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(Huffington Post UK)   England introducing indestructible plastic polymer bank notes; British residents rise to the challenge, break out microwaves, irons and fire to test them (pics)   (huffingtonpost.co.uk) divider line 24
    More: Amusing, Bank of England, Mark Carney, England, polymer notes, microwaves, combustible, Huffington Post UK, polymers  
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7237 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Dec 2013 at 9:22 AM (40 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



24 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-12-11 08:32:07 AM
In short, look after your banknotes - but try not to cook them too much or leave them in any metal containers near a heat source.

Just a light sauté, got it. I wonder what sauce they recommend?
 
2013-12-11 08:39:18 AM
Unless they are made of a mithril/adamantium alloy they aren't indestructible
 
2013-12-11 09:31:07 AM
I wonder if you can put them in the oven like Shrinky-Dinks.
 
2013-12-11 09:36:56 AM
Magpul PNotes.

Do want.
 
2013-12-11 09:44:47 AM
Apparently that's the reason Canada started with only the 100's. If you want to "test" a $100 bill and biatch that it's no longer any good. You're a complete idiot and you deserve to be $100 poorer.
 
2013-12-11 10:18:27 AM

hitmanric: Apparently that's the reason Canada started with only the 100's. If you want to "test" a $100 bill and biatch that it's no longer any good. You're a complete idiot and you deserve to be $100 poorer.


Yeah. They were claiming that sitting in the sun on a car dashboard was melting them. Who leaves a stack of hundreds on the dash? Similar thing happened with the introduction of the twoonie. People were popping the middles out with vises and hammers and then claiming that they just fell apart. The fad didn't last too long though.
 
2013-12-11 10:25:25 AM
All our new bills are polymer now in Canada.  I had a 5, 10, and 20 just yesterday.

I don't really like them you gotta be more careful that 2 bills aren't stuck together when you pay...and I have a feeling they'll turn to crap once they're folded a few times.
 
2013-12-11 10:25:33 AM
They should have started with the million pound note.

i.dailymail.co.uk

Obscure? Oh you betcha.
 
2013-12-11 10:26:51 AM
Subby, "plastic polymer"?


/redundant
 
2013-12-11 10:33:16 AM

Red_Fox: All our new bills are polymer now in Canada.  I had a 5, 10, and 20 just yesterday.

I don't really like them you gotta be more careful that 2 bills aren't stuck together when you pay...and I have a feeling they'll turn to crap once they're folded a few times.


You have a 'feeling'? Well aren't you special. Please, tell the world about your 'feeling' and how much these banknotes suck.
 
2013-12-11 10:42:42 AM
So the made money out of British food. Chrarming.
 
2013-12-11 11:27:59 AM
Anybody else hear that the Canadian notes crack and fall apart when they get really cold?
 
2013-12-11 12:34:28 PM
The Canadian ones are quite tear resistant until they get nicked on the edge -- then they tear with virtually 0- force applied.

I can believe that they could get brittle when very cold. Might try with a 5 in the freezer, or as we call it here "outside"
 
2013-12-11 01:25:25 PM
Years ago my Australian friend brought me back a few bucks of the new polymer money they have. It's pretty cool and long lasting. Wish they would change up US dollars like that, but I heard it would freak out people worldwide and economic hardships and some such stuff.

/The holograms are real cool too
 
2013-12-11 02:32:47 PM

groppet: Years ago my Australian friend brought me back a few bucks of the new polymer money they have. It's pretty cool and long lasting. Wish they would change up US dollars like that, but I heard it would freak out people worldwide and economic hardships and some such stuff.


So that's cool that it lasts a long time and stuff, but doesn't that actually make it harder to control the currency supply and potentially drive inflation? Cotton-paper currency degrades fast enough and it's cheap enough to make that it's easy to help control how much currency is floating around by removing old bills and introducing new ones in a controlled ratio. It costs 12.7 cents to print a $100 bill. How much does it cost to print one of these polymer notes?
 
2013-12-11 02:38:15 PM
There's really nothing to it.  Hong Kong has the 10 dollar notes (about a buck and a quarter in US currency) in plastic/polymer.  Climate there is tropical and very humid, but the notes seem pretty sturdy.  Never saw one with the ink run off or in bad shape.

It would be cool for the US to have 'em, but I'm sure the politicians in the paper industry pay would throw up a fit.
 
2013-12-11 02:40:20 PM

Stabone33: groppet: Years ago my Australian friend brought me back a few bucks of the new polymer money they have. It's pretty cool and long lasting. Wish they would change up US dollars like that, but I heard it would freak out people worldwide and economic hardships and some such stuff.

So that's cool that it lasts a long time and stuff, but doesn't that actually make it harder to control the currency supply and potentially drive inflation? Cotton-paper currency degrades fast enough and it's cheap enough to make that it's easy to help control how much currency is floating around by removing old bills and introducing new ones in a controlled ratio. It costs 12.7 cents to print a $100 bill. How much does it cost to print one of these polymer notes?


I'm thinking the initial cost vs. life of the poly note makes it more financially appealing. But of course if the US isn't doing it it must be a dumb idea.
 
2013-12-11 02:45:27 PM
www.ponziclawbacks.com
Lance, you look like a strong young pup. Why don't you see if you can give this a nice tear. Don't hurt yourself now.
 
2013-12-11 04:19:43 PM

Stabone33: groppet: Years ago my Australian friend brought me back a few bucks of the new polymer money they have. It's pretty cool and long lasting. Wish they would change up US dollars like that, but I heard it would freak out people worldwide and economic hardships and some such stuff.

So that's cool that it lasts a long time and stuff, but doesn't that actually make it harder to control the currency supply and potentially drive inflation? Cotton-paper currency degrades fast enough and it's cheap enough to make that it's easy to help control how much currency is floating around by removing old bills and introducing new ones in a controlled ratio. It costs 12.7 cents to print a $100 bill. How much does it cost to print one of these polymer notes?


Eh, not very much of the money supply is in pieces of paper/plastic - it's mostly just bank balances.
 
2013-12-11 04:59:44 PM
 
2013-12-11 06:50:06 PM
img.fark.net
 
2013-12-12 09:00:29 AM

Russ1642: Red_Fox: All our new bills are polymer now in Canada.  I had a 5, 10, and 20 just yesterday.

I don't really like them you gotta be more careful that 2 bills aren't stuck together when you pay...and I have a feeling they'll turn to crap once they're folded a few times.

You have a 'feeling'? Well aren't you special. Please, tell the world about your 'feeling' and how much these banknotes suck.


Hey, can you see music?
 
2013-12-12 11:44:25 AM
I'm often amazed at these herculean efforts to re-design CASH. Am I the only one using less and less (or maybe just having less and less) cash every year? We debit card almost everything now - I though cash would be dying out...

/will they make polymer checks, too?
//if so, will bouncing a check become a literal thing?
///I'm thinking about this too hard, aren't I?
 
2013-12-12 01:30:28 PM

denverstevens: I'm often amazed at these herculean efforts to re-design CASH. Am I the only one using less and less (or maybe just having less and less) cash every year? We debit card almost everything now - I though cash would be dying out...

/will they make polymer checks, too?
//if so, will bouncing a check become a literal thing?
///I'm thinking about this too hard, aren't I?


Criminals use cash. We are trying to protect them from getting cheated on their transactions by making it harder to counterfeit. Criminals are people too.
 
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