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(Space.com)   What would a Mars colony look like? With KSP looking base. Post your KSP version to the right   (space.com) divider line 233
    More: Interesting, Martians, life on Mars, martian soil, space radiation, manned mission to Mars, Red Planet, ice crystals  
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3541 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Dec 2013 at 10:00 AM (45 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-05 12:10:46 PM  
There is a staggering amount of mineral wealth in the asteroid belt and yet somehow QA thinks we won't find a way to exploit it.  I'm assuming that he doesn't really understand humanity and greed all that much.
 
2013-12-05 12:10:49 PM  

mr lawson: You very well might get the opportunity to directly help to fund it in exchange for a one time orbital trip around the Earth. Fair?


So you think that space tourism is going to fund a trip to Mars and beyond. Hm. Well...good luck.
 
2013-12-05 12:12:22 PM  

Khellendros: Seriously, though - this thread is one of your more thoroughly insane efforts. It's really a work of art.


Oh I know. Completely insane. Pointing out that we're limited to actual materials and real engineering.

Clearly, I just need to believe harder. Not a religion at all.

So, we're alone in the universe? We're the only ones who are going to figure out how to travel among the stars?

How special for us!

Here I was thinking we're just one among countless stars separated by vast gulfs of deadly nothing.

Instead, I now realize the universe is a mall-sized artifact full of like, stuff, man, for us to plunder!

Pack the bags honey, they've put a big rubber band on a tree! We're going to Mars! Yeehaw!!!!
 
2013-12-05 12:13:04 PM  

Lando Lincoln: mr lawson: You very well might get the opportunity to directly help to fund it in exchange for a one time orbital trip around the Earth. Fair?

So you think that space tourism is going to fund a trip to Mars and beyond. Hm. Well...good luck.


Duh, obviously. People go diving, therefore we will colonize the ocean floor.

Why are you such a Luddite?
 
2013-12-05 12:17:17 PM  
This thread makes me want to buy Starbound.
 
2013-12-05 12:17:53 PM  

Lando Lincoln: So you think that space tourism is going to fund a trip to Mars and beyond. Hm. Well...good luck.


In it's entirety? Absolutely not! The purpose of "tourism" plan would be two fold. First, help defray cost of initial R&D and secondly, build goodwill with a large base of people who will not qualify to be part of the continual space operations (plus it will be a hell of a recruitment tool).
 
2013-12-05 12:19:11 PM  

the money is in the banana stand: Resources are limited.
Space is limited.
There are tons of man-made and natural factors that would lead to our extinction.


Wow, such caring and passion for the species.

Egoy3k: There is a staggering amount of mineral wealth in the asteroid belt and yet somehow QA thinks we won't find a way to exploit it.  I'm assuming that he doesn't really understand humanity and greed all that much.


That's right. There's staggering mineral wealth dissolved in the ocean too. And?

I suspect you don't understand technology that well. You're a software engineer, or an economist perhaps?

We don't really get rid of the minerals we use here, Sparky. They're all still here, concentrated by previous mining into garbage dumps.

Human greed powered by reality will exploit that resource.

It costs too much to put poor brown people into space suits to go play Miner 2049er in space.

If we had automated space mining, we could do it here for far cheaper.

No one's going to mine asteroids. Perhaps some addle-brained bored billionaire will maybe get a spoon made from an asteroid because he could. Once. But that's it.

You don't really believe what you're saying, do you?

I think you're a dewy-eyed optimistic doofus.
 
2013-12-05 12:19:14 PM  
I didn't know you were a singer and songwriter, QA!
 
2013-12-05 12:19:42 PM  
cloud-3.steampowered.com
 
2013-12-05 12:21:36 PM  

mr lawson: Lando Lincoln: So you think that space tourism is going to fund a trip to Mars and beyond. Hm. Well...good luck.

In it's entirety? Absolutely not! The purpose of "tourism" plan would be two fold. First, help defray cost of initial R&D and secondly, build goodwill with a large base of people who will not qualify to be part of the continual space operations (plus it will be a hell of a recruitment tool).


We don't even have supersonic passenger transport right here where everything is. Once the novelty wears off, why do you see people caring about space?

They were already bored by Apollo 12.

Get real. Give me your money, at least you'll have helped a real person with real problems. Not played Grown Up LEGOs.
 
2013-12-05 12:22:13 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: If we had automated space mining, we could do it here for far cheaper.

No one's going to mine asteroids. Perhaps some addle-brained bored billionaire will maybe get a spoon made from an asteroid because he could. Once. But that's it.


you realize you just described Planetary Resources, right?
 
2013-12-05 12:22:40 PM  
When playing Kerbal space program you build something symmetrical.  If it falls apart during ascent, you add more struts, if it fails to make orbit, you add more boosters
 
2013-12-05 12:22:49 PM  

RedPhoenix122: the money is in the banana stand: For just those reasons alone, it is a good idea to invest in expanding our options and colonizing new planets (at the very least harvesting). If Earth goes away, then we still have other civilizations. It does not make sense however to disregard the cost and to try to progress faster than technology currently allows. The thing with research and development however with concerns to space exploration is that we learn a lot of cool shiat that improves conditions here in the process. This is completely outside of the deeper reasons of exploring the meaning of our existence, environment, and life in general. I find that we typically learn the most through trial and error, mistake, and pushing the boundaries. This is where breakthroughs come from that speed up our progress significantly. There really isn't much you can lose in this endeavor. The fact that it isn't more of a priority tells me that people are just myopic.

Not to mentioned the technology developed during this process could be adapted for things that we use every day.


Now you've done it. Don't you know that any technology that spun off from the space program would have been created eventually in some other way anyways? Geesh. You can't just mix your tech around, it has to have a single purpose and never be used or adapted for anything else. And you can never learn more about a given science unless it's in the field of medicine.
 
2013-12-05 12:23:16 PM  

Egoy3k: RedPhoenix122: I would, but I can't seem to do anything but shoot into orbit around the sun and run out of fuel.

My standard Kerbal mission ends with my crew orbiting the earth with no fuel. For some reason I'm just burning too much fuel on my launch.


When I was having similar issues it was due to me pushing up against terminal velocity while in the atmosphere.
 
2013-12-05 12:23:30 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Get real. Give me your money,


Give give me nothing I value in return. Why would I?
 
2013-12-05 12:24:12 PM  

RedPhoenix122: Not to mentioned the technology developed during this process could be adapted for things that we use every day.


Or we could just bypass the middleman and give money directly to scientists and engineers. But no no, it's important to have a middleman.
 
2013-12-05 12:24:44 PM  
OK, so I finally looked up that launch loop thing, and from what I can tell, there are two major hurdles for this idea:  Statics and logistics.

Statics:  Small scale models of this idea will have far different physics when built full scale
Logistics.  2000km is a lot of real estate....expensive to maintain.
 
2013-12-05 12:26:03 PM  

mr lawson: Quantum Apostrophe: Get real. Give me your money,

Give give me nothing I value in return. Why would I?


Help your fellow human. I'm part of the species. I could be someone that like invents something totally important but now you'll never know.

That's the usual argument for plowing billions into space fantasies, yes? But it doesn't apply to individuals?
 
2013-12-05 12:26:27 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: mr lawson: Lando Lincoln: So you think that space tourism is going to fund a trip to Mars and beyond. Hm. Well...good luck.

In it's entirety? Absolutely not! The purpose of "tourism" plan would be two fold. First, help defray cost of initial R&D and secondly, build goodwill with a large base of people who will not qualify to be part of the continual space operations (plus it will be a hell of a recruitment tool).

We don't even have supersonic passenger transport right here where everything is. Once the novelty wears off, why do you see people caring about space?

They were already bored by Apollo 12.

Get real. Give me your money, at least you'll have helped a real person with real problems. Not played Grown Up LEGOs.


So you think we are at our technological maximum right now? Oh wow...
 
2013-12-05 12:27:37 PM  

A Cave Geek: OK, so I finally looked up that launch loop thing, and from what I can tell, there are two major hurdles for this idea:  Statics and logistics.

Statics:  Small scale models of this idea will have far different physics when built full scale
Logistics.  2000km is a lot of real estate....expensive to maintain.


Never gonna happen. It's just one of those "promised land" things like religions have.
 
2013-12-05 12:27:46 PM  

The Grim Sleeper: Egoy3k: RedPhoenix122: I would, but I can't seem to do anything but shoot into orbit around the sun and run out of fuel.

My standard Kerbal mission ends with my crew orbiting the earth with no fuel. For some reason I'm just burning too much fuel on my launch.

One thing I've started doing is putting four large liquid fuel engines/fuel tanks on a rocket (which gets my ships to about 25K meters in altitude) then another booster, then another engine on the capsule. One trick I've found is to throttle back on the liquid engines and your rocket after engines cut out will still gain altitude, so I usually let it ride for another 5K meters or more before staging the next booster, if that make sense. I'm sure I'm doing something wrong still. Fun game, though. What I don't like is the decouplers fail very easily seems like.


Use struts between sections to reinforce the structure.
 
2013-12-05 12:28:55 PM  

machoprogrammer: Quantum Apostrophe: mr lawson: Lando Lincoln: So you think that space tourism is going to fund a trip to Mars and beyond. Hm. Well...good luck.

In it's entirety? Absolutely not! The purpose of "tourism" plan would be two fold. First, help defray cost of initial R&D and secondly, build goodwill with a large base of people who will not qualify to be part of the continual space operations (plus it will be a hell of a recruitment tool).

We don't even have supersonic passenger transport right here where everything is. Once the novelty wears off, why do you see people caring about space?

They were already bored by Apollo 12.

Get real. Give me your money, at least you'll have helped a real person with real problems. Not played Grown Up LEGOs.

So you think we are at our technological maximum right now? Oh wow...


Um, have you seen many real changes and breakthroughs in the last 30 years? We're still coasting on physics from the 1920s mostly.

I would really like to know why and how you believe the things you do.
 
2013-12-05 12:29:02 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: We don't even have supersonic passenger transport right here where everything is. Once the novelty wears off, why do you see people caring about space?


some on Earth always will.
But you are right in one aspect, novelty.
There will be quite of few people who experience it once or even after a few years and will want to go back to Earth (churn rate).

But those who stay for their own reasons (maybe they want to get away from Earth society, maybe they want medical treatment not available on Earth due to restrictions, maybe they are life-long adventures...hundreds of reasons), They are the people I am looking for.
 
2013-12-05 12:31:47 PM  

mr lawson: Quantum Apostrophe: We don't even have supersonic passenger transport right here where everything is. Once the novelty wears off, why do you see people caring about space?

some on Earth always will.
But you are right in one aspect, novelty.
There will be quite of few people who experience it once or even after a few years and will want to go back to Earth (churn rate).

But those who stay for their own reasons (maybe they want to get away from Earth society, maybe they want medical treatment not available on Earth due to restrictions, maybe they are life-long adventures...hundreds of reasons), They are the people I am looking for.


Wow, you're barely hanging on to reality, aren't you? You better have a "non compos mentis" clause somewhere in your will.
 
2013-12-05 12:31:50 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Help your fellow human. I'm part of the species. I could be someone that like invents something totally important but now you'll never know.

That's the usual argument for plowing billions into space fantasies, yes? But it doesn't apply to individuals?


I care not about individual plights. I care not for the society Earth has adopted. I care only for the survival and sustainability of the species as a whole.
 
2013-12-05 12:33:16 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: And physics. You know, technology isn't this magical thing that people just wish into existence. Have you noticed that a 747 from 1969 pretty much looks and acts like one from 2013? Yes yes, you have in-flight videos but that's not why you're paying to sit in the thing, right?



Aside from being lighter, able to carry heavier loads, having greater range, and using less fuel?

Have you noticed that the ion-drive space probes from 1969 look nothing like the ion-drive space probes from 2013?
 
2013-12-05 12:34:23 PM  

mr lawson: Quantum Apostrophe: Help your fellow human. I'm part of the species. I could be someone that like invents something totally important but now you'll never know.

That's the usual argument for plowing billions into space fantasies, yes? But it doesn't apply to individuals?

I care not about individual plights. I care not for the society Earth has adopted. I care only for the survival and sustainability of the species as a whole.


Yeah, that's not a mental breakdown waiting to happen. You only care about your novelties in your bleak, dreadful and misanthropic existence.

Why are you Space Nutters so easy to unmask as total loons?
 
2013-12-05 12:35:20 PM  

croesius: Noted.


I know, I was trying an experiment to see if he'd jump on that since it seems to be the hot topic I've noticed him in the most. Experiment failed. C'est la vie.
 
2013-12-05 12:35:31 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: machoprogrammer: Quantum Apostrophe: mr lawson: Lando Lincoln: So you think that space tourism is going to fund a trip to Mars and beyond. Hm. Well...good luck.

In it's entirety? Absolutely not! The purpose of "tourism" plan would be two fold. First, help defray cost of initial R&D and secondly, build goodwill with a large base of people who will not qualify to be part of the continual space operations (plus it will be a hell of a recruitment tool).

We don't even have supersonic passenger transport right here where everything is. Once the novelty wears off, why do you see people caring about space?

They were already bored by Apollo 12.

Get real. Give me your money, at least you'll have helped a real person with real problems. Not played Grown Up LEGOs.

So you think we are at our technological maximum right now? Oh wow...

Um, have you seen many real changes and breakthroughs in the last 30 years? We're still coasting on physics from the 1920s mostly.

I would really like to know why and how you believe the things you do.


You're more than welcome to go live with only the tech we had 30 years ago. That would at least spare us your idiocy. Make sure you also tell the doctor that any evaluation and treatment for whatever you're visiting him/her must be done only with what was available to them 30 years ago as well.
 
2013-12-05 12:36:39 PM  
I don't have a Duna base yet, but here is my latest rover mission to Mun.


http://imgur.com/a/FiBjS

Note: Contains a spoiler. If you don't want to see an easter egg avoid the end.
 
2013-12-05 12:40:20 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: bleak, dreadful and misanthropic existence.


I see no bleak, dreadful and misanthropic future. Only hope and happiness as mankind fully reaches its true potential for greatness as we cast off these fears and doubts of the unknown and unleash the the true loving power of humanity.
 
2013-12-05 12:42:57 PM  

Dingleberry Dickwad: You're more than welcome to go live with only the tech we had 30 years ago. That would at least spare us your idiocy. Make sure you also tell the doctor that any evaluation and treatment for whatever you're visiting him/her must be done only with what was available to them 30 years ago as well.


Yet none of those things are what's required to enable the insane Space Nutter ideas. Glad to see we agree. 30 years ago we already had computers everywhere, cars and planes did the same thing, houses and food and clothes were the same.

None of the changes from the last 30 years point to better propulsion on the scale to match the size of space. We're still going to LEO and GEO, we're still sending (better) tin cans to take (better) pictures of remote dead rocks.

The basic principles haven't changed in 30 years, and there is nothing to indicate we've missed some huge chunk of physics or chemistry.

I don't know how to put it plainer. You're conflating things that don't compare and think you're clever.

Computers got better. Medical care is better. Fine.

OK, now go build a rocket, or a plane, or a car. Chances are, you'd build the same thing as we had 30 years ago with the same materials, the same physical principles, the same energy sources, the same theories.

What is so hard to grasp about this?
 
2013-12-05 12:46:37 PM  

mr lawson: Quantum Apostrophe: bleak, dreadful and misanthropic existence.

I see no bleak, dreadful and misanthropic future. Only hope and happiness as mankind fully reaches its true potential for greatness as we cast off these fears and doubts of the unknown and unleash the the true loving power of humanity.


Yet individuals can FOAD. There is no unknown. It's quite known. Space is empty, huge, deadly and hostile. There. Save your money. No one's going anywhere.

I don't see a bleak future either, I see humanity adapting to the realities of our shrinking cheap-energy sources, our limited materials and technology, and building a better and happier future right here on Earth.

Because I have news for you. You seem to think you can run away from what you perceive as the less desirable aspects of humanity in some sort of toy.

But you're bringing humanity with you.

So it makes no sense.

Our future will consist of massive social changes, but selfish, small-minded adult-children gearheads like you can't see that.

Maybe 20 more years?
 
2013-12-05 12:47:49 PM  

Lando Lincoln: mr lawson: Lando Lincoln: . We've got a lot of stupid to stamp out of existence first.

including statements like this

So you're saying that the human race is ready to go and spread our population to other systems? You really believe this?


The idea that we can achieve a Utopia from starting over and change the nature of our species is as preposterous as believing that we can stamp out the stupid here. I don't know about you, but I think it is time that we stop hating each other and find some common ground. Creating a mind-share of best and brightest minds and working toward a common goal will hopefully help unite us rather than the division we have right now. We are becoming increasingly a global society, but instead of promoting community, it is promoting competition and conflict. This is a very good way to distract everyone from the day-to-day problems that are mostly fabrications of having too much damn time on their hands to compare dicks or biatch and moan.
 
2013-12-05 12:48:45 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: But you're bringing humanity with you


only the good kind.
You need not apply.
 
2013-12-05 12:48:51 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Space is empty, huge, deadly and hostile.


So is Australia...
 
2013-12-05 12:49:29 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: OK, now go build a rocket, or a plane, or a car. Chances are, you'd build the same thing as we had 30 years ago with the same materials, the same physical principles, the same energy sources, the same theories.

What is so hard to grasp about this?



Or I could go buiild a rocket, or a plane, or a car and chances are I'd be building something vastly different from the things we had 300 years ago with different materials, with different physical principles, with different energy sources, with different theories.

What is so hard to grasp about this?
 
2013-12-05 12:50:03 PM  

the money is in the banana stand: The idea that we can achieve a Utopia from starting over and change the nature of our species is as preposterous as believing that we can stamp out the stupid here.


you stamp out most of the stupid by not allowing the "stupid" to enter in the first place.
 
2013-12-05 12:51:55 PM  

give me doughnuts: Quantum Apostrophe: OK, now go build a rocket, or a plane, or a car. Chances are, you'd build the same thing as we had 30 years ago with the same materials, the same physical principles, the same energy sources, the same theories.

What is so hard to grasp about this?


Or I could go buiild a rocket, or a plane, or a car and chances are I'd be building something vastly different from the things we had 300 years ago with different materials, with different physical principles, with different energy sources, with different theories.

What is so hard to grasp about this?


Trust me, guys - you're much better off just putting him on ignore.  He's worse than Bevets or CzarAngelus.  Save yourself the trouble, there's no point in arguing with him.

Never wrestle with a pig.  You'll both get dirty, but the pig enjoys it.
 
2013-12-05 12:52:09 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: OK, now go build a rocket, or a plane, or a car. Chances are, you'd build the same thing as we had 30 years ago with the same materials, the same physical principles, the same energy sources, the same theories.


Not the same economics.
Untapped Demand is there
Lower the supply cost and things change.

What is so hard to grasp about this?
 
2013-12-05 12:54:13 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Dingleberry Dickwad: You're more than welcome to go live with only the tech we had 30 years ago. That would at least spare us your idiocy. Make sure you also tell the doctor that any evaluation and treatment for whatever you're visiting him/her must be done only with what was available to them 30 years ago as well.

Yet none of those things are what's required to enable the insane Space Nutter ideas. Glad to see we agree. 30 years ago we already had computers everywhere, cars and planes did the same thing, houses and food and clothes were the same.

None of the changes from the last 30 years point to better propulsion on the scale to match the size of space. We're still going to LEO and GEO, we're still sending (better) tin cans to take (better) pictures of remote dead rocks.

The basic principles haven't changed in 30 years, and there is nothing to indicate we've missed some huge chunk of physics or chemistry.

I don't know how to put it plainer. You're conflating things that don't compare and think you're clever.

Computers got better. Medical care is better. Fine.

OK, now go build a rocket, or a plane, or a car. Chances are, you'd build the same thing as we had 30 years ago with the same materials, the same physical principles, the same energy sources, the same theories.

What is so hard to grasp about this?


Do you try to be a condescending jerk in these threads, or is it something you can't control? If it's the former, your message gets lost in the delivery. If it's the latter, you have my sympathies.
 
2013-12-05 12:55:46 PM  

give me doughnuts: Quantum Apostrophe: OK, now go build a rocket, or a plane, or a car. Chances are, you'd build the same thing as we had 30 years ago with the same materials, the same physical principles, the same energy sources, the same theories.

What is so hard to grasp about this?


Or I could go buiild a rocket, or a plane, or a car and chances are I'd be building something vastly different from the things we had 300 years ago with different materials, with different physical principles, with different energy sources, with different theories.

What is so hard to grasp about this?


No no, you don't understand. You have to look small scale! You're talking 300 years ago! You have to stick to his extremely narrow guidelines for comparing knowledge and tech over a period of time, otherwise his argument looks like the blatherings of a threadshiatting attention whoring troll.
 
2013-12-05 01:01:37 PM  

Thrag: I don't have a Duna base yet, but here is my latest rover mission to Mun.


Hey, not bad. Never actually found that one myself.


Now let's see if you can do it with a few more Kerbals...

www.smidgeindustriesltd.com


104 Kerbals to Mun and (almost) back home. I can probably do it by tuning my flight profile for better efficiency, but getting another ~300m/s or so after LKO would also be really helpful.

Payload: ~184 tons. Total rocket is ~1,600 tons on the launchpad. I might stick some nukes on it and try getting one to Duna next...
=Smidge=
 
2013-12-05 01:02:12 PM  

the money is in the banana stand: The idea that we can achieve a Utopia from starting over and change the nature of our species is as preposterous as believing that we can stamp out the stupid here. I don't know about you, but I think it is time that we stop hating each other and find some common ground. Creating a mind-share of best and brightest minds and working toward a common goal will hopefully help unite us rather than the division we have right now. We are becoming increasingly a global society, but instead of promoting community, it is promoting competition and conflict. This is a very good way to distract everyone from the day-to-day problems that are mostly fabrications of having too much damn time on their hands to compare dicks or biatch and moan.


Until we move on from our religious/tribal/pre-disposed-to-war ways, we should contain our stupid to this planet. We can't even manage to feed the starving or heal the sick and we want to go even further? That's not a good idea.

I don't think that us working on goals of even further colonization is going to help mend those problems. Unless we colonize Mars and shoot all of the assholes over there so they can start their own asshole colony. Worked for the British and the Pilgrims.
 
2013-12-05 01:02:50 PM  

grinding_journalist: Quantum Apostrophe: No, the ones that keep fantasizing about impossible technologies and remote possibilities are the ones wasting their time.

Oh yeah? What if we discover a comet on a collision course with Earth whose mass renders it an ELE object?

What then, smart guy with all the answers?


Then we all die.
 
2013-12-05 01:06:31 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: machoprogrammer: Quantum Apostrophe: mr lawson: Lando Lincoln: So you think that space tourism is going to fund a trip to Mars and beyond. Hm. Well...good luck.

In it's entirety? Absolutely not! The purpose of "tourism" plan would be two fold. First, help defray cost of initial R&D and secondly, build goodwill with a large base of people who will not qualify to be part of the continual space operations (plus it will be a hell of a recruitment tool).

We don't even have supersonic passenger transport right here where everything is. Once the novelty wears off, why do you see people caring about space?

They were already bored by Apollo 12.

Get real. Give me your money, at least you'll have helped a real person with real problems. Not played Grown Up LEGOs.

So you think we are at our technological maximum right now? Oh wow...

Um, have you seen many real changes and breakthroughs in the last 30 years? We're still coasting on physics from the 1920s mostly.

I would really like to know why and how you believe the things you do.


Quantum computers, cell phones, nanobots are all recent developments and pretty dang breakthroughy. Look how much has changed even over the past 5 years. GPSs in our car were breakthrough; now almost no one uses them because our freaking phones can do that.

NASA is actually working on FTL technology and ways to get around the universe. People are lazy and we have been able to, mostly coast using the old physics. However, when that well dries up, greed and ingenuity will push more breakthroughs. Hell, look at the 1400s-1700s. There was no real breakthroughs for 300+ years. Then, in the 1800s, we had the industrial revolution. Then in the 1900s, we had the break technology revolution. And you think not being able to go from "going to space" to "going to another star" in 50 years is a lot? Who knows what is going to happen even 10 years from now
 
2013-12-05 01:09:27 PM  

Smidge204: Thrag: I don't have a Duna base yet, but here is my latest rover mission to Mun.

Hey, not bad. Never actually found that one myself.


Now let's see if you can do it with a few more Kerbals...

[www.smidgeindustriesltd.com image 489x757]


104 Kerbals to Mun and (almost) back home. I can probably do it by tuning my flight profile for better efficiency, but getting another ~300m/s or so after LKO would also be really helpful.

Payload: ~184 tons. Total rocket is ~1,600 tons on the launchpad. I might stick some nukes on it and try getting one to Duna next...
=Smidge=


I'd switch the positions of the orage tanks and the half-height ones that are just above them. The metal tanks conduct heat better than the foam tanks and can help lower the risk of overheats
 
2013-12-05 01:09:34 PM  

RedPhoenix122: Not to mentioned the technology developed during this process could be adapted for things that we use every day.


This is where I disagree with most people. Technology should researched for what we use every day, and use that offshoots of that research to get into space.

E.g. working fusion and super-conductors go a long way into solving a lot of space exploration problems.
 
2013-12-05 01:11:11 PM  

impaler: RedPhoenix122: Not to mentioned the technology developed during this process could be adapted for things that we use every day.

This is where I disagree with most people. Technology should researched for what we use every day, and use that offshoots of that research to get into space.

E.g. working fusion and super-conductors go a long way into solving a lot of space exploration problems.


True, but advances in propulsion technology could go a long way into solving our energy crisis.
 
2013-12-05 01:11:23 PM  
Quantum Apostrophe:
No, the ones that keep fantasizing about impossible technologies and remote possibilities are the ones wasting their time.

img.photobucket.com

There are rules in life! We cannot fly to the moon. We cannot defy death. We must face facts, not folly. You don't live in the real world.
 
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