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(BBC)   "Valleygirl speak" infection spreading fast among men in California   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 127
    More: Scary, University of Kent, Lancaster University, acoustical society of america  
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9566 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Dec 2013 at 12:37 PM (18 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-07 11:58:22 AM
wac.450f.edgecastcdn.net
 
2013-12-07 12:39:47 PM
That's what happens when you're raised by a single mom in California.
 
2013-12-07 12:41:42 PM

i369.photobucket.com

 
2013-12-07 12:41:47 PM
It so totally bugged me how the girls in Frozen kept slipping in some valley and I'm even from the valley :P
 
2013-12-07 12:41:57 PM

dv-ous: That's what happens when you're raised by a single mom in California?

FTFY?

 
2013-12-07 12:44:26 PM
In other news, California showing a sharp increase in fabulosity.
 
2013-12-07 12:44:31 PM
At the risk of sounding hopelessly clueless, where is the valley? Silicon Valley? San Fernando Valley? The valley of lost souls?
 
2013-12-07 12:46:52 PM
Gag me with a spoon!
 
2013-12-07 12:47:59 PM
This is what happens when you use intonation and affectations as a code that you are looking to achieve rapport with your interlocutors, rather than an explicit semantic signal.  It's the difference between gabbing around the water cooler and having a formal meeting.

I wish they would extend the study to see what correlations there are between these linguistic features and various psychological measurements (Meyers-Briggs, etc.).  My hypothesis is that uptalk is used more by introverts when they are seeking entry to a conversation or in a large group, but less when they are with close friends.
 
2013-12-07 12:48:07 PM
So if you read the article, when they say valley girl talk, they don't mean, like, oh my god, totally, gag me with a spoon. They mean uptalk, which the Aussies pioneered, where you end every sentence with a rising tone. (And which makes me want to strangle you, like, totally.)
 
2013-12-07 12:48:39 PM
Like, totally...

In other news, Blu-Ray sales of Clueless has inexplicably spiked.
 
2013-12-07 12:49:11 PM

Girl Sailor: At the risk of sounding hopelessly clueless, where is the valley? Silicon Valley? San Fernando Valley? The valley of lost souls?


San Fernando.  Which is, conveniently, also the valley of lost souls, since it's a suburban wasteland of the highest order.
 
2013-12-07 12:50:23 PM
They analyzed 23 whole people.

It's an epidemic! Run for the hills!
 
2013-12-07 12:50:25 PM
Eh. The uptalk has linguistic meaning (I'm a Valleygirl, yes you can tell, yes I've studied linguistics). When you raise the pitch at the end of a declarative sentence, you are signaling to the audience that you will continue talking. This prevents people from talking over each other when you need a slightly longer pause than what's considered "comfortable." When you finish, the final declarative sentence has the normal fall in pitch.
 
2013-12-07 12:52:41 PM
fark this? I'm moving to Antarctica before I catch this disease?
 
2013-12-07 12:53:22 PM
My boss would do this (end every sentence with rising tone) and it would drive me nuts.  He would combine that with looking into your eyes and tilting his head to one side.

He interacted with us the same way you'd talk to a five year old.  I wonder if he even realized he was doing it.
 
2013-12-07 12:53:30 PM
I really hate when people make statements, but make it sound like they are asking a question? I want to strangle you?  Plus,  I discredit everything you say?  Even if you are the smartest person in the room?
 
2013-12-07 12:53:44 PM

Peki: Eh. The uptalk has linguistic meaning (I'm a Valleygirl, yes you can tell, yes I've studied linguistics). When you raise the pitch at the end of a declarative sentence, you are signaling to the audience that you will continue talking. This prevents people from talking over each other when you need a slightly longer pause than what's considered "comfortable." When you finish, the final declarative sentence has the normal fall in pitch.


It also sounds terrible and makes the speaker appear unintelligent.

In my opinion.
 
2013-12-07 12:53:54 PM
"Valleygirl speak" infection spreading fast among homosexual men in California

/grody to the max
 
2013-12-07 12:54:25 PM
I attended a fairly technical talk last week where the presenter had this accent and repeatedly used the word "ginormous."  And that is all I remember about that presentation ... it was rather distracting.
 
2013-12-07 12:56:01 PM
Valleygirl speak?   Like, is this article from 20+ years ago? Like, I remember hearing about this stuff when I was a kid.
 
2013-12-07 12:56:38 PM

FrancoFile: This is what happens when you use intonation and affectations as a code that you are looking to achieve rapport with your interlocutors, rather than an explicit semantic signal.  It's the difference between gabbing around the water cooler and having a formal meeting.

I wish they would extend the study to see what correlations there are between these linguistic features and various psychological measurements (Meyers-Briggs, etc.).  My hypothesis is that uptalk is used more by introverts when they are seeking entry to a conversation or in a large group, but less when they are with close friends.


Achieving rapport, yes.  But a tool of introverts?  Going to have to disagree with you there.  Most of the uptalkers I know are all hardcore extroverts.
 
2013-12-07 12:57:14 PM
Soo '96. Has the author dude been in a cave for like ever?
 
2013-12-07 12:58:04 PM
"men"
 
2013-12-07 12:58:29 PM

OnyxOdin: Peki: Eh. The uptalk has linguistic meaning (I'm a Valleygirl, yes you can tell, yes I've studied linguistics). When you raise the pitch at the end of a declarative sentence, you are signaling to the audience that you will continue talking. This prevents people from talking over each other when you need a slightly longer pause than what's considered "comfortable." When you finish, the final declarative sentence has the normal fall in pitch.

It also sounds terrible and makes the speaker appear unintelligent.

In my opinion.


Same here. A rising inflection makes every sentence sound like a question.
 
2013-12-07 12:58:44 PM

Thurston Howell: FrancoFile: This is what happens when you use intonation and affectations as a code that you are looking to achieve rapport with your interlocutors, rather than an explicit semantic signal.  It's the difference between gabbing around the water cooler and having a formal meeting.

I wish they would extend the study to see what correlations there are between these linguistic features and various psychological measurements (Meyers-Briggs, etc.).  My hypothesis is that uptalk is used more by introverts when they are seeking entry to a conversation or in a large group, but less when they are with close friends.

Achieving rapport, yes.  But a tool of introverts?  Going to have to disagree with you there.  Most of the uptalkers I know are all hardcore extroverts.


Well that's why I want a study.  Do this with rigor (ie examine more than 23 people, for crying out loud) and let's find something out that's meaningful, instead of just doing a lame 'trend' story.
 
2013-12-07 12:59:18 PM

OnyxOdin: Peki: Eh. The uptalk has linguistic meaning (I'm a Valleygirl, yes you can tell, yes I've studied linguistics). When you raise the pitch at the end of a declarative sentence, you are signaling to the audience that you will continue talking. This prevents people from talking over each other when you need a slightly longer pause than what's considered "comfortable." When you finish, the final declarative sentence has the normal fall in pitch.

It also sounds terrible and makes the speaker appear unintelligent.

In my opinion.


Yup. But that's the nature of communication. Just because I intend to send you a message, doesn't mean you'll receive it.
 
2013-12-07 12:59:32 PM
In Canada, our Valley Talk just tacks an eh? on the end of every sentence.

The rise is on the eh?, eh?

In reality, young Californian males have been speaking Valley Girl for decades now. This end of the sentence rise is used by many young people everywhere since the original fad for Valley Girl spread in the 1980s.

It's not really linguistic news, eh?

Somebody's grad students just wrote a paper about it, eh?

In a similar fashion, the Canadian eh? is quite common in Michigan, although it has fewer uses, maybe 50 or 60 instead of 70 or 80.

They should drop the Girl and say Talk or Speak instead, because apart from those who were adults in the 1980s, a lot of people do it.

It is quite common for young females to have a different language from young males. As a rule, however, females are more conservative than males, and older people than young people. This may be true of Valley Girls, who may be preserving something local rather than innovating. However, in time the males may be swayed by the females and drop the accents they picked up from non-Valley teachers or at work and abroad.

Just a hypothesis you understand. I am no expert. I have studied some lingustics but not for a long time. It is a subject I find interesting and entertaining, along with language and rhetoric in general.
 
2013-12-07 01:00:47 PM
FrankZappa.jpg
 
2013-12-07 01:01:05 PM
It's weird...I live in the New York City area and noticed, regardless of gender or race, there are many people around here that talk like that "Like totally..." and end with the up-talk.

I don't mean someone transplanted from a different area/native residents and I've witnessed this for decades. Not everyone, but a significant number.

Perhaps TV has more influence than region...
 
2013-12-07 01:03:10 PM
mychinaconnection.com
 
2013-12-07 01:03:15 PM
*cues Frank Zappa's 'Valley Girl'*
 
2013-12-07 01:04:24 PM
Calvin Trillin described illustrated this, describing someone who, "introduced herself by asking us her name."
 
2013-12-07 01:05:59 PM

zvoidx: Perhaps TV has more influence than region...


Remember when we had regional TV?
Yeah, the eighties were great in a lot of ways.
 
2013-12-07 01:07:10 PM
Has anyone mentioned Zappa's "Valley Girl" yet?
 
2013-12-07 01:08:19 PM

Peki: Eh. The uptalk has linguistic meaning (I'm a Valleygirl, yes you can tell, yes I've studied linguistics). When you raise the pitch at the end of a declarative sentence, you are signaling to the audience that you will continue talking. This prevents people from talking over each other when you need a slightly longer pause than what's considered "comfortable." When you finish, the final declarative sentence has the normal fall in pitch.


i.chzbgr.com
 
2013-12-07 01:09:05 PM
Wanted for questioning:

img.fark.net
 
2013-12-07 01:09:27 PM

Sybarite: Gag me with a spoon!


I have not seen or heard that in forever. Like, totally.
 
2013-12-07 01:10:11 PM
Uptalk also happens in some decidedly hipper accents, like brit/euro/continental English, which is probably fueling this drive as much as anything else, think of all the brit actors people try to emulate, especially in Cali?
 
2013-12-07 01:14:02 PM

italie: Soo '96 1981. Has the author dude been in a cave for like ever?


Moon Unit Zappa fixed that for you.

/Late with the Zappa reference, I see
 
2013-12-07 01:15:33 PM
Hahahahaha BBC, No, No it isn't.

/ what did they do, talk to one hipster in Santa Barbera?
 
2013-12-07 01:15:34 PM
www.bodylovewellness.com
 
2013-12-07 01:16:22 PM
So far these responses are all totally lame to the max.
 
2013-12-07 01:18:46 PM
Awesome!
Radical!
Reaganomics!
 
TWX
2013-12-07 01:25:23 PM

FrancoFile: This is what happens when you use intonation and affectations as a code that you are looking to achieve rapport with your interlocutors, rather than an explicit semantic signal.  It's the difference between gabbing around the water cooler and having a formal meeting.

I wish they would extend the study to see what correlations there are between these linguistic features and various psychological measurements (Meyers-Briggs, etc.).  My hypothesis is that uptalk is used more by introverts when they are seeking entry to a conversation or in a large group, but less when they are with close friends.


It's much easier for someone that has learned proper speech to put-on low speech when circumstances necessitate it than it is for someone that learned low-speech to speak properly. Removing grammar and language curricula from our schools will only increase this fragmentation and increase socio-economic division, as generally those that manage and hire will have an immediate criteria on which to judge interviewees.

That said, there are circumstances when low-speech, either as the only manner that the speaker knows, or as an artificial affectation, can be of limited benefit. Since people judge other people by how they speak, one who is intelligent but speaks in this fashion can be conceal their intelligence in those few circumstances when that could benefit. Mind you, I don't think that there are many legitimate uses of this compared the the ability to use it for abuse, but the merits of the actions taken by the speaker are another matter.

BigLuca: I attended a fairly technical talk last week where the presenter had this accent and repeatedly used the word "ginormous."  And that is all I remember about that presentation ... it was rather distracting.


Heh. At least you don't have to regularly sit in meetings with a man who loudly chews on a toothpick while he speaks and continually interrupts his own sentences with, "uh," and other filler noises...
 
2013-12-07 01:27:27 PM
I was born and raised in Los Angeles and don't talk like that. My language is peppered with "dude" and "like" and even entire phrases like "the suckage was vast and infinite. totally" and the occasional "OH, CHAH!", but I have never in my life resorted to that weird rise at the end of a sentence that makes it sound like you're asking a question. That's just like one of the most totally annoying things ever. I don't notice people doing it very often, either. I don't know if it's because I'm used to it or if it's because it's not really too many more than those 23 dudes doing it.
 
2013-12-07 01:29:34 PM
One bell, you are German. Two bells, still German. Three bells, Valley Girl.
 
2013-12-07 01:29:44 PM

TakoNeko: Wanted for questioning:

[img.fark.net image 400x300]



Deborah Foreman wanted for more than questioning, by me anyway.

/also of My Chauffeur and April Fool's Day, for those who don't remember the 80s
 
2013-12-07 01:32:03 PM

Real Women Drink Akvavit: I was born and raised in Los Angeles and don't talk like that. My language is peppered with "dude" and "like" and even entire phrases like "the suckage was vast and infinite. totally" and the occasional "OH, CHAH!", but I have never in my life resorted to that weird rise at the end of a sentence that makes it sound like you're asking a question. That's just like one of the most totally annoying things ever. I don't notice people doing it very often, either. I don't know if it's because I'm used to it or if it's because it's not really too many more than those 23 dudes doing it.


"Strange things are a-foot at the Circle K"
 
2013-12-07 01:35:55 PM

Prevailing Wind: fark this? I'm moving to Antarctica before I catch this disease?


You can only catch it if you have sexual relations. So don't have sex and you will be fine.
 
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