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(Yahoo)   Christmas wish list from 1915 will make you feel a failure as a parent, disdain for today's kids   (gma.yahoo.com) divider line 9
    More: Interesting, Christmastime, losers, parents  
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949 clicks; posted to FarkUs » on 10 Dec 2013 at 8:09 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



9 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-12-10 08:01:21 AM  
It actually makes me feel like a pretty good parent that my child does not have to beg Santa for basic school supplies.
 
2013-12-10 08:05:06 AM  

namegoeshere: It actually makes me feel like a pretty good parent that my child does not have to beg Santa for basic school supplies.


And food, don't forget that he is also begging for food.

/they sound poor, but polite.
//The best kind of poor folk, the ones that know their place.
 
2013-12-10 08:32:33 AM  
Is this the thread where we talk about how the world is going to hell in a handbasket?  If so, allow me to start:

Parents these days are producing dependent adults, and the world's going to hell in a handbasket.
 
2013-12-10 10:21:30 AM  
The list I got from my neiphew.  Beats headphones, Beats pill speaker, Oakleys, Ultimate Lego kits......  I love ya kid but I aint spending $200 on headphones for you.

Sis what the heck did you do to turn your kids into brand whores so much?  I want to know so I can turn my kids away from that course.
 
2013-12-10 10:47:46 AM  

EvilEgg: namegoeshere: It actually makes me feel like a pretty good parent that my child does not have to beg Santa for basic school supplies.

And food, don't forget that he is also begging for food.

/they sound poor, but polite.
//The best kind of poor folk, the ones that know their place.


You owe me an eggy sammich, dammit.
 
2013-12-10 11:35:31 AM  
There are still kids who ask for these things. They're called "The Poor".

And people can help them, isn't that neat? No, really: you can donate and everything- nobody minds.
 
2013-12-10 03:21:15 PM  
One of my nephews asked for socks and to not have to eat spaghetti sauce, one of them wouldn't sit still long enough to answer the question, and the chubby little one doesn't talk yet.
 
2013-12-10 09:03:08 PM  
Well if you think about this, those are the kind of things kids would want back then. What do you expect a kid from 1915 to ask for, an XBox? In 1915 they didn't have entire stores devoted to kids toys and the ridiculous commercialism we have today, most kids had few toys because they simply didn't exist.
 
2013-12-11 09:07:39 AM  
My father's family didn't have a lot growing up - his mother died of cancer summer of '45 after being sick for a really long time; the medical bills were soul-crushing. My Grandfather made the final payment to the hospital - in '68 or '69.

So stories with themes reflecting - be happy/satisfied with what you have were fairly common.

Often repeated Christmas story growing up:

My father's best friend (1st cousin) in the 30's - I believe he was 10 or so - was asked what he wanted in his stocking for Christmas.

He replied he wanted a can of peaches. If I remember correctly he got two - and didn't have to share...

Kid got his parent's permission to join the service at 16, was killed at Okinawa.

/Not one of our family's happier Christmas stories, sorry; but always the first thing that pops into my head when I see Christmas decorations going up the day after 'Thanksgiving'.
Literally, the thought is: 'that would buy a pallet or two of peach cans'. Probably doesn't scan out of context, eh?

//Ho Ho. Ho.
 
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