 PM
There are two problems with moocs. There is usually no credit. not even continuing education. and they have not figure out how to monetize them.

I say offer credit (have to convince credentialing orgs) and put advertising in to pay for it.

/Education Technology Masters Student
 
2013-12-11 04:45:09 PM
What's real and what's not real subbs?
 
2013-12-11 04:46:09 PM
Yeah... sounds like my ex-wife.
 
2013-12-11 04:49:27 PM
As a current graduate student at UIUC, I have had experience with real classes, online classes, and hybrid classes (a mix of both real and online).  I've only had one online course and it sucked.  It's hard to motivate yourself to do the assignments when you're just supposed to read stuff and take quizzes.  If that's all it takes to learn, why am I not just surfing Wikipedia all day?

The hybrid classes, honestly, are the best.  If done properly, they help you learn the material in your own time and confirm the information with the teacher when you meet face to face.
 
2013-12-11 04:49:41 PM
I'm doing a combination of online and in-class to earn an AAS for accounting while working full-time. It takes discipline; there are some days you finish work and want to just go home and relax, but you have to push yourself.

What more people need to understand is that not everyone NEEDS to get a four-year degree.  In my current technical writing job, I just wrote a report having to do with our local impending shortage of manufacturing and production technicians. I sat in on a forum of local engineering managers who said that they can't find enough people with two-year degrees to work in their facilities. These jobs pay really well, especially if you are a decent problem solver.

I think about all the people I know with 4-year degrees who are stuck in retail/service job hells because they just flat-out weren't aware of these kinds of positions, and it's sad. People busting ass for $10/hour could have earned a two year degree and gone to work at a factory and ended up with upper five-lower six figure incomes.

Unfortunately, it's almost taboo in high school for guidance counselors to push for anything less than a four-year degree. I don't get it.
 
2013-12-11 04:50:24 PM
Maybe if the online courses a had Meet Horny Singles in [your city] integrated into the shell more people would umm... climax finish.
 
2013-12-11 04:51:49 PM
The disadvantage of online courses is you have to teach yourself the material. Not all of us learn like that.
 
2013-12-11 04:52:09 PM
self directed learning is not a good solution to education because those who chose to self-direct their learning would have already done so. If you WANT to learn, you can on your own without an online course.

I feel it is a sad reality that too many people are being told "get a degree" so they go out and find these degree mill programs.

I have seen jobs being offered at 9.00/hour requiring a 4 year degree. I just sort of stare out those requirements and think about how far we have gone away from learning. 4 year degrees require 40-70% of the courses OUTSIDE of the field you studying (normally). If there is a 9.00 an hour job out there, then just tell the student exactly what classroom learning you want and do that rather than saying something stupid like requiring a 4 year (40,000-80,000 dollar) degree.
 
2013-12-11 04:52:56 PM

Orgasmatron138: I'm doing a combination of online and in-class to earn an AAS for accounting while working full-time. It takes discipline; there are some days you finish work and want to just go home and relax, but you have to push yourself.

What more people need to understand is that not everyone NEEDS to get a four-year degree.  In my current technical writing job, I just wrote a report having to do with our local impending shortage of manufacturing and production technicians. I sat in on a forum of local engineering managers who said that they can't find enough people with two-year degrees to work in their facilities. These jobs pay really well, especially if you are a decent problem solver.

I think about all the people I know with 4-year degrees who are stuck in retail/service job hells because they just flat-out weren't aware of these kinds of positions, and it's sad. People busting ass for $10/hour could have earned a two year degree and gone to work at a factory and ended up with upper five-lower six figure incomes.

Unfortunately, it's almost taboo in high school for guidance counselors to push for anything less than a four-year degree. I don't get it.


You know, this Toyota is really a great car and all, but let me show you this Ferrari.  If you really care about yourself, THIS is what you should get.  But, really, it's up to you.
 
2013-12-11 04:54:05 PM
I signed up for one of them online courses but they did not have any of those cute chicks in their pajamas like in the commercials so I quit.
 
2013-12-11 04:55:37 PM

TrollingForColumbine: There are two problems with moocs. There is usually no credit. not even continuing education. and they have not figure out how to monetize them.


Seems like those are pretty simple fixes, no?

The problem comes when for the very reason MOOC started in the first place - convenience and price - they drive colleges out of business. Either they undercut "traditional" college so much for the same (or similar) credentials on graduation as to run them out of business, or they wouldn't be officially "accredited", so whatever payment you make is wasted without test scores or a degree.

If you can get a Bachelors' from a MOOC for $50/course (which would still be too rich for some; at 8 courses per "year" x 4 years, your degree costs $1600. Not nothing, but nowhere near the 10x cost for a single year's tuition - or semester, or even half-semester for the Harvards).

I smell collusion, or at least the fear of loss of a business model.
 
2013-12-11 04:56:07 PM

iheartscotch: The disadvantage of online courses is you have to teach yourself the material. Not all of us learn like that.


Truth. I took a few in college, and they simply sucked. My first was a biomedical philosophy course. The prof wrote the book and course materials himself, and his mistakes made it into the exam, along with his personal biases.
 
2013-12-11 04:56:44 PM
The fraternities in online college are awesome.  Top shelf webcam porn.
 
2013-12-11 04:57:34 PM

thaduke: Young people these days don't have time for online courses.  Submitting assignments online so that some fuddy-duddy can grade them on his Grampa-box is not what the real world is like, and frankly, it's a waste of time to be giving these courses.  Of course, we shouldn't be going back to lectures in classrooms, unless you're part of the society for creative anachronism.

Colleges should be working on apps and games that allow students to complete fun assignments on the go.  Textbooks went out with the quill pen: instructors should be breaking books down into digestible paragraph-length summaries that can be read and learned quickly wherever and whenever is convenient.  These colleges should also be getting rid of the grading scales.  If you paid the tuition and did the work, why shouldn't you get an A?  It's not fair.

Just my two cents.


That little "It's not fair." at the end is the cherry atop of magnificent post.
 
2013-12-11 04:59:32 PM

thaduke: Young people these days don't have time for online courses.  Submitting assignments online so that some fuddy-duddy can grade them on his Grampa-box is not what the real world is like, and frankly, it's a waste of time to be giving these courses.  Of course, we shouldn't be going back to lectures in classrooms, unless you're part of the society for creative anachronism.

Colleges should be working on apps and games that allow students to complete fun assignments on the go.  Textbooks went out with the quill pen: instructors should be breaking books down into digestible paragraph-length summaries that can be read and learned quickly wherever and whenever is convenient.  These colleges should also be getting rid of the grading scales.  If you paid the tuition and did the work, why shouldn't you get an A?  It's not fair.

Just my two cents.


At first I was like...
 
2013-12-11 04:59:32 PM
Somebody needs to create a degree in Facebook and Twitter, with an emphasis on Instagram.

Problem solved.
 
2013-12-11 04:59:39 PM
I've taken a number of online classes and typically do better grade wise than classes I have to attend in person.
 
2013-12-11 05:00:44 PM

BumpInTheNight: thaduke: Young people these days don't have time for online courses.  Submitting assignments online so that some fuddy-duddy can grade them on his Grampa-box is not what the real world is like, and frankly, it's a waste of time to be giving these courses.  Of course, we shouldn't be going back to lectures in classrooms, unless you're part of the society for creative anachronism.

Colleges should be working on apps and games that allow students to complete fun assignments on the go.  Textbooks went out with the quill pen: instructors should be breaking books down into digestible paragraph-length summaries that can be read and learned quickly wherever and whenever is convenient.  These colleges should also be getting rid of the grading scales.  If you paid the tuition and did the work, why shouldn't you get an A?  It's not fair.

Just my two cents.

That little "It's not fair." at the end is the cherry atop of magnificent post.


It is masterful. "Grampa-box"   LOL
 
2013-12-11 05:01:29 PM

WhoGAS: Orgasmatron138: I'm doing a combination of online and in-class to earn an AAS for accounting while working full-time. It takes discipline; there are some days you finish work and want to just go home and relax, but you have to push yourself.

What more people need to understand is that not everyone NEEDS to get a four-year degree.  In my current technical writing job, I just wrote a report having to do with our local impending shortage of manufacturing and production technicians. I sat in on a forum of local engineering managers who said that they can't find enough people with two-year degrees to work in their facilities. These jobs pay really well, especially if you are a decent problem solver.

I think about all the people I know with 4-year degrees who are stuck in retail/service job hells because they just flat-out weren't aware of these kinds of positions, and it's sad. People busting ass for $10/hour could have earned a two year degree and gone to work at a factory and ended up with upper five-lower six figure incomes.

Unfortunately, it's almost taboo in high school for guidance counselors to push for anything less than a four-year degree. I don't get it.

You know, this Toyota is really a great car and all, but let me show you this Ferrari.  If you really care about yourself, THIS is what you should get.  But, really, it's up to you.


LOL good point. And I have a Toyota.
 
2013-12-11 05:01:51 PM
How are they students then?
 
2013-12-11 05:01:57 PM

thaduke: ...
Colleges should be working on apps and games that allow students to complete fun assignments on the go.  Textbooks went out with the quill pen: instructors should be breaking books down into digestible paragraph-length summaries ...


So everything has to be made into a game to keep a child like mind entertained.  And entire books full on complex and interrelated ideas should be predigested into 3 or 4 sentences.

Yeah; that will certainly develop a disciplined mind full of concepts and facts.  I mean; why teach engineering when you could just have students play with Hot Wheels?
 
2013-12-11 05:02:03 PM
img.gawkerassets.com

Pastebin for those who don't want to support Gawker:  http://pastebin.com/fSte2V9i
 
2013-12-11 05:03:46 PM

Orgasmatron138: Unfortunately, it's almost taboo in high school for guidance counselors to push for anything less than a four-year degree. I don't get it.


Only about 1/3 of the population graduates from a 4-year school. You'd think we'd recommend about the same proportion of high school graduates attend such schools, but for some reason we pretend that it's the right choice for everyone, and denigrate any other choice as inferior.

Which is not only really sad on an individual basis but also dumb in terms of our societal interests -- it not produces a lot of kids paying for and attending 2 years of a 4-year school without graduating, but also prevents us from providing enough vocational education in the first place, or from properly valuing such services. Community college is seen as a joke, but it's far and away the highest marginal ROI for higher education, and it's invaluable in terms of building and maintaining strong industry.
 
2013-12-11 05:06:13 PM
I never graduated college.  I went but it wasn't for me.  Waste of money to continue to show me things I already can do.  Got a good job without it in accounting/IT.  No biggie.  Got a house, lots of disposable income.  Why should I also waste time on an online college?
 
2013-12-11 05:08:03 PM

Smelly Pirate Hooker: Somebody needs to create a degree in Facebook and Twitter, with an emphasis on Instagram.

Problem solved.


I got my BS with Fark.
 
2013-12-11 05:10:28 PM
The only thing I wonder about Google glasses is how much they might hurt my nuckles...
 
2013-12-11 05:12:57 PM

tlenon: The only thing I wonder about Google glasses is how much they might hurt my nuckles...


Apparently they nocked the "k" right off your nuckles with a nife.
 
2013-12-11 05:17:19 PM

NicktheSmoker: No biggie. Got a house, lots of disposable income.


Are you the midget from wThe Cleveland Show?
 
2013-12-11 05:23:07 PM
Because everyone has to have a four-year degree and god help you if you suggest otherwise.

It's starting to change, slowly, but till then we'll have online degrees in underwater basketweaving.
 
2013-12-11 05:38:36 PM
I got my master's degree in aerospace engineering by taking online classes.  They sucked, but I'm not sure if it was because the classes were online or because they were graduate engineering courses.  One professor did tell me that in his experience, the online students never did very well.  I did end up dropping his class, but I eventually graduated.

My biggest problem was that I wasn't in the "school" mindset, so it was a lot harder to motivate myself.  In undergrad, all of my friends were in school, and everything was planned around classes and studying.  In grad school, I had a real job, and only knew one or two other people who were also in school.
 
2013-12-11 05:40:38 PM

FrancoFile: The fraternities in online college are awesome.  Top shelf webcam porn.


As a current grad student who works specifically with fraternities and sororities, this cracked me up.
 
2013-12-11 05:43:44 PM

Danger Avoid Death: Smelly Pirate Hooker: Somebody needs to create a degree in Facebook and Twitter, with an emphasis on Instagram.

Problem solved.

I got my BS with Fark.


JF = Juris Farkus
 
2013-12-11 05:43:46 PM
My roommates are "earning" their MBAs from the University of Florida through online courses at the moment.  A typical lecture for them includes turning on the computer, logging into class, then leaving for the bar while the professor on the other end lectures to a room of nonexistent students.  Occasionally they are required to contribute to the discussion, which usually takes place at the beginning of class to make sure everyone's there and takes all of 5-10 minutes to complete.  The "final exams" are usually papers of approximately 1500 words that they have 15 weeks to write, and there is little to no other form of assessment throughout the course.

At first I thought this was a fluke, but they are now on their sixth class and THEY ARE ALL THE SAME.  You would be hard pressed at this point to convince me that either online classes or MBAs are anything more than a joke.
 
2013-12-11 05:43:54 PM
I took an online course a couple years ago, it wasn't something I was invested in but was a pre-requisite for other classes I wanted. I was extremely glad I did though, because it was shockingly easy. Like the tests would only be 30 multiple choice questions and we had a whole hour to do them in. I realized after the first one I didn't even need to study, I could just bookmark the pages in the book that the test was supposed to cover. I saved myself a couple hours a week of boredom and hassle by not having to attend a class on campus.
 
2013-12-11 05:48:01 PM

nuqneh: I got my master's degree in aerospace engineering by taking online classes.  They sucked, but I'm not sure if it was because the classes were online or because they were graduate engineering courses.  One professor did tell me that in his experience, the online students never did very well.  I did end up dropping his class, but I eventually graduated.

My biggest problem was that I wasn't in the "school" mindset, so it was a lot harder to motivate myself.  In undergrad, all of my friends were in school, and everything was planned around classes and studying.  In grad school, I had a real job, and only knew one or two other people who were also in school.


Was your masters project the Challenger?

In a situation like this, you-you really don't wanna take the advice from a man who got a C minus in astrophysics.

-Billy Bob Thorton
Aerosmith video.
 
2013-12-11 05:50:46 PM

Gyrfalcon: Because everyone has to have a four-year degree and god help you if you suggest otherwise.

It's starting to change, slowly, but till then we'll have online degrees in underwater basketweaving.


Now if I could just get a snorkle for my laptop.
 
2013-12-11 05:53:54 PM
Been doing quite a few courses through Udacity, Coursera, edX. Finished nearly all of them...
The mathematics in the coursera course on Power Electronics left me behind, but continued with the lectures, didn't continue to bother about assignments & exam - I don't need to know how to optimise, calculate losses in components, I wanted to learn a good overview, both out of interest and the bits that relate to my current job... There is still plenty I can apply in real life.

OTOH, had one course where the content of the final exam seemed to have little to do with the content (or lack of it) in the course proper. Interesting to see that that course isn't being run again.

Interest is a huge motivating factor...
 
2013-12-11 05:54:45 PM

Danger Avoid Death: Gyrfalcon: Because everyone has to have a four-year degree and god help you if you suggest otherwise.

It's starting to change, slowly, but till then we'll have online degrees in underwater basketweaving.

Now if I could just get a snorkle for my laptop.


Didn't you hear?  The last iPhone update made them waterproof!  Its amazing!
 
2013-12-11 05:56:12 PM
I put in three years toward a 4 year degree when scholarship money ran out and I jumped into working full-time. If I could go back and finish my degree online, for free, hell yes I would.

Right now my only option is night classes at a for-profit private "college" that would require a shiatload of loans I don't need.
 
2013-12-11 06:02:34 PM

Pr1nc3ss: FrancoFile: The fraternities in online college are awesome.  Top shelf webcam porn.

As a current grad student who works specifically with fraternities and sororities, this cracked me up.


Anthropology, abnormal psychology, substance abuse counseling, or law?
 
2013-12-11 06:12:59 PM

browntimmy: I took an online course a couple years ago, it wasn't something I was invested in but was a pre-requisite for other classes I wanted. I was extremely glad I did though, because it was shockingly easy. Like the tests would only be 30 multiple choice questions and we had a whole hour to do them in. I realized after the first one I didn't even need to study, I could just bookmark the pages in the book that the test was supposed to cover. I saved myself a couple hours a week of boredom and hassle by not having to attend a class on campus.


Yes that does sound worthwhile.

RentalMetard: My roommates are "earning" their MBAs from the University of Florida through online courses at the moment.  A typical lecture for them includes turning on the computer, logging into class, then leaving for the bar while the professor on the other end lectures to a room of nonexistent students.  Occasionally they are required to contribute to the discussion, which usually takes place at the beginning of class to make sure everyone's there and takes all of 5-10 minutes to complete.  The "final exams" are usually papers of approximately 1500 words that they have 15 weeks to write, and there is little to no other form of assessment throughout the course.

At first I thought this was a fluke, but they are now on their sixth class and THEY ARE ALL THE SAME.  You would be hard pressed at this point to convince me that either online classes or MBAs are anything more than a joke.


I'm sure they're getting a lot out of it.
 
2013-12-11 06:15:05 PM

FrancoFile: Pr1nc3ss: FrancoFile: The fraternities in online college are awesome.  Top shelf webcam porn.

As a current grad student who works specifically with fraternities and sororities, this cracked me up.

Anthropology, abnormal psychology, substance abuse counseling, or law?


Administration and Supervision in Higher Education

My focus and research is on fraternities and sororities.
 
2013-12-11 06:15:17 PM

browntimmy: I took an online course a couple years ago, it wasn't something I was invested in but was a pre-requisite for other classes I wanted. I was extremely glad I did though, because it was shockingly easy. Like the tests would only be 30 multiple choice questions and we had a whole hour to do them in. I realized after the first one I didn't even need to study, I could just bookmark the pages in the book that the test was supposed to cover. I saved myself a couple hours a week of boredom and hassle by not having to attend a class on campus.


I've had a couple of online courses like that but most of them actually required a helluva lot more work than the in-person classes did. It depends on your professor and how he/she wants to run it. I prefer the in-person classes and feel like I learn more from them. Plus, it's easier to network IRL than it is by swapping anecdotes on a message board.

But if it's a subject you're already fairly familiar with, just take the online class.
 
2013-12-11 06:28:27 PM
I've always wondered - is it as embarrassing to go to University of Phoenix if you actually live in Phoenix as it is in other parts of the country?
 
2013-12-11 06:42:10 PM

FatherChaos: It's hard to motivate yourself to do the assignments when you're just supposed to read stuff and take quizzes.


Online classes were juuuuust getting started while I was in school.  I took a couple of upper level G.E. courses on line and it was fantastic.  Those a throw away classes anyway like "Disenfranchised Dog Walkers and Their Growing Distrust of Alternative Fuels" or whatever.

I found it very convenient to do all of the reading, watch all of the videos, and take all of the quizzes in a couple of cram weekends at the beginning of the quarter before the deadlines for the projects in my real classes started kicking it.  It really took a lot of pressure off.
 
Displayed 50 of 86 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report