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(CNBC)   Medical costs continue to soar. A single stitch in a hospital now costs $500, according to chief of surgery George Armani   (cnbc.com) divider line 61
    More: Asinine, medical equipment, hospital network, profit center  
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1029 clicks; posted to Business » on 05 Dec 2013 at 9:52 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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vpb [TotalFark]
2013-12-05 08:29:56 AM  
Someone has to pay for the indigent.  Or maybe for the CEO's new Gulfstream.
 
2013-12-05 08:41:35 AM  
This is why even if you come up with all the payment arrangements you want--Obamacare, single payer, what have you--it's never going to be enough until you rein in the cost of health care.
 
2013-12-05 08:53:56 AM  

xanadian: This is why even if you come up with all the payment arrangements you want--Obamacare, single payer, what have you--it's never going to be enough until you rein in the cost of health care.


Ah, but that is considered SOCALISMS and it's why we won't ever consider bringing the prices back down to reality.
 
2013-12-05 08:59:24 AM  
Nice headline.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-12-05 08:59:51 AM  
Charges for emergency care without a meaningful opportunity to negotiate price should be limited to the marginal cost of providing the care. Now give me my Nobel Prize in Economics.
 
2013-12-05 09:55:03 AM  
It starts with the cost of Med School and spirals upward from there. Malpractice insurance, HMO overhead, Hospital overhead, etc.

The industry of health is rotten to the core and has been for years.

Luckily, we can blame Obama.
 
2013-12-05 09:59:41 AM  

xanadian: This is why even if you come up with all the payment arrangements you want--Obamacare, single payer, what have you--it's never going to be enough until you rein in the cost of health care.


Obamacare will reign in the costs a little though, because most everyone will be insured and the insurance companies negotiate with hospitals on what they'll pay them.

That doesn't mean the prices won't continue to go up though, we really need to do single payer with a system in which the US government bids for things like medical devices and sets costs. But as Weaver95 said, that's socialism. BOOGABOOGABOOGABOOGA!!!
 
2013-12-05 10:03:05 AM  

bdub77: xanadian: This is why even if you come up with all the payment arrangements you want--Obamacare, single payer, what have you--it's never going to be enough until you rein in the cost of health care.

Obamacare will reign in the costs a little though, because most everyone will be insured and the insurance companies negotiate with hospitals on what they'll pay them.

That doesn't mean the prices won't continue to go up though, we really need to do single payer with a system in which the US government bids for things like medical devices and sets costs. But as Weaver95 said, that's socialism. BOOGABOOGABOOGABOOGA!!!


That is not socialism.  That is a monopoly.
 
2013-12-05 10:11:28 AM  

H31N0US: It starts with the cost of Med School and spirals upward from there. Malpractice insurance, HMO overhead, Hospital overhead, etc.

The industry of health is rotten to the core and has been for years.

Luckily, we can blame Obama.


That's what happens when you put a... one of those kind of people behind the controls of a time machine.
 
2013-12-05 10:15:21 AM  
Canadian here, too lazy to look it up. I tore my ACL and had it fixed a while ago. From injury to surgery, my total wait time was about 10 months, which included time to get in to see a sports medicine specialist, get an MRI, and get space in a hospital bed. Outside of paying user fees for rehabilitation ($70/session) and the medication (antibiotics and painkillers, less than $30, I think), I didn't have to pay anything at all. How much would I have to pay in the states and how fast could I get it done?
 
2013-12-05 10:29:14 AM  
That's why I'm opening my own big box medical supply store for do-it-yourselfers, Surgical Staples.
 
2013-12-05 10:30:16 AM  
I just had a regular checkup, and the doctor decided she wanted to see some bloodwork (thyroid, CBC, vitamin levels)  Had a single blood draw.  A week later I get a bill in the mail for $2200 for JUST the bloodwork, not including the physical exam.

Seriously.

Luckily I have good insurance (their "allowable" was closer to $800 to start with) but seriously - what in the actual fark are they doing that they feel charging over two thousand dollars for a couple of very basic, routine lab tests is remotely reasonable?

The American health care system is so entirely farked.  The rest of the world must think we're morons for putting up with this.
 
2013-12-05 10:30:33 AM  

Toquinha: Canadian here, too lazy to look it up. I tore my ACL and had it fixed a while ago. From injury to surgery, my total wait time was about 10 months, which included time to get in to see a sports medicine specialist, get an MRI, and get space in a hospital bed. Outside of paying user fees for rehabilitation ($70/session) and the medication (antibiotics and painkillers, less than $30, I think), I didn't have to pay anything at all. How much would I have to pay in the states and how fast could I get it done?


How much you'll pay depends on how fast you get it done and how fast you get it done depends on how much you'll pay.

That said, based on what I remember from friends tearing their ACL, I would expect a time of less than 2 months from injury to surgery.  I may be wrong on that, though, since it's been a while since anyone I know had that kind of injury.
 
2013-12-05 10:31:05 AM  

Toquinha: Canadian here, too lazy to look it up. I tore my ACL and had it fixed a while ago. From injury to surgery, my total wait time was about 10 months, which included time to get in to see a sports medicine specialist, get an MRI, and get space in a hospital bed. Outside of paying user fees for rehabilitation ($70/session) and the medication (antibiotics and painkillers, less than $30, I think), I didn't have to pay anything at all. How much would I have to pay in the states and how fast could I get it done?


About $35,000, just for the surgery, on average, and that doesn't count the pre- or post-surgery costs. For example, the cost of a knee MRI alone can vary from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars - we have few price controls. There's a reason consumers are encouraged to shop around here.

The time from injury to surgery would be somewhat faster, however, depending on how much you wanted to spend. More money = faster surgery.
 
2013-12-05 10:41:33 AM  
He doesn't have a time line that I noticed, but here is the cost breakdown:

http://calv.info/the-cost-of-an-acl/
 
2013-12-05 10:53:00 AM  

FormlessOne: Toquinha: Canadian here, too lazy to look it up. I tore my ACL and had it fixed a while ago. From injury to surgery, my total wait time was about 10 months, which included time to get in to see a sports medicine specialist, get an MRI, and get space in a hospital bed. Outside of paying user fees for rehabilitation ($70/session) and the medication (antibiotics and painkillers, less than $30, I think), I didn't have to pay anything at all. How much would I have to pay in the states and how fast could I get it done?

About $35,000, just for the surgery, on average, and that doesn't count the pre- or post-surgery costs. For example, the cost of a knee MRI alone can vary from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars - we have few price controls. There's a reason consumers are encouraged to shop around here.

The time from injury to surgery would be somewhat faster, however, depending on how much you wanted to spend. More money = faster surgery.


To me, that's insane. I was quoted $9000 to get it done privately, but I could get in right away.
 
2013-12-05 10:56:58 AM  
Only $500?  That honestly seems low to me for American hospitals.
 
2013-12-05 10:59:52 AM  

xanadian: This is why even if you come up with all the payment arrangements you want--Obamacare, single payer, what have you--it's never going to be enough until you rein in the cost of health care.


But that would be like regulation, man.
 
2013-12-05 11:01:46 AM  

wingnut396: He doesn't have a time line that I noticed, but here is the cost breakdown:

http://calv.info/the-cost-of-an-acl/


There is so much messed up about that, from the exorbitant cost of prescription drugs to the fact the first 30 minutes in the OR costs half as much as every additional 5 minutes.
 
2013-12-05 11:08:07 AM  

TheSelphie: Only $500?  That honestly seems low to me for American hospitals.


Over the summer, I needed some stitches (6, I think) in my foot. As I recall, my total out-of-pocket was about $20-25 (I have insurance) plus another $20 for supplies.

~45 minutes in the clinic, a doctor and a PA/nurse to anesthetize, stitch (x6) and patch, and a receptionist to handle the paperwork = $800 without insurance. (Might have been $1300, but I think I'm confusing that with another hospital visit a few years back.)

// good god, and that topical anesthetic needle looks like a damned harpoon
 
2013-12-05 11:14:05 AM  

Saiga410: bdub77: xanadian: This is why even if you come up with all the payment arrangements you want--Obamacare, single payer, what have you--it's never going to be enough until you rein in the cost of health care.

Obamacare will reign in the costs a little though, because most everyone will be insured and the insurance companies negotiate with hospitals on what they'll pay them.

That doesn't mean the prices won't continue to go up though, we really need to do single payer with a system in which the US government bids for things like medical devices and sets costs. But as Weaver95 said, that's socialism. BOOGABOOGABOOGABOOGA!!!

That is not socialism.  That is a monopoly.


Seems to do just fine for the military - they're happier with their coverage/care than we are, they pay less than we do for similar services, and they were even able to prosecute many wars while being cared for in such a socialist manner.

With 1.5 million active-duty military personnel, 850k reservists and probably (at least close to) tens of millions of dependents, the VA is probably the largest single provider of care/insurance in every state. If you're scared of "socialism" ruining things, start by not using an example where socialism isn't ruining things.

WalMart is able to negotiate prices with suppliers, correct? Why can't the government do the same? Socialism?

// talk about "booga booga booga"
// "socialism" was a killing word before it was cool
 
2013-12-05 11:31:53 AM  
My son needed stitches on a sunday evening from tussling with his brother.  3 hour wait, 3 stitches, $1200.
 
2013-12-05 11:47:34 AM  

Dr Dreidel: Saiga410: bdub77: xanadian: This is why even if you come up with all the payment arrangements you want--Obamacare, single payer, what have you--it's never going to be enough until you rein in the cost of health care.

Obamacare will reign in the costs a little though, because most everyone will be insured and the insurance companies negotiate with hospitals on what they'll pay them.

That doesn't mean the prices won't continue to go up though, we really need to do single payer with a system in which the US government bids for things like medical devices and sets costs. But as Weaver95 said, that's socialism. BOOGABOOGABOOGABOOGA!!!

That is not socialism.  That is a monopoly.

Seems to do just fine for the military - they're happier with their coverage/care than we are, they pay less than we do for similar services, and they were even able to prosecute many wars while being cared for in such a socialist manner.

With 1.5 million active-duty military personnel, 850k reservists and probably (at least close to) tens of millions of dependents, the VA is probably the largest single provider of care/insurance in every state. If you're scared of "socialism" ruining things, start by not using an example where socialism isn't ruining things.

WalMart is able to negotiate prices with suppliers, correct? Why can't the government do the same? Socialism?

// talk about "booga booga booga"
// "socialism" was a killing word before it was cool


I would have thought medicare/medicaid would be bigger.

/former soldier
//glad I have better health care now
 
2013-12-05 11:52:36 AM  

H31N0US: It starts with the cost of Med School and spirals upward from there. Malpractice insurance, HMO overhead, Hospital overhead, etc.

The industry of health is rotten to the core and has been for years.

Luckily, we can blame Obama.



yep, Obama is retroactive.  he's conveniently guilty so the actual guilty won't feel guilty and can live their lives of leisure.
 
2013-12-05 11:54:17 AM  

aneki: My son needed stitches on a sunday evening from tussling with his brother.  3 hour wait, 3 stitches, $1200.



i bet the margin on that is sweet!   who said a doctor couldn't retire at age 40 with a couple of 19 year old sweet things??
 
2013-12-05 11:55:47 AM  

Russ1642: xanadian: This is why even if you come up with all the payment arrangements you want--Obamacare, single payer, what have you--it's never going to be enough until you rein in the cost of health care.

But that would be like regulation, man.



regulation is, like, uncool, man.    groovy.
 
2013-12-05 11:58:27 AM  

Toquinha: Canadian here, too lazy to look it up. I tore my ACL and had it fixed a while ago. From injury to surgery, my total wait time was about 10 months, which included time to get in to see a sports medicine specialist, get an MRI, and get space in a hospital bed. Outside of paying user fees for rehabilitation ($70/session) and the medication (antibiotics and painkillers, less than $30, I think), I didn't have to pay anything at all. How much would I have to pay in the states and how fast could I get it done?



the time to get it done would depend on the dollars you have and/or the health insurance you have.  if you pay cash, the son of a biatches would come out to you house and do it. (:

if you have good insurance, the time factor would be much better than 10 months.

if you are uninsured, they would tell you to fark off, free loader, and move to socialist canada.  (:

anytime you want to swap citizenship, you let me know.
 
2013-12-05 12:00:00 PM  
My daughter busted her head open this summer. Not a big cut but kinda deep and it bled a lot. 45 minutes in the ER and some glue and she was good to go. $600 bucks!
 
2013-12-05 12:01:23 PM  

Toquinha: Canadian here, too lazy to look it up. I tore my ACL and had it fixed a while ago. From injury to surgery, my total wait time was about 10 months, which included time to get in to see a sports medicine specialist, get an MRI, and get space in a hospital bed. Outside of paying user fees for rehabilitation ($70/session) and the medication (antibiotics and painkillers, less than $30, I think), I didn't have to pay anything at all. How much would I have to pay in the states and how fast could I get it done?



also, how much pain were you in??   if not much, then i can understand the wait.  they have more pressing surgeries that would supercede yours.

if in alot of pain, then that's farked up.
 
2013-12-05 12:02:37 PM  

Mr. Breeze: My daughter busted her head open this summer. Not a big cut but kinda deep and it bled a lot. 45 minutes in the ER and some glue and she was good to go. $600 bucks!



if you had been willing to spend 1200, they'd have come out to your house to do it.   (:
 
2013-12-05 12:04:48 PM  

Linux_Yes: Toquinha: Canadian here, too lazy to look it up. I tore my ACL and had it fixed a while ago. From injury to surgery, my total wait time was about 10 months, which included time to get in to see a sports medicine specialist, get an MRI, and get space in a hospital bed. Outside of paying user fees for rehabilitation ($70/session) and the medication (antibiotics and painkillers, less than $30, I think), I didn't have to pay anything at all. How much would I have to pay in the states and how fast could I get it done?


also, how much pain were you in??   if not much, then i can understand the wait.  they have more pressing surgeries that would supercede yours.

if in alot of pain, then that's farked up.


Less farked up than the US system of "you don't have good insurance or $35,000 laying around?  No surgery for you. Ever.  Enjoy the rest of your life as a disabled person!"
 
2013-12-05 12:06:02 PM  

Toquinha: FormlessOne: Toquinha: Canadian here, too lazy to look it up. I tore my ACL and had it fixed a while ago. From injury to surgery, my total wait time was about 10 months, which included time to get in to see a sports medicine specialist, get an MRI, and get space in a hospital bed. Outside of paying user fees for rehabilitation ($70/session) and the medication (antibiotics and painkillers, less than $30, I think), I didn't have to pay anything at all. How much would I have to pay in the states and how fast could I get it done?

About $35,000, just for the surgery, on average, and that doesn't count the pre- or post-surgery costs. For example, the cost of a knee MRI alone can vary from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars - we have few price controls. There's a reason consumers are encouraged to shop around here.

The time from injury to surgery would be somewhat faster, however, depending on how much you wanted to spend. More money = faster surgery.

To me, that's insane. I was quoted $9000 to get it done privately, but I could get in right away.



and for 12,000, a pretty nurse would have given you a blow job afterwards.   they care about their patients.
 
2013-12-05 12:08:02 PM  

Freudian_slipknot: The American health care system is so entirely farked. The rest of the world must think we're morons for putting up with this.


Yes we do.

Americans will riot if they think they are overcherged 1cent on gas but will bend over and take 1000% markup on healthcare.

We in Britain pay almost half as much on healthcare per person than America does. For that we get the NHS and private hospitals if you want to pay. The country that comes close to America's spend is France, and they have a much better sysyem (by results, not profits) than either country.
 
2013-12-05 01:06:25 PM  

Toquinha: Canadian here, too lazy to look it up. I tore my ACL and had it fixed a while ago. From injury to surgery, my total wait time was about 10 months, which included time to get in to see a sports medicine specialist, get an MRI, and get space in a hospital bed. Outside of paying user fees for rehabilitation ($70/session) and the medication (antibiotics and painkillers, less than $30, I think), I didn't have to pay anything at all. How much would I have to pay in the states and how fast could I get it done?


A friend of mine shattered her elbow and had surgery to repair it within three days. All costs, including the emergency room and therapy were covered, less miscellaneous $20 copays for doctor and therapist visits and drugs. Probably two or three hundred out of pocket. Her Kaiser HMO insurance -- which she buys individually not via an employer -- costs her $768 a month.
 
2013-12-05 01:08:22 PM  

Toquinha: FormlessOne: Toquinha: Canadian here, too lazy to look it up. I tore my ACL and had it fixed a while ago. From injury to surgery, my total wait time was about 10 months, which included time to get in to see a sports medicine specialist, get an MRI, and get space in a hospital bed. Outside of paying user fees for rehabilitation ($70/session) and the medication (antibiotics and painkillers, less than $30, I think), I didn't have to pay anything at all. How much would I have to pay in the states and how fast could I get it done?

About $35,000, just for the surgery, on average, and that doesn't count the pre- or post-surgery costs. For example, the cost of a knee MRI alone can vary from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars - we have few price controls. There's a reason consumers are encouraged to shop around here.

The time from injury to surgery would be somewhat faster, however, depending on how much you wanted to spend. More money = faster surgery.

To me, that's insane. I was quoted $9000 to get it done privately, but I could get in right away.


Just had it done last year.  A week to let the swelling go down and had the surgery, then 1.5 month of recovery.  The outpatient surgery billed as I recall about $8k of which I had 80/20 coverage and a negotiated rate that took a big chunk out of it.  to meet my out of pocket for the year it ended  up being $1200.
 
2013-12-05 01:12:33 PM  

Norfolking Chance: Americans will riot if they think they are overcherged 1cent on gas but will bend over and take 1000% markup on healthcare.


That's because almost always somebody else is picking up the tab, either insurance or the taxpayers. And those entities always negotiate a better rate than the exorbitant sums that providers stick the individual wretches with. They're the only ones who actually feel these costs, and they're very few in number and not organized.
 
2013-12-05 01:28:59 PM  

Ima_Lurker: I would have thought medicare/medicaid would be bigger.

/former soldier
//glad I have better health care now


The VA system and Medicare/Medicaid are fundamentally different.

The VA system is actually a health care delivery platform.  The VA employs doctors, nurses, technicians.  They have buildings you go to for care delivery.

Medicare/Medicaid is a health insurance system.  They do not deliver care, they deliver money.  The people who deliver the care do not work for Medicare or Medicaid.  They send their bill to Medicare/Medicaid.  The only buildings medicare and medicaid has holds administrative people and computers that handle premiums (medicare), bills (both) and resolves disputes about such things.

And both are structurally easier to deal with than the bastardized mess private insurance or employer provided insurance the working public has to deal with.

/CSB - 2014 health care costs for the employees of a major US corporation are going to be lower, with no reduction of benefits, than 2013.  First time since I've started working here (18 years ago) this has happened.  Either it's been the same or higher.  Thanks Obama!  I still want single payer though.
 
2013-12-05 02:02:05 PM  

Linux_Yes: aneki: My son needed stitches on a sunday evening from tussling with his brother.  3 hour wait, 3 stitches, $1200.

i bet the margin on that is sweet!   who said a doctor couldn't retire at age 40 with a couple of 19 year old sweet things??


The doctors don't get much of that sweet margin. The hospital or clinic shareholders get it. You know...the 1%.
 
2013-12-05 02:06:21 PM  
Mine cost ~$140, but the whole visit at the ER when I sliced my finger open on a tin can deep enough to see tendon, but not really more than need a single stitch was ~$900.

The break down was as follows
$140 for that actual stitch
$140 for the doctor's time
~$620 for the ER.

Bonus!  They initially billed me as uninsured despite my having insurance.

This was in August.  I just got the corrected bill last week, it's due on the 19th, and total will be about $250 out of pocket.
 
2013-12-05 02:27:21 PM  

Krieghund: Linux_Yes: aneki: My son needed stitches on a sunday evening from tussling with his brother.  3 hour wait, 3 stitches, $1200.

i bet the margin on that is sweet!   who said a doctor couldn't retire at age 40 with a couple of 19 year old sweet things??

The doctors don't get much of that sweet margin. The hospital or clinic shareholders get it. You know...the 1%.


Although in some instances it is the doctors that are the shareholders.
 
2013-12-05 02:42:34 PM  
Around these here parts, it cost $500 just to chat with the doctor for 10 minutes. If you are lucky, he might give you some advice,  that could possibly be helpful to your situation.
 
2013-12-05 02:56:39 PM  
Sickening stuff. For a civilized society to have a for-profit healthcare industry is insane. How is it different from police protection or firefighters? Why not make people shop around for a fire company when their house is on fire? Because it's insane, that's why.

Back when I lived in the Soviet Union, healthcare wasn't perfect, we had long lines, but we weren't afraid that a stitch would send us into financial ruin for the rest of our lives. And doctors were still caring because they liked what they were doing, not because they were getting paid millions.

I am heavily on the libertarian side, but healthcare is a basic necessity in a civilized country.

Charging 10,000% markup for a person that has no way to chose is criminal.
 
2013-12-05 03:03:25 PM  

sdd2000: Krieghund: Linux_Yes: aneki: My son needed stitches on a sunday evening from tussling with his brother.  3 hour wait, 3 stitches, $1200.

i bet the margin on that is sweet!   who said a doctor couldn't retire at age 40 with a couple of 19 year old sweet things??

The doctors don't get much of that sweet margin. The hospital or clinic shareholders get it. You know...the 1%.

Although in some instances it is the doctors that are the shareholders.


That probably won't last long though. I'm shocked at the orthopedic surgeon charges for a fanned ACL repair. For a non life threatening surgery with little threat of lawsuits performed on largelyhhealthy patients, that charge is downright ludicrous. Speaking as an anesthesiologist, the 2k dollars they charged would be a fair price IF, he had gotten a block out of it. He didn't.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-12-05 03:19:22 PM  
zyrian: For a civilized society to have a for-profit healthcare industry is insane.

From the web site of the hospital in question, emphasis mine: California Pacific Medical Center is one of the largest private, not-for-profit, academic medical centers in California and is a Sutter Health affiliate.

The problem is distribution of overhead costs, hence my suggestion that only marginal costs of care be billed to involuntary patients. This would probably require some government subsidies to become more overt.
 
2013-12-05 03:30:07 PM  

xanadian: This is why even if you come up with all the payment arrangements you want--Obamacare, single payer, what have you--it's never going to be enough until you rein in the cost of health care.


Did you stop to ask yourself why it's so expensive?  It's not a profit problem.  It's the problem of 40 - 60% of US bankruptcies being caused by medical expenses.  With no basic insurance, no basic care, they default on the expense (and bankrupted medical costs tend to be the highest - cancer, transplants, long intensive care hospitalizations).  That money has to come from somewhere.  They get it from little Johnny, who's getting his stitch.  Might only cost $200 for all of the care and exams, but he and his insurance gets charged $500 to make up for Betsy Sue, who had no insurance and got chemo for her brain cancer and several days of hospital stay.  Her family declared bankruptcy, and the hospital is out $150,000 for months of life-saving care.

It'll take about 500 Johnny's to make up for one Betsy Sue, but that's where they get it.  They'll charge you $10 for a bandaid and $60 for gauze for the same reason.  Want to get medical costs under control?  Get EVERYONE insurance.  Regardless of employment, medical status, residency, whatever.  Balance the cost, so it's not just employed and insured folks paying 3x rates on everything to make up for mass bankruptcies.
 
2013-12-05 03:41:55 PM  
Who the fark is George Armani?  Is he related to Giorgio?
 
2013-12-05 04:48:31 PM  
Living in Belgium. I registered with a Walk-in clinic as my primary care provider an in combination with my insurance I pay 0$ to see the doctor. Had a couple bloodtests done for a total of about 12$ each time. The only thing is that I must use this clinic whenever I need a doctor unless it is an emergency.
 
2013-12-05 05:57:13 PM  

jjorsett: Toquinha: Canadian here, too lazy to look it up. I tore my ACL and had it fixed a while ago. From injury to surgery, my total wait time was about 10 months, which included time to get in to see a sports medicine specialist, get an MRI, and get space in a hospital bed. Outside of paying user fees for rehabilitation ($70/session) and the medication (antibiotics and painkillers, less than $30, I think), I didn't have to pay anything at all. How much would I have to pay in the states and how fast could I get it done?

A friend of mine shattered her elbow and had surgery to repair it within three days. All costs, including the emergency room and therapy were covered, less miscellaneous $20 copays for doctor and therapist visits and drugs. Probably two or three hundred out of pocket. Her Kaiser HMO insurance -- which she buys individually not via an employer -- costs her $768 a month.


A shattered elbow ain't a torn ACL. But you don't care about comparing apples to apples, do you, because that would make your point...well, not a point at all.

Why is it your points always seemed to be based on false information and deliberate distortion?
 
2013-12-05 06:46:56 PM  

Freudian_slipknot: The American health care system is so entirely farked. The rest of the world must think we're morons for putting up with this.


It is quite baffling, yes, especially when directly north you have a country that provides Universal healthcare.

The Canadian healthcare system is far from perfect, but no Canadian ever went bankrupt trying to pay for cancer treatments.

And aside from rare, horrible incidents, if you need the medical care, you're going to get it. My mom was diagnosed with breast cancer on a Friday, started chemo the following Monday. I broke my ankle and was back at home with a temporary cast (for swelling) 3 hours later. The time between saying 'yes' to an emergency c-section to being in the OR for our kids' birth was less than five minutes.

Total cost: $0.
 
2013-12-05 07:44:46 PM  

Norfolking Chance: Americans will riot if they think they are overcherged 1cent on gas but will bend over and take 1000% markup on healthcare.


I WISH it was only 1000%.
 
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