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(CNN)   The future of artificial heart technology looks like something that fell out of a '68 Oldsmobile engine compartment   (cnn.com) divider line 43
    More: Cool, Oldsmobile, Cohn, liver failure, Wright Brothers, Ventricular Assist Device  
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4745 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Dec 2013 at 10:47 PM (43 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



43 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-12-04 08:50:40 PM
They're going to sell that thing to Mr. Nikopopolous...
 
2013-12-04 08:52:14 PM
Subby, that's a Mopar waterpump.  No way that came out of an Olds.
 
2013-12-04 09:21:06 PM

Nefarious: Subby, that's a Mopar waterpump.  No way that came out of an Olds.


Nah it's a Chevy supercharger.
 
2013-12-04 10:27:32 PM
BiVADs are already in use in the United States, and have been for some time.

It's a pretty trippy thing to be talking to someone while they're in VTach/VFib, and you can't palpate a pulse.
 
2013-12-04 10:50:00 PM
So how many more years before I can theoretically survive being stabbed by a Nausicaan? This is important.
 
2013-12-04 10:55:06 PM
 
2013-12-04 10:59:13 PM
Something something "3d printing" yada yada "adult stem cells".
 
2013-12-04 11:03:36 PM
Timms' group also brought a 3-D printer, which enables the medical staff to quickly make its own parts for the artificial heart. Within days, the doctors can print a new part that pumps the blood and then can evaluate its performance, a process that once took months.

Oh snap.  Increased life expectancy through rapid 3D printed prototyping.  #DIV/0
 
2013-12-04 11:06:01 PM
What a load of 19th century Steampunk crap.

You know what I want?

Stempunk.

Grow a real, biological organ from the person's DNA, (repairing the bad code that let the heart go bad in the first place if needed).

Biology already figured out how to grow organs from one cell. When will we?

Too complicated? Too hard?

Where's the 21st century equivalent of "we choose to do these things not because they are easy, but because they are hard"?
 
2013-12-04 11:11:12 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: What a load of 19th century Steampunk crap.

You know what I want?

Stempunk.

Grow a real, biological organ from the person's DNA, (repairing the bad code that let the heart go bad in the first place if needed).

Biology already figured out how to grow organs from one cell. When will we?

Too complicated? Too hard?

Where's the 21st century equivalent of "we choose to do these things not because they are easy, but because they are hard"?


Well for starters, Republicans completely gutted stem-cell research because Jesus.
 
2013-12-04 11:18:09 PM

RaceDTruck: Nefarious: Subby, that's a Mopar waterpump.  No way that came out of an Olds.

Nah it's a Chevy supercharger.


You're all wrong, it's a torque converter.
 
2013-12-04 11:19:53 PM

AbiNormal: RaceDTruck: Nefarious: Subby, that's a Mopar waterpump.  No way that came out of an Olds.

Nah it's a Chevy supercharger.

You're all wrong, it's a torque converter.


A toque converter?  I thought poutine was bad for the heart
 
2013-12-04 11:23:10 PM
Kanemitsu
spikeville.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-12-04 11:33:07 PM
I read this article in a two year old Popular  Mechanics at the barbershop the other day.

Didn't read the whole article but isn't this the way a heart/lung machine has worked for the last couple decades?
 
2013-12-04 11:34:17 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: What a load of 19th century Steampunk crap.

You know what I want?

Stempunk.

Grow a real, biological organ from the person's DNA, (repairing the bad code that let the heart go bad in the first place if needed).

Biology already figured out how to grow organs from one cell. When will we?

Too complicated? Too hard?

Where's the 21st century equivalent of "we choose to do these things not because they are easy, but because they are hard"?


Why not just create clone embryos of yourself and hatch one when the previous version of your genome dies?
 
2013-12-04 11:34:23 PM

uber humper: Didn't read the whole article but isn't this the way a heart/lung machine has worked for the last couple decades?


For less than six hours and taking up about a space about the size of your washer and dryer in an average house, yeah.
 
2013-12-04 11:37:52 PM
Elective heart "upgrades" common in 25 years. I'll get one. If my lungs last that long.
 
2013-12-04 11:45:47 PM

hardinparamedic: uber humper: Didn't read the whole article but isn't this the way a heart/lung machine has worked for the last couple decades?

For less than six hours and taking up about a space about the size of your washer and dryer in an average house, yeah.


The time limits are mostly imposed by the fact that the "pump" in heart-lung bypass machines is nothing more than rollers that compress the tubing and force blood through it to circulate.  The problem is the crushing action of the rollers damages red blood cells continually, and over long periods of time can cause serious issues with clotting, or diminished oxygenation of tissues.

Hearts are pretty amazing pieces of equipment..
 
2013-12-04 11:58:54 PM
"The blades on this BiVACOR device rotate an average of 2,000 times per minute, pushing blood throughout the body without creating a pulse."

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-12-04 11:59:36 PM

uber humper: I read this article in a two year old Popular  Mechanics at the barbershop the other day.

Didn't read the whole article but isn't this the way a heart/lung machine has worked for the last couple decades?


I'm pretty sure I read it in Popular Science, including the part about testing it in cows. Here it is: Link
 
2013-12-05 12:04:44 AM

AttawaYawattA: Quantum Apostrophe: What a load of 19th century Steampunk crap.

You know what I want?

Stempunk.

Grow a real, biological organ from the person's DNA, (repairing the bad code that let the heart go bad in the first place if needed).

Biology already figured out how to grow organs from one cell. When will we?

Too complicated? Too hard?

Where's the 21st century equivalent of "we choose to do these things not because they are easy, but because they are hard"?

Why not just create clone embryos of yourself and hatch one when the previous version of your genome dies?


Ah, a Venture Bros fan?
 
2013-12-05 12:09:06 AM

AttawaYawattA: Quantum Apostrophe: What a load of 19th century Steampunk crap.

You know what I want?

Stempunk.

Grow a real, biological organ from the person's DNA, (repairing the bad code that let the heart go bad in the first place if needed).

Biology already figured out how to grow organs from one cell. When will we?

Too complicated? Too hard?

Where's the 21st century equivalent of "we choose to do these things not because they are easy, but because they are hard"?

Why not just create clone embryos of yourself and hatch one when the previous version of your genome dies?


img2.imagesbn.com
 
2013-12-05 01:32:58 AM
Fix the cigarette lighter.
 
2013-12-05 01:35:43 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: What a load of 19th century Steampunk crap.

You know what I want?

Stempunk.

Grow a real, biological organ from the person's DNA, (repairing the bad code that let the heart go bad in the first place if needed).

Biology already figured out how to grow organs from one cell. When will we?

Too complicated? Too hard?

Where's the 21st century equivalent of "we choose to do these things not because they are easy, but because they are hard"?


Wouldn't it be faster to 3D-Print the new organ using DNA specific 'bioprinting', incorporating the changes you suggested?

/ducks
 
2013-12-05 02:10:49 AM

Brainsick: Wouldn't it be faster to 3D-Print the new organ using DNA specific 'bioprinting', incorporating the changes you suggested?


Yes, clearly that's what was missing from our fabulous biotech future. Not understanding how cells work. No, the pastry bag on a stepper motor, that's the key. That's what deserves the focus.

Now don't forget to conflate this technology with all the other 3D printing technologies so it sounds like one magical technology does it all. At home.

What's with the bizarre cartoon in your bio? It's not funny and makes no sense. And why would "acide" be printed upside-down on the container?
 
2013-12-05 02:23:55 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: What's with the bizarre cartoon in your bio? It's not funny and makes no sense.


Asked and answered.

Quantum Apostrophe: Now don't forget to conflate this technology with all the other 3D printing technologies so it sounds like one magical technology does it all. At home.


Admitting to multiple applications for the demon 3d printing?! You're making progress

Quantum Apostrophe: Yes, clearly that's what was missing from our fabulous biotech future. Not understanding how cells work.


FTLA:
This technology uses bioink, which is a combination of human cells and biodegradable gel. He has researched this method of "growing" organs since 1998.
 
2013-12-05 02:45:52 AM
img.fark.net(click for video)
 
2013-12-05 02:50:32 AM
Organ scaffolding using your own cells. No rejection, it's essentially your heart, and there's zero scaling or compatibility issues.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=18023493

There's always been a fetish for mechanical hearts, the body in the end goes 'meh, don't really want' and you end up dead. We didn't get there with Jarvik, I don't see how this is going to be helpful.
 
2013-12-05 02:52:53 AM

Znuh: Organ scaffolding using your own cells. No rejection, it's essentially your heart, and there's zero scaling or compatibility issues.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=18023493

There's always been a fetish for mechanical hearts, the body in the end goes 'meh, don't really want' and you end up dead. We didn't get there with Jarvik, I don't see how this is going to be helpful.


Well, nobody thinks much about the VHS and BetaMax war.  One won, one did not.  And it doesn't matter because Netflix.

So the moral of the story is do both just because and later on we can stream a new heart over the internet.

I may have been drinking.
 
2013-12-05 03:46:20 AM

Znuh: Organ scaffolding using your own cells. No rejection, it's essentially your heart, and there's zero scaling or compatibility issues.


This!

I will likely need a transplant or some other option within the next ~20 years (harsh congenital VSDs), so I've been following the various up-and-coming technologies.  Currently my ideal replacement tech would be as follows:

- ability to reverse-engineer organ scaffolds (using something like the slices done for the Visible Human Project?)
- known-to-be-great heart scaffold templates stored in some international database
- custom scaffolding 3D-printed for me (using some new 3D printer that can print using suitable scaffolding material), scaled to the right size
- ability to take my own [?] cells and convert them to stem cells of a suitable type
- ability to take said own stem cells and use them to grow new heart on custom 3D-printed scaffolding

No organ rejection.  No scaling issues.  No congenital issues.

// And yes, I would pay more to upgrade from the "stock" scaffold to a scaffold of a 15-year-old marathon runner's heart...
 
2013-12-05 04:05:28 AM
Squik2:
// And yes, I would pay more to upgrade from the "stock" scaffold to a scaffold of a 15-year-old marathon runner's heart...

Driver not found. Restart in Cardiac Arrest mode? Y/N
 
2013-12-05 04:07:27 AM
No. That's the new WRX waste gate. It makes the car sound like it's missing even more.
 
2013-12-05 04:11:34 AM
It's an air pump out of a 1972 Mazda RX-2, used for emissions control.
 
2013-12-05 04:51:02 AM
It's a streetlight.
 
2013-12-05 06:55:22 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: Biology already figured out how to grow organs from one cell. When will we?


Biology figured out how to do that as part of a complete organism. Shall we raise a clone for spare parts and hack them up as needed?
 
2013-12-05 07:03:16 AM

Znuh: Organ scaffolding using your own cells. No rejection, it's essentially your heart, and there's zero scaling or compatibility issues.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=18023493

There's always been a fetish for mechanical hearts, the body in the end goes 'meh, don't really want' and you end up dead. We didn't get there with Jarvik, I don't see how this is going to be helpful.


The main problem isn't rejection, its stress/damage to blood cells. Its still possible in theory to build a mechanical heart that will last for years.
 
2013-12-05 07:07:51 AM

Cpl.D: Znuh: Organ scaffolding using your own cells. No rejection, it's essentially your heart, and there's zero scaling or compatibility issues.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=18023493

There's always been a fetish for mechanical hearts, the body in the end goes 'meh, don't really want' and you end up dead. We didn't get there with Jarvik, I don't see how this is going to be helpful.

Well, nobody thinks much about the VHS and BetaMax war.  One won, one did not.  And it doesn't matter because Netflix.

So the moral of the story is do both just because and later on we can stream a new heart over the internet.

I may have been drinking.


Maybe I can translate: Suppose it takes 9 months to engineer and grow you a new heart but you need a replacement now. Voila, temporary mechanical pump.

Someone somewhere still has a betamax. My Dad bought 8-tracks and a Coleco Adam but he never bought one of those.
 
2013-12-05 09:03:54 AM
So instead of a screw the inventor used magnetic bearings and two single vane pumps also activated by the bearings magnetic field?  Guessing on the vane from the device has a large and small blade on opposing sides of the rotor. The small blade pushes blood through the heart's right chamber, to the lungs, and the larger blade pumps out blood through the left chamber to the rest of the body

Interesting.  Are the vanes centrifical or sprung or elastimer/flex?
 
2013-12-05 10:37:16 AM
Does it go ta-pocketa-pocketa-pocketa ?
 
2013-12-05 12:28:37 PM

Znuh: There's always been a fetish for mechanical hearts, the body in the end goes 'meh, don't really want' and you end up dead. We didn't get there with Jarvik, I don't see how this is going to be helpful.


That's not really true. People have been living close to half a decade with no ill effects from modern LVAD placement, and in many cases it's allowing the heart to recover so much that a transplant is not even necessary. And the current life expectancy of an artificial heart placement is 18 months, limited by mechanical and clotting factors - not rejection.
 
d3
2013-12-05 12:46:51 PM

Tobin_Lam: uber humper: I read this article in a two year old Popular  Mechanics at the barbershop the other day.

Didn't read the whole article but isn't this the way a heart/lung machine has worked for the last couple decades?

I'm pretty sure I read it in Popular Science, including the part about testing it in cows. Here it is: Link


I swear I read a story like this from Britain over  decade ago in Reader's Digest. They tested it on a young girl who was having heart failure due to a viral infection. She went for months with the thing inside her keeping her alive but no heartbeat. Then after the infection had run its course and the heart had healed, they took it out and restarted her original heart.
 
2013-12-05 11:03:39 PM
That is the "Crazy Ivan"  Magnetohydrodynamic "caterpillar" circulatory drive inspired by the submarine Red October.
 
2013-12-06 12:21:12 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Biology already figured out how to grow organs from one cell. When will we?


Boy do you know know much about genetics or embryology.  Just like you fail to understand engineering, computers, general science and just about everything else you spout off about.
 
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