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(National Geographic)   Are there cheeses worse than 'human cheese'? Someone took the time to answer that question seriously, with horrifying results   (news.nationalgeographic.com) divider line 73
    More: Followup, Italian Islands  
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9340 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Dec 2013 at 9:20 AM (40 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-07 01:00:57 AM
Story has nothing to do with breast milk.

\ I am disappoint.
 
2013-12-07 01:10:12 AM
Lancre Blue
 
2013-12-07 09:23:59 AM
Smegma, I guess it sorta counts as human cheese.
 
2013-12-07 09:24:55 AM
Cheese can be made from many sources, including the bacteria of your belly button.

I stopped reading RIGHT there
 
2013-12-07 09:27:16 AM
Are there cheeses worse than 'human cheese'?

Oh, you betcha.

Derived from Pecorino, casu marzu goes beyond typical fermentation to a stage most would consider decomposition, brought about by the digestive action of the larvae of the cheese fly Piophila casei. These larvae are deliberately introduced to the cheese, promoting an advanced level of fermentation and breaking down of the cheese's fats. The texture of the cheese becomes very soft, with some liquid (called lagrima, from Sardinian language for "tear") seeping out. The larvae themselves appear as translucent white worms, about 8 millimetres (0.3 in) long.[1] When disturbed, the larvae can launch themselves for distances up to 15 centimetres (6 in). Some people clear the larvae from the cheese before consuming while others do not. The cheese, along with one of its Sardinian makers, Giovanni Gabbas, received attention on Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern. Zimmern described the taste of the cheese as "so ammoniated" that "...it scorches your tongue a bit." The cheese is known to leave an aftertaste for a duration of up to several hours.[2]
 
2013-12-07 09:28:37 AM

DrunkBastard: Story has nothing to do with breast milk.

\ I am disappoint.


Huh? It's like the first one listed.
 
2013-12-07 09:33:46 AM

NutWrench: Are there cheeses worse than 'human cheese'?

Oh, you betcha.

Derived from Pecorino, casu marzu goes beyond typical fermentation to a stage most would consider decomposition, brought about by the digestive action of the larvae of the cheese fly Piophila casei. These larvae are deliberately introduced to the cheese, promoting an advanced level of fermentation and breaking down of the cheese's fats. The texture of the cheese becomes very soft, with some liquid (called lagrima, from Sardinian language for "tear") seeping out. The larvae themselves appear as translucent white worms, about 8 millimetres (0.3 in) long.[1] When disturbed, the larvae can launch themselves for distances up to 15 centimetres (6 in). Some people clear the larvae from the cheese before consuming while others do not. The cheese, along with one of its Sardinian makers, Giovanni Gabbas, received attention on Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern. Zimmern described the taste of the cheese as "so ammoniated" that "...it scorches your tongue a bit." The cheese is known to leave an aftertaste for a duration of up to several hours.[2]


Also mentioned in the article.
 
2013-12-07 09:34:44 AM
checks for maggot cheese - yep.
 
2013-12-07 09:36:53 AM

BumpInTheNight: Smegma, I guess it sorta counts as human cheese.


No can haz on license plate
Smegma, that is...
 
2013-12-07 09:37:39 AM

DrunkBastard: Story has nothing to do with breast milk.

\ I am disappoint.


you know how I know you DNRTFA?
 
2013-12-07 09:37:55 AM

NutWrench: Are there cheeses worse than 'human cheese'?

Oh, you betcha.

Derived from Pecorino, casu marzu goes beyond typical fermentation to a stage most would consider decomposition, brought about by the digestive action of the larvae of the cheese fly Piophila casei. These larvae are deliberately introduced to the cheese, promoting an advanced level of fermentation and breaking down of the cheese's fats. The texture of the cheese becomes very soft, with some liquid (called lagrima, from Sardinian language for "tear") seeping out. The larvae themselves appear as translucent white worms, about 8 millimetres (0.3 in) long.[1] When disturbed, the larvae can launch themselves for distances up to 15 centimetres (6 in). Some people clear the larvae from the cheese before consuming while others do not. The cheese, along with one of its Sardinian makers, Giovanni Gabbas, received attention on Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern. Zimmern described the taste of the cheese as "so ammoniated" that "...it scorches your tongue a bit." The cheese is known to leave an aftertaste for a duration of up to several hours.[2]


I love Sardinia, but I just couldn't do this one.  Guess I'm a wimp or something.
 
2013-12-07 09:38:00 AM
What about fumunda cheese?
 
2013-12-07 09:38:29 AM
Wonder if they made cheese from the bacteria that makes some feet smell like corn chips. That would be and unexpected smell for a cheese.
 
2013-12-07 09:48:49 AM

DrunkBastard: Story has nothing to do with breast milk.

\ I am disappoint.


That's the only thing that would make it human cheese, unless we are talking about sebaceous secretions, feh.
 
2013-12-07 09:48:57 AM
Vegan-Cannibal Cheese?

No thanks.

Whizz-Cheese?
 
2013-12-07 09:51:09 AM

NutWrench: ... The larvae themselves appear as translucent white worms, about 8 millimetres (0.3 in) long.[1] When disturbed, the larvae can launch themselves for distances up to 15 centimetres (6 in).


www.funelf.net
 
2013-12-07 09:51:18 AM
I was hungry, reading this article is like going on a diet.
 
2013-12-07 09:51:49 AM

WTFDYW: Cheese can be made from many sources, including the bacteria of your belly button.

I stopped reading RIGHT there


Here's where we differ. After reading that I swabbed the inside of my belly-button with an index finger and then gave it a whiff while pretending to smell cheese... just to see if I would find it appetizing.

I did not.
 
2013-12-07 09:55:52 AM
I'm sure it has nothing on the cheeses from the article, but I remember one time at a picnic a friend brought the most godawfully stinky cheese in the world, and yet taste-wise it was pretty good on bread. Go figure.

We tried to figure out what cheese it was, but the label had literally dissolved. We figured that was a function of extreme cheese stank.
/ extreme cheese stank is my next band name.
 
2013-12-07 10:00:08 AM

maxheck: I'm sure it has nothing on the cheeses from the article, but I remember one time at a picnic a friend brought the most godawfully stinky cheese in the world, and yet taste-wise it was pretty good on bread. Go figure.

We tried to figure out what cheese it was, but the label had literally dissolved. We figured that was a function of extreme cheese stank.
/ extreme cheese stank is my next band name.


There's a specialty cheese store near my house that has all sorts of blue cheese and Roquefort stuff. And then in the corner of the display case there's a cheese inside of a special air-tight container. In passing, all I saw the that it was labeled "Really 'stinky' cheese"which is far from an official name. It wasn't until I left the store that I thought to myself, "Wait, what?" Now I want to go back and see what's up with it.
 
2013-12-07 10:00:28 AM

sbchamp: BumpInTheNight: Smegma, I guess it sorta counts as human cheese.

No can haz on license plate
Smegma, that is...


Just be glad those kill-joy troglodytes at the DMV don't run the maternity wards.
 
2013-12-07 10:00:31 AM
Nope.  Nuh-uh.
 
2013-12-07 10:00:55 AM
You know, I have always figured that if it was a mainpage link, it was probably worth a click if I had the time.  Yet here we are.

And there is no way in hell I am reading these comments, either.  I am not going to let y'all ruin my enjoyment of cheese
 
2013-12-07 10:04:26 AM
"Breast milk cheese is vegan-friendly"

How?
 
2013-12-07 10:10:44 AM

dennysgod: "Breast milk cheese is vegan-friendly"

How?


My guess is because it comes from yourself and not another animal that couldn't consent to it, maybe?
 
2013-12-07 10:12:08 AM

WinoRhino: dennysgod: "Breast milk cheese is vegan-friendly"

How?

My guess is because it comes from yourself and not another animal that couldn't consent to it, maybe?


People are corporations, but corporations aren't mammals, maybe?
 
2013-12-07 10:22:13 AM

dennysgod: "Breast milk cheese is vegan-friendly"

How?


My question exactly. It is still a mammal product.
 
2013-12-07 10:26:43 AM
WinoRhino:

maxheck: I'm sure it has nothing on the cheeses from the article, but I remember one time at a picnic a friend brought the most godawfully stinky cheese in the world, and yet taste-wise it was pretty good on bread. Go figure.

We tried to figure out what cheese it was, but the label had literally dissolved. We figured that was a function of extreme cheese stank.
/ extreme cheese stank is my next band name.

There's a specialty cheese store near my house that has all sorts of blue cheese and Roquefort stuff. And then in the corner of the display case there's a cheese inside of a special air-tight container. In passing, all I saw the that it was labeled "Really 'stinky' cheese"which is far from an official name. It wasn't until I left the store that I thought to myself, "Wait, what?" Now I want to go back and see what's up with it.


One of the funniest things you see in SE Asia is the "No Durian Fruit" signs. The one that really cracked me up was on etched on the glass doors of a swanky hotel, probably at the cost of hundreds of dollars. Evidently it's that bad.
 
2013-12-07 10:28:20 AM
I wonder what was going through the head of the first person to eat maggot cheese. I mean besides the maggots.
 
2013-12-07 10:32:02 AM
How about any of the following:

1.  The cheese that forms on the taint.

2.  The cheese that forms where the nutsack meets the leg.

3.  The cheese that forms in the crack of one's ass.
 
2013-12-07 10:35:42 AM
Dick cheese?
 
2013-12-07 10:39:42 AM
Pre-made old lady?

oddlovescompany.com
 
2013-12-07 10:47:31 AM

maxheck: One of the funniest things you see in SE Asia is the "No Durian Fruit" signs. The one that really cracked me up was on etched on the glass doors of a swanky hotel, probably at the cost of hundreds of dollars. Evidently it's that bad.


No surprise there. The best description that I have heard of durian is that it's like cheesecake that's been marinated in an unflushed toilet.
 
2013-12-07 11:01:12 AM

maxheck: / extreme cheese stank is my next band name.

I think that was on Hoobastank's shortlist of band names, but extreme cheese stank was too long.
 
2013-12-07 11:01:45 AM
The hopeless imp:

I wonder what was going through the head of the first person to eat maggot cheese. I mean besides the maggots.

I'm amazed that people pay big money to eat lobster. It's a friggin crustacean!
 
Ant
2013-12-07 11:02:01 AM
I think Stilton is about as stinky as I can tolerate. It tastes good though.
 
2013-12-07 11:08:42 AM
still waiting for pig milk cheese.
 
2013-12-07 11:09:41 AM
Gordon Bennett:

maxheck: One of the funniest things you see in SE Asia is the "No Durian Fruit" signs. The one that really cracked me up was on etched on the glass doors of a swanky hotel, probably at the cost of hundreds of dollars. Evidently it's that bad.

No surprise there. The best description that I have heard of durian is that it's like cheesecake that's been marinated in an unflushed toilet.


Well, to be fair, in the west we make signs re: say, smoking and a lot of people would describe such the same, except without the cheesecake.

But you don't normally think of things like "Don't bring your stinky-ass produce into the lobby."
 
2013-12-07 11:10:30 AM

Endive Wombat: What about fumunda cheese?


Came to post this. . . I see my work is done here.

/Leaving satisfied.
 
2013-12-07 11:24:04 AM

Lee451: dennysgod: "Breast milk cheese is vegan-friendly"

How?

My question exactly. It is still a mammal product.


As has been stated, it comes from people. people that have consented to thier... product being used. I wont pretend to speak for the vegan as I am not one of them, but as I understand it, many feel that any use of animal byproducts is exploitive. even though eggs are poultry periods and are cast off, you are still exploiting the chicken, no honey, that exploits the bee's, no alcohol or vinegar, that exploits the yeast.

using your OWN milk, bacteria, and yeast to make cheese would be okay though.
 
2013-12-07 11:24:25 AM
Venezuelan beaver cheese?
 
2013-12-07 11:33:36 AM

Cerebral Knievel: Lee451: dennysgod: "Breast milk cheese is vegan-friendly"

How?

My question exactly. It is still a mammal product.

As has been stated, it comes from people. people that have consented to thier... product being used. I wont pretend to speak for the vegan as I am not one of them, but as I understand it, many feel that any use of animal byproducts is exploitive. even though eggs are poultry periods and are cast off, you are still exploiting the chicken, no honey, that exploits the bee's, no alcohol or vinegar, that exploits the yeast.

using your OWN milk, bacteria, and yeast to make cheese would be okay though.


Vegans don't care about yeast, as it's a fungi, so alcohol and vinegar are fine (as long as other animal products aren't used in their production). Just FYI.
 
2013-12-07 11:36:19 AM

Gordon Bennett: maxheck: One of the funniest things you see in SE Asia is the "No Durian Fruit" signs. The one that really cracked me up was on etched on the glass doors of a swanky hotel, probably at the cost of hundreds of dollars. Evidently it's that bad.

No surprise there. The best description that I have heard of durian is that it's like cheesecake that's been marinated in an unflushed toilet.


Ever smelled "stinky tofu"? Common in taiwan, probably China too.

Smells like deep-fried chicken poo, but supposedly it's vegetarian.
 
2013-12-07 11:55:48 AM
i remember the String-Cheese incident was pretty rotten.

upload.wikimedia.org

/wait
//what metaphor am i mixing again
 
2013-12-07 11:58:04 AM

BumpInTheNight: Smegma, I guess it sorta counts as human cheese.


Hey! Who's up for some cheesy crust pizza?
 
2013-12-07 11:59:17 AM
I thought I was pretty tough until I bought some Limburger cheese. The first bite was ok, as I didn't breathe through my nose. But once I got a good wiff of it I couldn't unsmell it. Damn I hate that stuff.
 
2013-12-07 12:15:36 PM

Day_Old_Dutchie: Venezuelan beaver cheese?


paired with a
Finca Antigua Moscate
 
2013-12-07 12:29:48 PM

Your Hind Brain: Dick cheese?



Came to the comments just for this.
 
2013-12-07 12:44:30 PM
sbchamp 2013-12-07 09:36:53 AM

BumpInTheNight: Smegma, I guess it sorta counts as human cheese.

No can haz on license plate
Smegma, that is...


Actually, back in 1987, I saw a car in Maine with that very license plate. I almost drove off the road laughing so hard as I couldn't believe they let him get that plate. Once you saw the driver, the plate just seemed appropriate.
 
2013-12-07 12:45:19 PM

Cerebral Knievel: Lee451: dennysgod: "Breast milk cheese is vegan-friendly"

How?

My question exactly. It is still a mammal product.

As has been stated, it comes from people. people that have consented to thier... product being used. I wont pretend to speak for the vegan as I am not one of them, but as I understand it, many feel that any use of animal byproducts is exploitive. even though eggs are poultry periods and are cast off, you are still exploiting the chicken, no honey, that exploits the bee's, no alcohol or vinegar, that exploits the yeast.

using your OWN milk, bacteria, and yeast to make cheese would be okay though.


That's it. I'd bet that a larger number of vegans than the rest of us wouldn't drink human milk, but that's the ick factor, not for ethical reasons.

The rest of your comment is a little misleading, though. Even though eggs from the store will never be fertilized, eating eggs supports a system where male chicks are killed, so folks who are vegans for ethical reasons are entirely justified in avoiding them. (With the exception of a few places, as I understand it.) Honey is an animal product, you're entirely right, and the vegans I know avoid it. And yeast aren't animals at all.
 
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