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(Slate)   One brave writer recounts how Foodie prejudice against garlic powder cost him some of the best formative years of his eating life   (slate.com) divider line 156
    More: Sad, Kitchen Confidential, industrial products, culinary school, nutmeg, bias, ingredients, Oregonians, garlic  
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8265 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Dec 2013 at 2:30 PM (18 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-09 01:40:37 PM
Garlic powder is awesome, but it has to be of at least a somewhat granular consistency. McCormick, for example, makes a passable garlic powder. Spice Island garlic powder, on the other hand, is so powdery soft and inconsequential that it is utterly without purpose, and the people who buy it should be viewed with deep, deep suspicion.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2013-12-09 01:47:56 PM

Pocket Ninja: Garlic powder is awesome, but it has to be of at least a somewhat granular consistency. McCormick, for example, makes a passable garlic powder. Spice Island garlic powder, on the other hand, is so powdery soft and inconsequential that it is utterly without purpose, and the people who buy it should be viewed with deep, deep suspicion.


Nonsense.  Have you ever tried to snort a couple of lines of granulated garlic?  It makes you sneeze something terrible.
 
2013-12-09 02:16:39 PM
This is such sh*t.  Any professional chef who didn't start off as a "foodie" uses garlic powder.  Same goes for ketchup, MSG, Mortons salt, bottom shelf port, port, sherry. liquor, and wine. That culinary school bullsh*t works in only two places--culinary school and perhaps your own private home kitchen.  Anybody who relies on an arbitrary absolutist reaction to professional cooking is doomed to fail.  (Yes, I get the irony of that statement)
 
2013-12-09 02:19:37 PM
I put garlic powder on my pizza.  It's provided among the accouterments.
 
2013-12-09 02:32:01 PM
Slate needs to be bombed.
 
2013-12-09 02:33:41 PM
whynotboth.jpg
 
2013-12-09 02:35:26 PM

thamike: This is such sh*t.  Any professional chef who didn't start off as a "foodie" uses garlic powder.  Same goes for ketchup, MSG, Mortons salt, bottom shelf port, port, sherry. liquor, and wine. That culinary school bullsh*t works in only two places--culinary school and perhaps your own private home kitchen.  Anybody who relies on an arbitrary absolutist reaction to professional cooking is doomed to fail.  (Yes, I get the irony of that statement)


These are the same chefs who thing slapping a dollop of mango chutney, a slice of avocado, and a handful of cilantro on everything is cooking.
 
2013-12-09 02:36:27 PM
This just in: Top names in their field have differing opinions; overly devoted acolytes use those opinions to hammer their own head up their own ass rather than examine and experiment with their own opinions on the matter.
 
2013-12-09 02:36:59 PM
Ok, fresh is better, but we don't have time for it, because the ROI of smooshing garlic sucks.
 
2013-12-09 02:37:02 PM
Garlic powder has its place where it is superior to fresh raw garlic. In rubs for example. Show me how the fark you are going to make a DRY rub with a mess of soggy ass garlic?

Anyone that has made great BBQ knows that garlic powder, onion powder and other dry powders are essential.
 
2013-12-09 02:37:07 PM
It sure was dusty in that article.  It always warms my heart when someone can make that change, deep inside, to accept something that they once railed against.  Blacks, gays, garlic powder... we're setting aside our prejudgements, one by one.
 
2013-12-09 02:37:29 PM
The author sounds white... like Miracle Whip white.
 
2013-12-09 02:38:20 PM

Pocket Ninja: Garlic powder is awesome, but it has to be of at least a somewhat granular consistency. McCormick, for example, makes a passable garlic powder. Spice Island garlic powder, on the other hand, is so powdery soft and inconsequential that it is utterly without purpose, and the people who buy it should be viewed with deep, deep suspicion.


What I use all the time is McCormick Granulated Onion. It goes in and on just about everything. Great on dehydrated kale chips.

/I also use a ton of McCormicks Dried Parsley
/I use fresh onions and fresh parsley
/and I recognized the idiocy of using dried onion in a dehydrator
 
2013-12-09 02:38:34 PM
"foodies" are obnoxious idiots
 
2013-12-09 02:39:26 PM
By foodies do they mean people who actually like food or elitists who use food as a medium?

There's a big difference there.
 
2013-12-09 02:40:08 PM

TheShavingofOccam123: Great on dehydrated kale chips.


Do you have a "best recipe" that you can point to?  I've seen a few ways of making those and I'd like to give it a try.
 
2013-12-09 02:40:57 PM
I gotta say, Slate is really giving CNN a run for its money on a rapid downturn into the insipid and facile.
 
2013-12-09 02:41:32 PM

abhorrent1: "foodies" are obnoxious idiots


I don't think foodie is even a real thing anymore.  Foodie is the new hipster.
 
2013-12-09 02:45:22 PM
"Garlic powder and all it's [sic] many cousins (garlic salt, garlic paste, prepeeled garlic cloves) may be great for the busy cook, but they are not nearly the taste treat pure garlic clove is for the eater."

Pre-peeled garlic cloves  are pure garlic cloves. They're just peeled. As long as you buy them fresh and use them quickly, like say in a 40-clove roast chicken or the like, there's no reason to disdain them and peel your own.
 
2013-12-09 02:45:44 PM

thamike: This is such sh*t.  Any professional chef who didn't start off as a "foodie" uses garlic powder.  Same goes for ketchup, MSG, Mortons salt, bottom shelf port, port, sherry. liquor, and wine. That culinary school bullsh*t works in only two places--culinary school and perhaps your own private home kitchen.  Anybody who relies on an arbitrary absolutist reaction to professional cooking is doomed to fail.  (Yes, I get the irony of that statement)


Most chefs do not use MSG as there are many people who have adverse reactions to that neurotoxin. I specifically make sure that no ingredients that I purchase have MSG.

Only Chinese restaurants use MSG to make cheap ingredients taste flavorful.

Most chefs have switched from Mortons Salt to Kosher Salt except on the guests tables because the coarse Kosher Salt won't fit through the holes.

/Uses Garlic Salt
//also uses fresh garlic
 
2013-12-09 02:45:55 PM

TheShavingofOccam123: What I use all the time is McCormick Granulated Onion.


It's magical flavor glue.  I swear by it to enhance and preserve the flavor of pretty much anything from stocks to reductions.
 
2013-12-09 02:46:56 PM
Many foodies look down on garlic powder as a stale, cheap substitute for the real thing.

That's because it usually is. The shiat sits on the shelves forever, and then sits in the back f your spice rack even longer. It doesn't take all that much effort to throw a few cloves in a garlic press. Then again, if you're having Spaghetti-O's, it works perfectly. Really classes up the joint, if you know what I mean.
 
2013-12-09 02:47:30 PM
Garlic powder and sea salt go well together on a lot of foods.
 
2013-12-09 02:48:49 PM

Theaetetus: "Garlic powder and all it's [sic] many cousins (garlic salt, garlic paste, prepeeled garlic cloves) may be great for the busy cook, but they are not nearly the taste treat pure garlic clove is for the eater."

Pre-peeled garlic cloves  are pure garlic cloves. They're just peeled. As long as you buy them fresh and use them quickly, like say in a 40-clove roast chicken or the like, there's no reason to disdain them and peel your own.


No, but it costs more.

maniacbastard: Garlic powder has its place where it is superior to fresh raw garlic. In rubs for example. Show me how the fark you are going to make a DRY rub with a mess of soggy ass garlic?

Anyone that has made great BBQ knows that garlic powder, onion powder and other dry powders are essential.


OK, a rub is one of the times when the dehydrated powders are your best choice, but the rest of the time, fresh is just as easy. I don't understand people who can't figure out a garlic press...
 
2013-12-09 02:50:16 PM
Yet you give that same chef some fresh oregano and they start whining that it's no good until it's dried out.

These people are just monsters.  Remember that when you're reaching for your jar of Mrs. Dash.
 
2013-12-09 02:51:05 PM

treesloth: TheShavingofOccam123: Great on dehydrated kale chips.

Do you have a "best recipe" that you can point to?  I've seen a few ways of making those and I'd like to give it a try.


Well, what I do is wash the kale first, then spin it in a huge salad spinner I bought on Amazon. While the 2 or 3 pounds of kale finishes drying, I put about 2 or 3 tablespoons of olive oil, 1 or 2 tablespoons of lime juice and 5 or 6 good squirts of Red Devil cayenne sauce in a huge bowl and mix the liquid together. Then I put in some yeast flakes, Cholula powder, coarse kosher salt, fresh ground pepper, granulated onion and mix together with the liquids. Then dump all the kale into the bowl and flip and massage the kale till well coated. I add more dry ingredients if I think it needs it. Toss the kale around some more. Put the leaves into a dehydrator with the fruit leather trays installed. Then I sprinkle each tray with one of the dry ingredients or maybe some lime juice or cayenne sauce. That way each tray tastes different than every other tray.

Dehydrate overnight at 135 degrees.

That's what I do. It's all just tossed together and varies between batches.
 
2013-12-09 02:51:28 PM

ikanreed: Ok, fresh is better, but we don't have time for it, because the ROI of smooshing garlic sucks.


Two words: Garlic press

3.bp.blogspot.com

What, too mainstream?
 
2013-12-09 02:51:46 PM

Mikey1969: I don't understand people who can't figure out a garlic press...


SATAN INCARNATE!!!!  Garlic must be minced with a sharp knife.  If you're going to use a press, don't bother.  Just smash it into a paste using the side of your knife.
 
2013-12-09 02:52:59 PM
Minced is the way to go.  It's delicious, has really good garlic flavor and is just as convenient as garlic powder.

www.ourbestbites.com

but they are not nearly the taste treat pure garlic clove is for the eater

If you're going to go all douchey, then you may as well specify it should be home grown garlic cloves.  You can buy all sorts of nasty flavorless garlic cloves in the grocery store that are actually worse tasting than garlic powder.
 
2013-12-09 02:54:35 PM

Danger Avoid Death: ikanreed: Ok, fresh is better, but we don't have time for it, because the ROI of smooshing garlic sucks.

Two words: Garlic press



What, too mainstream?


There's a time for chopped garlic, a time for pressed and a time for granulated and generally they are not interchangeable.
 
2013-12-09 02:54:35 PM

lennavan: Minced is the way to go.  It's delicious, has really good garlic flavor and is just as convenient as garlic powder.

[www.ourbestbites.com image 430x287]

but they are not nearly the taste treat pure garlic clove is for the eater

If you're going to go all douchey, then you may as well specify it should be home grown garlic cloves.  You can buy all sorts of nasty flavorless garlic cloves in the grocery store that are actually worse tasting than garlic powder.


And then they completely failed to tel you to remove that nasty germ from the center of the clove.  If you're going all hoitsie toitsie, you go all the way.
 
2013-12-09 02:55:01 PM
I like the analogy to MSG.  It's an apt analogy.  Garlic powder does give certain foods that certain something (not garlic flavor) that makes them taste better.  On meats especially. Steak, burgers, poultry, pork, lamb, fish.  If you use fresh garlic, no matter how prepared, you still taste the garlic.  You can add small amounts of garlic powder and not taste the garlic, but your tongue will thank you.
 
2013-12-09 02:55:16 PM
"Too much food in America, man. ... You think anyone in Rwanda's got a f*ckin' lactose intolerance problem with powdered garlic?" ~Chris Rock
 
2013-12-09 02:55:51 PM
I love how the article starts out as ostensibly being a common-man entreaty to evil, exclusionary "foodies" about accepting garlic powder as a viable ingredient, but then at the end claims that the only acceptable garlic powder is that made from garlic you grow yourself on your green roof in Brooklyn, dry in a $500 dehydrator, and grind using a fair-trade mortar and pestle obtained from the indigenous peoples of Patagonia through a system of complex hand gestures and the bartering of services.
 
2013-12-09 02:56:20 PM
MiamiChef:

Most chefs do not use MSG as there are many people who have adverse reactions to that neurotoxin. I specifically make sure that no ingredients that I purchase have MSG.


This is a myth.

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2009/aug/12/msg-allergy-chi ne se-restaurant-syndrome-myth
 
2013-12-09 02:56:31 PM

Theaetetus: "Garlic powder and all it's [sic] many cousins (garlic salt, garlic paste, prepeeled garlic cloves) may be great for the busy cook, but they are not nearly the taste treat pure garlic clove is for the eater."

Pre-peeled garlic cloves  are pure garlic cloves. They're just peeled. As long as you buy them fresh and use them quickly, like say in a 40-clove roast chicken or the like, there's no reason to disdain them and peel your own.


You can also store them in olive oil. The olive oil gets all garlicky and yummy and the cloves keep longer without browning and spoiling.
 
2013-12-09 02:56:33 PM
there are some things that powder is far superior for

the biggest problem however is finding garlic in "fresh" or powder form that is NOT from China.
 
2013-12-09 02:56:52 PM
And BTW, fark garlic presses.  Micro plane is better.
 
2013-12-09 02:56:57 PM

Danger Avoid Death: Two words: Garlic press


People like this *coughAnthonyBourdaincough* hate garlic presses too. Too lazy to peel fresh? You don't deserve garlic!
 
2013-12-09 02:57:09 PM
 

MiamiChef: Most chefs do not use MSG as there are many people who have adverse reactions to that neurotoxin. I specifically make sure that no ingredients that I purchase have MSG.

Only Chinese restaurants use MSG to make cheap ingredients taste flavorful.


static1.wikia.nocookie.net

MiamiChef: Most chefs have switched from Mortons Salt to Kosher Salt except on the guests tables because the coarse Kosher Salt won't fit through the holes.


planetblade.com
 
2013-12-09 02:58:49 PM

maniacbastard: Anyone that has made great BBQ knows that garlic powder, onion powder and other dry powders are essential.


Bingo.

Specially, if you are using anything runnier than ketchup, like vinegar. You got to thicken it up somehow.
Now you can use honey, or molasses, but that will sweeten it, too.
If you are trying to go away from sweet, you need something else, Shy of a roux.
 
2013-12-09 02:58:50 PM
From my experience, fresh garlic has better flavor when used in dishes that don't require you to cook the hell of it, and dishes that have oil-based components. Why you wouldn't use fresh when possible is beyond me.

Garlic powder is superior when adding to things like rubs, or other things that require dissolution, like soups and (some) sauces. It is also awesome if you are in a time crunch (like in most professional kitchens).

You've got to use the best tool, or in this case food, that is ready for the job.
 
2013-12-09 03:02:09 PM

kvinesknows: the biggest problem however is finding garlic in "fresh" or powder form that is NOT from China.


China had a garlic bubble back in 2009, and the next year the entire nation planted about a gazillion tons of the stuff.  The resulting worldwide glut let them corner the market.

You can get garlic from California but you have to really work at it.
 
2013-12-09 03:02:59 PM

imashark: From my experience, fresh garlic has better flavor when used in dishes that don't require you to cook the hell of it, and dishes that have oil-based components. Why you wouldn't use fresh when possible is beyond me. Garlic powder is superior when adding to things like rubs, or other things that require dissolution, like soups and (some) sauces. It is also awesome if you are in a time crunch (like in most professional kitchens). You've got to use the best tool, or in this case food, that is ready for the job.


The problem is people who think garlic powder is meant as a substitute for garlic, onion powder a substitute for onions, MSG is a substitute for flavor, etc. That's the sort of dumb-headed thinking that separates "foodies" from good cooks.
 
2013-12-09 03:04:08 PM
Oh yeah - granulated garlic is good, but if you read the article, he's as snotty as the foodies - you must make your own.  Ar.
 
2013-12-09 03:04:32 PM

Marcus Aurelius: kvinesknows: the biggest problem however is finding garlic in "fresh" or powder form that is NOT from China.

China had a garlic bubble back in 2009, and the next year the entire nation planted about a gazillion tons of the stuff.  The resulting worldwide glut let them corner the market.

You can get garlic from California but you have to really work at it.


Yeah. Someone was spreading rumors of garlic powder being a good substitute for tiger penis dust and the entire industry just went nuts.
 
2013-12-09 03:04:47 PM
Some garlic powder, salt, and worcestershier sauce in ground beef makes for some incredible burgers.
 
2013-12-09 03:04:57 PM

Pocket Ninja: powdery soft and inconsequential that it is utterly without purpose, and the people who buy it should be viewed with deep, deep suspicion.


That's dollar store garlic powder.
 
2013-12-09 03:05:13 PM

vudukungfu: Specially, if you are using anything runnier than ketchup, like vinegar. You got to thicken it up somehow.


You thicken it up by heating it low and slow and boiling off liquid.  It's called a reduction.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reduction_%28cooking%29
 
2013-12-09 03:06:02 PM

Fuggin Bizzy: Danger Avoid Death: Two words: Garlic press

People like this *coughAnthonyBourdaincough* hate garlic presses too. Too lazy to peel fresh? You don't deserve garlic!


Well, you do peel the garlic before you press it, so I just don't get the distinction. I must not be a true Foodie. Thank God. What a bunch of douchesnobs.
 
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