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(From Quarks to Quasars)   "Imagine a screw traveling 20,000 miles an hour). That debris would then hit other objects in orbit, which creates more debris and hits more objects and....you get the picture"   (fromquarkstoquasars.com) divider line 83
    More: Scary, space junk, communication satellites, orbits, space systems, EPFL, Lausanne, ETH Zurich  
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3704 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Dec 2013 at 11:45 AM (46 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-09 04:19:36 PM  

CSM101: Mass effect 3 had it's moments. that was one of them.

/the opposite clone dlc was fun, too


That was ME2, not ME3.

Always thought it was funny that the Gunnery Chief was waving around the "20-kilo" projectile like it was a toy (the game even used the disk grenade prop!). Just how strong was the dude supposed to be, that he could toss around a 50lb object one-handed and not strain himself? Nevermind that it's a 50lb iron object the size of a drink coaster. What the hell were they doing to be able to compress iron to 5 times the density of lead?!
 
2013-12-09 04:20:46 PM  

cranked: Quantum Apostrophe: It's the people that think we'll colonize the universe.

We're in a thread about debris that is actually in orbit around our actual planet, put there by actual people using actual science.  The only one going on about 'colonizing the universe', as usual, is you.  While you occasionally make interesting (and obvious points) you immediately follow up with a straw man larger than can reasonably be created with any number of 3D printers and then thrash the hell out of it, all the while explaining to everyone else how stupid they sound.


Oh come on. You know as well as I do that about a half dozen Farkers pulled down their pants at "orbit", and 5 of those came at "objects", probably while still bent over from taking off their pants.

Debris in orbit around our planet at about 0.1 radii. Yippee yay, let me pack my suitcase for Mars.

And if my points were so obvious, you'd think they'd start sinking in by now.

Jeez, just the other day someone told me in all seriousness we aren't really exploring space because we aren't walking on the Moon.

This delusion about people in space is powerful stuff.

It fascinates me to no end.

But not as much as people with a lifespan measured in a handful of decades babbling on and on about the whole species and its future in space.... Usually by people so warped, depressed, misanthropic, self-loathing and un self-aware that they see no problem about not caring about the people alive today.

Sickness.
 
2013-12-09 04:23:21 PM  
Dingleberry Dickwad:

Forget it, he's rolling.

You assume that I am not enjoying this.
 
2013-12-09 04:25:52 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: caring about the people alive today.


Is there a reason we should?
 
2013-12-09 04:42:10 PM  
How is it that Kerbin can keep launching stuff with all that orbiting debris?
 
2013-12-09 04:47:26 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Oh come on. You know as well as I do that about a half dozen Farkers pulled down their pants at "orbit", and 5 of those came at "objects", probably while still bent over from taking off their pants.

Debris in orbit around our planet at about 0.1 radii. Yippee yay, let me pack my suitcase for Mars.


^- Case in point.

And if my points were so obvious, you'd think they'd start sinking in by now.

Points about practical limits to energy, practical limits to current technology, yada yada are obvious and well understood concepts. When you hurdle past those to "science is at a dead end, this is it" you seem to feel that you're on the same solid ground. Your reaction to people that disagree with that last premise is what gets you the nick "TechnoBevets".

It fascinates me to no end.
 

I don't think "fascinates" is the word we're looking for here.

Usually by people so warped, depressed, misanthropic, self-loathing and un self-aware ...

Hmm
 
2013-12-09 04:54:51 PM  

Dingleberry Dickwad: Quantum Apostrophe: caring about the people alive today.

Is there a reason we should?


And why should I care about a future species that may not even be human anymore because evolution is still happening?

You're either trolling or a psychopath.

Gaddiel: What, am I not agreeing with you? Modern science knows everything. We have a full and complete understanding of the universe and nothing will ever change! Previously held notions about physics have never been disproved or found to be false or incomplete. Never ever will someone figure out new methods of energy storage, energy generation, or locomotion, or how to manipulate relativity or some other ridiculous bit of science fiction nonsense. It's fixed, final, finito, fait. Right?


Show me some new physics, some new engineering at the scale required, some particle we overlooked, some chemical element that's missing from the periodic table, I'll change my mind.

Keep in mind that if our science is wrong, doesn't that mean the observations we make about space could be wrong as well? Like maybe it's even more hostile than we could have imagined?

But no, let me guess, THAT science is beyond question!

Space is an endless continuation of Western post WWII society. But with rockets.

When you start invoking "yeah but we don't know everything" you invoke magic, faith, superstition and religion.

Given what we DO know? Don't pack your bags for Mars just yet.

But all you need to show me is some crack in our understanding of physics at our scale.

That's all I ask for. Show it to me, don't just wish about it.

If we DID suddenly find new methods of energy generation, wouldn't that mean the Earth ISN'T running out of resources? So why space?

If we DID suddenly find magical new materials here on Earth, why do we need to mine asteroids again?

If we DID have sci-fi asteroid mining robots, why wouldn't we just build and use those robots... right here?

That's another Space Nutter trademark: self-contradiction.

"All we need is to find magical energy sources so we can go into space to put up solar panels!"

Uh why, if we have a magical energy source?

I picked a fine day to be snowed in with never-ending Earl Grey, eh?
 
2013-12-09 04:54:51 PM  

Millennium: We need a hero.
We need a cleaner.
We need... SPACE ROOMBA


Why? We already have a guy for that, goes by the name "Roger Wilco"

upload.wikimedia.org:
 
2013-12-09 05:01:21 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Gaddiel: What, am I not agreeing with you? Modern science knows everything. We have a full and complete understanding of the universe and nothing will ever change! Previously held notions about physics have never been disproved or found to be false or incomplete. Never ever will someone figure out new methods of energy storage, energy generation, or locomotion, or how to manipulate relativity or some other ridiculous bit of science fiction nonsense. It's fixed, final, finito, fait. Right?

Show me some new physics, some new engineering at the scale required, some particle we overlooked, some chemical element that's missing from the periodic table, I'll change my mind.


So wait a minute, your logic is that "Because we don't know what we don't know, it doesn't exist so don't bother."? We don't know what it will take to stop aging either, should we stop bothering? We don't know what will safely and reliably stop cancer without causing serious issues to the patient, does that mean we stop looking?

You're either a troll or ... nah fark it, you're a troll because not even the politics tab rejects are that stupid.
 
2013-12-09 05:03:44 PM  

InfrasonicTom: A butterfly flaps its wings in geosynchronous orbit...


... and thinks "Oh no, not again!"
 
2013-12-09 05:08:12 PM  

ikanreed: PsyLord: FTA: ...(imagine a screw traveling 20,000 miles an hour). That debris would then hit other objects in orbit

Aren't the other objects in orbit also traveling roughly the same speed?  The way they stated it in the article made it sound as though the screw is going to impact something that was not moving, so in essence a 20k mph hit.

No, because orbits do not all have the same direction and profile.  An elliptical orbit between 10k and 100k is going to have way more speed than the object steady at 10k.


It depends on where you are in the orbit.  A 10kx100k orbit is going to have higher velocity at the 10k point and be realtively leisurely at the 100k point.
 
2013-12-09 05:22:52 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Keep in mind that if our science is wrong, doesn't that mean the observations we make about space could be wrong as well? Like maybe it's even more hostile than we could have imagined?


We already know that space is hostile enough to wipe out life on Earth. That's reason enough to get out of the nest before it happens.
 
2013-12-09 05:25:45 PM  

Dingleberry Dickwad: your logic is that "Because we don't know what we don't know, it doesn't exist so don't bother."?


No, my logic is given what we do know, don't bother. Otherwise you can justify ANYTHING. Why is it that science will offer these incredible breakthroughs to allow space colonies, but not longer life?

It's not even that! You don't even WANT longer life!

In a universe 30 billion light years across, this is sane?

Dingleberry Dickwad: We don't know what it will take to stop aging either,


But given that there are already life forms that offer clues, it's orders of magnitude more likely to happen than Disney World on Mars.

Dingleberry Dickwad: We don't know what will safely and reliably stop cancer without causing serious issues to the patient, does that mean we stop looking?


Cancer exists. Patients exist.

Space fantasies? Not even a whimper of them.

Dingleberry Dickwad: You're either a troll or ... nah fark it, you're a troll because not even the politics tab rejects are that stupid.


There is another path: YOU are stupid.

It's a sign of wisdom to question your beliefs.

Look inside you, you know I am right.
 
2013-12-09 05:27:02 PM  

Tobin_Lam: ikanreed: PsyLord: FTA: ...(imagine a screw traveling 20,000 miles an hour). That debris would then hit other objects in orbit

Aren't the other objects in orbit also traveling roughly the same speed?  The way they stated it in the article made it sound as though the screw is going to impact something that was not moving, so in essence a 20k mph hit.

No, because orbits do not all have the same direction and profile.  An elliptical orbit between 10k and 100k is going to have way more speed than the object steady at 10k.

It depends on where you are in the orbit.  A 10kx100k orbit is going to have higher velocity at the 10k point and be realtively leisurely at the 100k point.


It depends on where the object is in orbit? How about you make an educated guess about the chances of a collision being imminent between one object at the 10k point and another at the 100k point.
 
2013-12-09 05:33:16 PM  

DerAppie: How about you make an educated guess about the chances of a collision being imminent between one object at the 10k point and another at the 100k point.


Uh, you think we know everything there is to know about science, bub?

"Modern science knows everything. We have a full and complete understanding of the universe and nothing will ever change! "

Is that what you're saying???? Hmmm? What if one piece of debris can like, teleport and shiat to another orbital plane?

What THEN Mr I Know All About Science????

/According to the DSM-V, I have to add a disclaimer about reading the above post in the appropriate tone of voice
 
2013-12-09 05:36:05 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Dingleberry Dickwad: your logic is that "Because we don't know what we don't know, it doesn't exist so don't bother."?

No, my logic is given what we do know, don't bother. Otherwise you can justify ANYTHING. Why is it that science will offer these incredible breakthroughs to allow space colonies, but not longer life?

It's not even that! You don't even WANT longer life!

In a universe 30 billion light years across, this is sane?


Strawman, no one in here said anything about longer life or that figuring out life extension is mutually exclusive from learning more in other fields that would allow space travel. Point dismissed.

Quantum Apostrophe: Dingleberry Dickwad: We don't know what it will take to stop aging either,

But given that there are already life forms that offer clues, it's orders of magnitude more likely to happen than Disney World on Mars.


Another strawman, no one said anything about colonizing mars except you. Point dismissed.

Quantum Apostrophe: Dingleberry Dickwad: We don't know what will safely and reliably stop cancer without causing serious issues to the patient, does that mean we stop looking?

Cancer exists. Patients exist.

Space fantasies? Not even a whimper of them.


Bzzzzzt, foul on the play. Vague dismissal with no backing info. Point dismissed.

Quantum Apostrophe: Dingleberry Dickwad: You're either a troll or ... nah fark it, you're a troll because not even the politics tab rejects are that stupid.

There is another path: YOU are stupid.

It's a sign of wisdom to question your beliefs.


Kettle meet pot and reconvene when you've stopped trolling space and 3D printing threads.
 
2013-12-09 05:44:30 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: DerAppie: How about you make an educated guess about the chances of a collision being imminent between one object at the 10k point and another at the 100k point.

Uh, you think we know everything there is to know about science, bub?

"Modern science knows everything. We have a full and complete understanding of the universe and nothing will ever change! "

Is that what you're saying???? Hmmm? What if one piece of debris can like, teleport and shiat to another orbital plane?

What THEN Mr I Know All About Science????

/According to the DSM-V, I have to add a disclaimer about reading the above post in the appropriate tone of voice


Well, if the macroscopic matter would randomly teleport then we'd study it. We might get a nice way to get to Alpha Centauri and join Planet in the front of a Planetary Conscious, allowing us to live forever. Or until the local star and/or Planet blows up.
 
2013-12-09 06:14:35 PM  
Well since I'm bored in a meeting, lets pretend you're not a troll and actually address some of your points.

Quantum Apostrophe:
Show me some new physics, some new engineering at the scale required, some particle we overlooked, some chemical element that's missing from the periodic table, I'll change my mind.

Keep in mind that if our science is wrong, doesn't that mean the observations we make about space could be wrong as well? Like maybe it's even more hostile than we could have imagined?

But no, let me guess, THAT science is beyond question!


Nope. That's entirely within the realm of possibility. Space is already pretty faring hostile and I have no clue how we'd manage to do it now, let alone if it were even more hostile. I may not live to witness it, but I bet it would be cool to see if and how mankind will achieve it. (As a warning, I will be reusing this phrase a lot for reasons I hope you can understand)

Space is an endless continuation of Western post WWII society. But with rockets.

When you start invoking "yeah but we don't know everything" you invoke magic, faith, superstition and religion.

See, this is usually the used to address argument out of ignorance. We don't know what it is therefore it must be whatever. "We don't know what that unidentified flying object is, so there fore it MUST be aliens from another world," is a good example. All I'm saying is that we (I) don't know. Wouldn't it be cool to figure it out? I am not saying what the solution or explanation to these problems is or that one even exists. However there are a lot of smart people doing a whole lot of work in every field imaginable, not to mention developing whole new fields of understanding and study just for the hell of it. I may not live to witness it, but I bet it would be cool to see if and how mankind will achieve it.

Given what we DO know? Don't pack your bags for Mars just yet.

I've got nothing to contest here. It may be a good while. Although some people with access to quite a bit of capital may disagree.  I may not live to witness it, but I bet it would be cool to see if and how mankind will achieve it.

But all you need to show me is some crack in our understanding of physics at our scale.

That's all I ask for. Show it to me, don't just wish about it.


So you want me to show something I don't know exists? Show me that there is NO crack in our understanding of physics at our scale. I'm not saying there is or isn't one, but it does seem a bit pompous of you to assume with certainty that we have it all understood and correct.

If we DID suddenly find new methods of energy generation, wouldn't that mean the Earth ISN'T running out of resources? So why space?

Who said anything about running out of resources. We may discover a new method of energy generation that first gets used on earth and we then incorporate into space travel. It may also be possible that we develop some new energy source that isn't feasible for use on a planet. Yes, that is science fiction, but are you absolutely certain, with your almost religious fervor, that it is and will never be possible?

If we DID suddenly find magical new materials here on Earth, why do we need to mine asteroids again?

Who said anything about mining asteroids? And what if we find it magical new materials (to use your words), but not on Earth? Could we go mine them then?

If we DID have sci-fi asteroid mining robots, why wouldn't we just build and use those robots... right here?

Why are those two mutually exclusive? Why can't we don't both? Although again with the mining, what do you have a thing for minors?  (Yes, I know, bad joke)

That's another Space Nutter trademark: self-contradiction.

I'm sure it happens that someone's space fantacy isn't thought through or self-contradiciting or just plain stupid. But to discard with such certainty all possibility of mankind spreading into the stars, I can only blame the bastard who pees into your cereal every morning for making you so pessimistic and jaded.

You asked why space. I'll quote someone who has stated it better than I ever could, "Because it's what's next. Because we came out of the cave. We looked out over the hill and saw fire. And we crossed the ocean. And we pioneered the west. And we took to the sky. The history of man has hung on the timeline of exploration and this is what's next."

Yes, we have problems here on earth. There is poverty, starvation, war; but no one was left colder or hungrier because of Apollo. Many of the technologies we needed to develop and were developed specifically for space exploration were pretty quickly repurposed here on earth. You ask why should we explore space before we figure out how to expand our lifespans. Why can't we do both? Why does one preclude the other? Why can't the computers developed for advanced space flight also be used to run biological or chemical simulations? It sure as hell worked out that way before.

I may be naive and a hopeless optimist, but I think humanity has a lot left it can and will do. Things that even the most deranged writers of fiction and fantasy could never dream up in on their craziest days.  I may not live to witness it, but I bet it would be cool to see if and how mankind will achieve it.
 
2013-12-09 06:23:14 PM  
Dingleberry Dickwad:
//obviously not obscure

I had to google it. Loved those games.
 
2013-12-09 06:41:40 PM  
Problem solved

img.fark.net
 
2013-12-09 08:27:30 PM  
There's videos with more introduction that have been specifically posted on this potential disaster waiting to happen...

But basically, yeah, chain reactions in space are bad.

Check the video out and think Satelites instead of Mouse Traps...


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EKajmVgaOEM
 
2013-12-09 08:59:12 PM  
Quantum Apostrophe:

Not sure why everyone hates Quantum here.  I think he's right regarding space fantasies and actual living beings here on earth.
 
2013-12-09 09:26:21 PM  

Cortez the Killer: So, the movie Gravity, but in real life.

/Boring movie, IMO


That's what Gravity was loosely based on, but the movie suffered from no one involved in the project apparently having even heard of orbital mechanics, the sheer absurdity of the pin-perfect accuracy of the repeating scenario and the pants-on-head retardedness of thinking everything's in the same orbit to begin with makes the movie so laughably scientifically inaccurate that it's basically based entirely on the idea that there is a god and he's really sick of George Clooney's sappy bullshiat.

Which is I guess a high fantasy movie I can get behind, even if they had only one elf and they killed the party's dwarf in the first ten minutes.
 
2013-12-09 10:00:52 PM  
I have more important things to be aware of/concerned about.
 
2013-12-09 10:03:12 PM  
I'm working on a kerbal version of the Large Hadron Collider as we speak. It's currently about 40 EVA kerbals in opposing low EVE orbits... just waiting for magic to happen.

/Looking for the "Oh God! particle"
 
2013-12-09 11:30:34 PM  
I am far from an expert on this topic, but, why not build some sort of traps that would deflect the objects towards Earth?

Maybe a solar powered electromagnet that gently nudges ferrous items into an orbit doomed to hit the atmosphere?

Maybe some sort of gigantic blob of material that would trap the smaller objects. If it was large enough, the engineers on the ground could keep the good stuff from hitting it. Imagine a chunk of high density rubber the size of a bus. Now imagine that someone figured out how to make it pliable in the coldness of space to the point that the objects would penetrate, but not shatter the trap.
 
2013-12-09 11:57:00 PM  

jfarkinB: PsyLord: FTA: ...(imagine a screw traveling 20,000 miles an hour). That debris would then hit other objects in orbit

Aren't the other objects in orbit also traveling roughly the same speed?  The way they stated it in the article made it sound as though the screw is going to impact something that was not moving, so in essence a 20k mph hit.

Not necessarily. For starters, they could be traveling in the exact same orbit, but in the opposite direction. All the math works out the same, except that you get a closing speed of 40,000 mph. That would be unusual -- you generally launch into an orbit that lets you take advantage of the Earth's spin -- but not impossible. A more likely scenario is that one object was in something closer to a polar orbit, and the other something closer to equatorial...


 Remember the volumes involved -- unlike "Gravity".

Take every object that has ever been orbited by humankind and divide it up into screw-sized debris -- that's far beyond what we're talking about but will do for a maximum -- now remember that that debris is scattered randomly through a volume that is hundreds of thousands of times larger than the surface of the Pacific Ocean.  And nearly all of it is moving in the same orbital direction  -- very little, if any in retrograde orbit -- so the maximum velocity is from crossing orbits and nearly all polar debris will be in very different orbital altitudes from LEO (and essentially none at Geosynch altitudes)
 
2013-12-10 12:02:20 AM  

Quantum Apostrophe: cranked: Quantum Apostrophe: It's the people that think we'll colonize the universe.

We're in a thread about debris that is actually in orbit around our actual planet, put there by actual people using actual science.  The only one going on about 'colonizing the universe', as usual, is you.  While you occasionally make interesting (and obvious points) you immediately follow up with a straw man larger than can reasonably be created with any number of 3D printers and then thrash the hell out of it, all the while explaining to everyone else how stupid they sound.

Oh come on. You know as well as I do that about a half dozen Farkers pulled down their pants at "orbit", and 5 of those came at "objects", probably while still bent over from taking off their pants.

Debris in orbit around our planet at about 0.1 radii. Yippee yay, let me pack my suitcase for Mars.

And if my points were so obvious, you'd think they'd start sinking in by now.

Jeez, just the other day someone told me in all seriousness we aren't really exploring space because we aren't walking on the Moon.

This delusion about people in space is powerful stuff.

It fascinates me to no end.

But not as much as people with a lifespan measured in a handful of decades babbling on and on about the whole species and its future in space.... Usually by people so warped, depressed, misanthropic, self-loathing and un self-aware that they see no problem about not caring about the people alive today.

Sickness.


www.rigsofrods.com
 
2013-12-10 12:21:10 AM  
If we are serious about cleaning up space, we need to launch a rather large and robust spacecraft that might even require multiple refueling trips... It would catch up with debris and then "throw" it towards  the earth and let nature take its course while it moves on to the next piece of debris...  This shiat where you send a spacecraft up, latch on to debris, and then de-orbit both seems really really inefficient, expensive, and much more time consuming...
 
2013-12-10 05:40:08 AM  

Maul555: If we are serious about cleaning up space, we need to launch a rather large and robust spacecraft that might even require multiple refueling trips... It would catch up with debris and then "throw" it towards  the earth and let nature take its course while it moves on to the next piece of debris...  This shiat where you send a spacecraft up, latch on to debris, and then de-orbit both seems really really inefficient, expensive, and much more time consuming...


I think that if we are able to get ahold of the debris, we should hold onto it and bring it to a collection point where it can be processed and reused in space based manufacturing, or as shielding. It should be viewed as a resource.
 
2013-12-10 05:52:32 AM  

darkmayo: Kessler Syndrome!  (thanks Planetes for educating me of this years ago)


Yes... or what happened when Kerbalon 1 smashed into Kerbalon's 2 - 6. Parking orbits: how do they work?  farked if I know!

Planetes is also a great series, it does at least make some effort to be a little acurate about how moving around in space works.
 
2013-12-10 06:13:49 AM  

Dingleberry Dickwad: Quantum Apostrophe: Gaddiel: What, am I not agreeing with you? Modern science knows everything. We have a full and complete understanding of the universe and nothing will ever change! Previously held notions about physics have never been disproved or found to be false or incomplete. Never ever will someone figure out new methods of energy storage, energy generation, or locomotion, or how to manipulate relativity or some other ridiculous bit of science fiction nonsense. It's fixed, final, finito, fait. Right?

Show me some new physics, some new engineering at the scale required, some particle we overlooked, some chemical element that's missing from the periodic table, I'll change my mind.

So wait a minute, your logic is that "Because we don't know what we don't know, it doesn't exist so don't bother."? We don't know what it will take to stop aging either, should we stop bothering? We don't know what will safely and reliably stop cancer without causing serious issues to the patient, does that mean we stop looking?

You're either a troll or ... nah fark it, you're a troll because not even the politics tab rejects are that stupid.


I'm surprised at how many people don't have him on ignore. I've only put a handful of people into that limbo, but he's very deservedly one of them.
 
2013-12-10 06:41:59 PM  
Aren't most of these objects' orbits going to decay... eventually.
 
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