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(Philly.com)   Scientists discover there are huge reserves of fresh water under the rocks and stones at the bottom of the ocean, water flowing underground, which we could remove. You may ask yourself, how do I work this?   (philly.com) divider line 75
    More: Cool, Bottom of the Ocean, continental shelfs, fresh water, reverse osmosis, desalinations, Cubic kilometre, foreign exchange reserves, tides  
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2843 clicks; posted to Geek » on 08 Dec 2013 at 1:32 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-08 10:36:03 AM  
The problem is that extracting this fresh water is not an easy technical feat, and there's a very real chance of causing an uncontrollable catastrophe where the only thing anyone can do is ask themselves, 'My god, what have I done?'
 
2013-12-08 10:38:33 AM  
It's the kind of thing that only comes along once in a lifetime
 
2013-12-08 10:46:45 AM  
I can't wait to see what the talking heads at FOX news have to say about this.
 
2013-12-08 10:55:38 AM  
But how can we remove the water from the bottom of the ocean?
 
2013-12-08 11:15:35 AM  

MissFeasance: But how can we remove the water from the bottom of the ocean?


Really long bendy-straw.
 
2013-12-08 11:26:18 AM  
Rocks AND stones, subby?  Thanks for clearing that up.

Shostie: MissFeasance: But how can we remove the water from the bottom of the ocean?

Really long bendy-straw.


I drink your milkshake. I drink it up.
 
2013-12-08 11:29:36 AM  

SurfaceTension: Rocks AND stones, subby?  Thanks for clearing that up.


Now you've done it

/same as it ever was
 
2013-12-08 11:36:58 AM  

MissFeasance: But how can we remove the water from the bottom of the ocean?


i105.photobucket.com
Water dissolving, and water removing.
 
2013-12-08 11:37:37 AM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: SurfaceTension: Rocks AND stones, subby?  Thanks for clearing that up.

Now you've done it

/same as it ever was


Same as it EVER was!
 
2013-12-08 11:38:04 AM  
rocks RockLobster!! and stones
 
2013-12-08 11:41:32 AM  
I hear a twister comin'
Here comes the twister

i105.photobucket.com
 
2013-12-08 12:06:08 PM  
and the days go buy
 
2013-12-08 12:22:32 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Now you've done it


You may say to yourself, my god, what have I done?
 
2013-12-08 12:26:24 PM  
We need to find ways of poisoning this vast underground supply of fresh water.
 
2013-12-08 12:39:53 PM  
i236.photobucket.com
 
2013-12-08 12:43:46 PM  

toraque: The problem is that extracting this fresh water is not an easy technical feat, and there's a very real chance of causing an uncontrollable catastrophe where the only thing anyone can do is ask themselves, 'My god, what have I done?'


Stop Making Sense.
 
2013-12-08 12:57:39 PM  
We need to get it before it pollutes our salt water!
 
2013-12-08 01:17:11 PM  

Because People in power are Stupid: We need to find ways of poisoning this vast underground supply of fresh water.


Watch out, you might get what you're after.
 
2013-12-08 01:30:14 PM  

Because People in power are Stupid: We need to find ways of poisoning this vast underground supply of fresh water.


We are working on getting the fracking chemicals there as fast as we can.
 
2013-12-08 01:47:24 PM  
When I hear about scientists discovering weird stuff like this in seemingly out-of-the-way places, I ask myself, "well, how did it get here?"
 
2013-12-08 01:50:31 PM  
One tiny thing make this all this water worthless and unusable ...
 
2013-12-08 01:52:46 PM  

Uzzah: When I hear about scientists discovering weird stuff like this in seemingly out-of-the-way places, I ask myself, "well, how did it get here?"


Scientists discover a 'weird trick' to extract fresh water from the ocean
 
2013-12-08 01:56:45 PM  

Prophet of Loss: One tiny thing make this all this water worthless and unusable ...


It's in another part of the world?
 
2013-12-08 01:58:59 PM  
Sigh.

Same as it ever was.
 
2013-12-08 02:11:58 PM  
do they really think they can do this for less than the cost of a desalination plant?
 
2013-12-08 02:15:09 PM  
But in order to get to it we have to first tap all this oil under the ocean. Gosh, what a shame.

It won't be easy, but we just might be able to get some oil companies to heroically liberate this water for the good of the world.
 
2013-12-08 02:19:04 PM  

J. Frank Parnell: It won't be easy, but we just might be able to get some oil companies to heroically liberate this water for the good of the world.


And they'll be into the blue again, after the money's gone.
 
2013-12-08 02:25:50 PM  

Maul555: do they really think they can do this for less than the cost of a desalination plant?


...which they'll have to build anyway according to tfa, since this water has some salt but less than ocean water. I suppose the economic calculus is going to involve the difference in cost to remove a little bit of salt vs. the amount that's already present in sea water, the local water demand and possible economic benefit from using this water for agriculture in nearby dry places, whether or not this is fossil water and how fast it would be depleted, etc.

So it's there, but tfa doesn't really speak to whether using this resource makes any economic sense or not.

/Am I right? Or am I wrong?
 
2013-12-08 02:28:12 PM  
...er, the actual cost to treat this brackish water, I guess. Difference in cost to treat this stuff vs. sea water wouldn't really matter, after thinking about it for a few seconds.
 
2013-12-08 02:28:43 PM  

J. Frank Parnell: But in order to get to it we have to first tap all this oil under the ocean. Gosh, what a shame.

It won't be easy, but we just might be able to get some oil companies to heroically liberate this water for the good of the world.


Slippery people gonna help you out.
 
2013-12-08 02:28:58 PM  

SurfaceTension: Rocks AND stones, subby?  Thanks for clearing that up.


They're MINERALS, Marie!
Jesus, how many times do I have to tell you.
 
2013-12-08 02:32:30 PM  
However, the authors note that accessing the water could bring ethical and ecological difficulties. The most promising methods for extracting the water were developed for petroleum exploration. Not only that, but the water might need to undergo some desalinization through reverse osmosis.

So where's the ethical difficulty? Is it that they're going to use technology originally invented by the oil industry? Does that render the technology "evil" or "immoral"?
 
2013-12-08 02:32:51 PM  
Sounds like a road to nowhere.
 
2013-12-08 02:32:57 PM  

phaseolus: ...er, the actual cost to treat this brackish water, I guess. Difference in cost to treat this stuff vs. sea water wouldn't really matter, after thinking about it for a few seconds.


Maybe you think that distillation is the only desalination technique.
 
2013-12-08 02:37:51 PM  

Maul555: do they really think they can do this for less than the cost of a desalination plant?


Ma Nature already runs a low-cost thermonuclear-powered desalination plant...

~echo2.epfl.ch
 
2013-12-08 02:45:06 PM  

factmag-images.s3.amazonaws.com

Approves.
 
2013-12-08 02:46:25 PM  
Great. This will just encourage the Hollow Earth nutcases (many of whom hold that there are at least fresh water lakes down in the earth if not actual empty caves) and the religious whack jobs who use some version of hollow earth to explain where the water of Noah's flood came from and where it went afterwards - the "fountains of the great deep".
 
2013-12-08 02:48:33 PM  
*slow clap*
 
2013-12-08 02:54:48 PM  

HairBolus: Great. This will just encourage the Hollow Earth nutcases (many of whom hold that there are at least fresh water lakes down in the earth if not actual empty caves) and the religious whack jobs who use some version of hollow earth to explain where the water of Noah's flood came from and where it went afterwards - the "fountains of the great deep".


You think there are no caves deep underground?
 
2013-12-08 02:56:04 PM  
The solution is simple. Remove the water, carry the water. Remove the water from the bottom of the ocean.
 
2013-12-08 03:00:52 PM  

Maul555: HairBolus: Great. This will just encourage the Hollow Earth nutcases (many of whom hold that there are at least fresh water lakes down in the earth if not actual empty caves) and the religious whack jobs who use some version of hollow earth to explain where the water of Noah's flood came from and where it went afterwards - the "fountains of the great deep".

You think there are no caves deep underground?



It just occurs to me, there might be millions of caves above ground and we'd never even notice!
 
2013-12-08 03:01:12 PM  

Maul555: You think there are no caves deep underground?


Probably only believes in the ones occupied by hell. Because that isn't ridiculous at all.
 
2013-12-08 03:08:27 PM  

Stone Meadow: Maul555: do they really think they can do this for less than the cost of a desalination plant?

Ma Nature already runs a low-cost thermonuclear-powered desalination plant...

~[echo2.epfl.ch image 519x370]


But nuclear power is bad! Enjoy your cancer water! Read more about it at mother nature news
 
2013-12-08 03:09:00 PM  
How did I get here?
 
2013-12-08 03:16:06 PM  
However, the authors note that accessing the water could bring ethical and ecological difficulties. The most promising methods for extracting the water were developed for petroleum exploration. Not only that, but the water might need to undergo some desalinization through reverse osmosis.

Ethical?

Also, water sucked out of the ocean might need to be desalinated?
25.media.tumblr.com
/Then it's not really fresh water, is it?
 
2013-12-08 03:22:43 PM  
Saltless water, qu'est que c'est
 
2013-12-08 03:23:12 PM  

Because People in power are Stupid: We need to find ways of poisoning this vast underground supply of fresh water.


It's off the coast of New Jersey, you really thinks it's necessary to poison it?
 
2013-12-08 03:31:56 PM  

WelldeadLink: phaseolus: ...er, the actual cost to treat this brackish water, I guess. Difference in cost to treat this stuff vs. sea water wouldn't really matter, after thinking about it for a few seconds.

Maybe you think that distillation is the only desalination technique.



No. I'm aware of RO and I'm sure there are other methods I'm not aware of, I'm not a water treatment guy, I wasn't even considering technologies. I was amending my previous post where I was making a few guesses about the factors that would make this proposition economically viable, or not. After thinking it over I realized the *difference* in cost between treating sea water and treating this stuff wouldn't mean anything; what matters is how much it *actually* costs to purify this stuff.
 
2013-12-08 03:37:04 PM  

HairBolus: Great. This will just encourage the Hollow Earth nutcases (many of whom hold that there are at least fresh water lakes down in the earth if not actual empty caves) and the religious whack jobs who use some version of hollow earth to explain where the water of Noah's flood came from and where it went afterwards - the "fountains of the great deep".


I think it is the lair of the kuo toa.
 
2013-12-08 03:53:44 PM  
Sounds like a lot of trouble to get fresh water when you could just take me to the river.
 
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