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(Financial Post)   Dreaming of working from home? Not in this economy, snowflake. Now get to work. It's two hours away, depending on traffic   (business.financialpost.com) divider line 86
    More: Interesting, Rogers Communications, traffic, economy  
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2385 clicks; posted to Geek » on 03 Dec 2013 at 10:18 AM (38 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-03 10:21:34 AM
Yup.

/DC Metro
 
2013-12-03 10:21:42 AM
Dreaming of working from home? Not in this economy, snowflake.

FTFY, Subby.  Wait one...

Dreaming of working from home getting paid? Not in this economy, snowflake.  Now get to work. It's two hours away, depending on traffic .

FTFM.  At least the unemployed have free time.  Wage slavery is much more fun...
 
2013-12-03 10:24:42 AM
I work in a satellite office with the main group several hundred miles away. Working from home? What's the difference? My work gets done all the same.

See this pile of work? They know whether I do it or not. They don't seem to care *where* it gets done.
 
2013-12-03 10:30:37 AM
My old boss hooked me up with a laptop and two sets of docking stations/keyboards/monitors so I could work from home as well.

Of course, his idea of working from home was all the extra time outside of office hours that I would work.

He is a serious asshole.  That's the only time in my life that I quit a job with no idea what I was going to do.
 
2013-12-03 10:33:42 AM
I'm working at home right now so I'm getting a kick...
 
2013-12-03 10:36:19 AM
I quit my job over two years ago, after getting my hours cut to 32/week, then with talk of maybe going to three day work weeks. So I left to go out on my own. I'm working in my garage now and I'm doing alright. It was a very slow start but now things are picking up. Working in the building industry in Florida, what could go wrong?
 
2013-12-03 10:39:13 AM

StopLurkListen: I work in a satellite office with the main group several hundred miles away. Working from home? What's the difference? My work gets done all the same.

See this pile of work? They know whether I do it or not. They don't seem to care *where* it gets done.


I'm in almost the exact same situation. Only 5 people in our office, but the main office a state away has hundreds.

I did get to work from home for for the last 4 months during a project that had me getting up very early to accommodate the East coast time. That was nice. But yeah, they wouldn't know if I were in the office or not. Work gets done either way.
 
2013-12-03 10:40:48 AM
World will have to be crashing down around me before I commute ever again.
 
2013-12-03 10:43:21 AM
The way I work and live is superior to the way everyone else works and lives.
I call people 'snowflake.'
My hobbies are done with sincerity and that makes me better than you.
My bitterness fuels me.
 
2013-12-03 10:45:58 AM
Working at home isn't practical because the software and hardware that is used is far beyond what a laptop or personal computer can handle.
 
2013-12-03 10:46:29 AM
As someone "working" from home right now (due to the Metro-North derailment), getting a kick, etc.
 
2013-12-03 10:47:35 AM
That is why I turned down jobs that would pay me more. I can either spend 3-4 hours a day commuting to work or get paid a little less and work 10 minutes away from home, the ability to work from home when needed, and flexible hours when I have to be in the office.

I am at a secure enough level, that the extra money doesn't mean as much as actually having a life outside of work and travel to and fro.
 
2013-12-03 10:50:17 AM
I work from home; it's awesome.

That's not terribly constructive, I guess. But I'm pretty happy with it, so that's nice.
 
2013-12-03 10:53:17 AM
I work from home. What's the big deal. Get good enough at anything and you can consult and work from wherever you like. Mind you, it's not like turning on a tap. I worked for over a decade with very specific goals to get to this point.

Yay for the tech industry!
 
2013-12-03 10:53:23 AM
Unless I am on a client site, I am working from home. Luckily I don't have to travel to clients nearly as often as I used to. Now it's mostly just project kickoffs and final sprints. Not much use in being onsite specific to the work being done, and clients finally realized that picking up airfare and hotels for a week doesn't really pay off that much. Yeah the face-to-face relationships don't develop as much, but these are short term projects more often than not (2-3 months).

But yes, if you have the skillset, working from home. A friend of mine, in the last 2 years, has done 3 jobs/projects remotely. It was contract work with benefits, which isn't for everyone, but he got hired with 1-2 weeks of starting to look for his next job.
 
2013-12-03 10:56:38 AM
I occasionally work from home, but the office is only like 15 minutes away, and the kid's daycare is in between the home and office. I'm doin just fine.

/Did the "1 hour or 4 hours, depending" commute into DC for two years.
//Damn near killed me.
 
2013-12-03 11:04:06 AM
If you push papers and do "computer work" you probably aren't doing any productive work.
 
2013-12-03 11:05:58 AM
I'd say it depends on the management style of your company and your work ethic.  Some old-school managers don't trust anyone they can't see on a daily basis grinding away at their desk.

If you are fortunate, you'll get a manager that just wants the work done, and it doesn't matter if it is at home or in the office.

Where I work now I did have to prove myself, that I could do the work from home and still continue to run projects remotely.
 
2013-12-03 11:07:44 AM

robertus: /Did the "1 hour or 4 hours, depending" commute into DC for two years.


I don't think I ever had a commute go up to 4 hours, unless there was a really bad wreck; but when I lived in southern Florida, the *minimum* time for my commute was about 90 minutes.  Yuck.  Now I have an office job that's 10 minutes from home, and I live in Maine.
 
2013-12-03 11:09:22 AM
I've been working from my home for over 20 years now.

Thinking of going into the office makes me cringe (which I have to do now and then)...

I've done service work, sales work and have been a manager of staff of 10 guys across the western United States from the Mississippi River to L.A. California. Working from home requires two things: discipline and a healthy dose of self-starterism. The reality is most people aren't cut out for this and are better off in the structured environment of an office. I'm so much more productive when not in the office, but I know most folks would be dicking around on Fark or something if they didn't have their manager checking in on them now and then.

I love making my own schedule, getting out and seeing my customers / colleagues / employees when they need me and being able to go to my kid's Parent/Teacher conferences.

/ Not Lazy
// More productive
 
2013-12-03 11:10:16 AM

Famous Thamas: I'd say it depends on the management style of your company and your work ethic.  Some old-school managers don't trust anyone they can't see on a daily basis grinding away at their desk.

If you are fortunate, you'll get a manager that just wants the work done, and it doesn't matter if it is at home or in the office.

Where I work now I did have to prove myself, that I could do the work from home and still continue to run projects remotely.


This. Working in IT permits a little more flexibility given that most of our work is done remotely now, to the point that I don't envy the pressure that it must put on management to hire the right types of people, i.e. ones that can "handle" working from home.
 
2013-12-03 11:10:32 AM

Famous Thamas: I'd say it depends on the management style of your company and your work ethic.  Some old-school managers don't trust anyone they can't see on a daily basis grinding away at their desk.

If you are fortunate, you'll get a manager that just wants the work done, and it doesn't matter if it is at home or in the office.

Where I work now I did have to prove myself, that I could do the work from home and still continue to run projects remotely.


I would like to think that people would be more productive at home, but yeah, the aforementioned "if you're not hunkered forward in a cube, etc you must not be getting anything done" seems to be where I end up :(
 
2013-12-03 11:10:59 AM
I'm not sure why employers in areas suitable for teleworking are against it - it saves having to provide office space for the employees and gives a more flexibility when the office size needs to be either increased or reduced.
 
2013-12-03 11:12:44 AM

Target Builder: I'm not sure why employers in areas suitable for teleworking are against it - it saves having to provide office space for the employees and gives a more flexibility when the office size needs to be either increased or reduced.


Because god forbid we have happy, productive employees in a city like Atlanta where long, traffic-snarled commutes are the norm.
 
2013-12-03 11:14:20 AM
I work from home. Have for several years. When I do have to go in to do some work, it's about an 8 mile commute.

I used to play the rat race, Bay Area and D.C. traffic game. Don't miss it in the slightest.
 
2013-12-03 11:15:47 AM

Target Builder: I'm not sure why employers in areas suitable for teleworking are against it - it saves having to provide office space for the employees and gives a more flexibility when the office size needs to be either increased or reduced.


Study after study shows telecommuters are happier, save the company money AND work more hours.

The uber-efficient free market ignores these things? I'm shocked!
 
2013-12-03 11:18:40 AM

Target Builder: I'm not sure why employers in areas suitable for teleworking are against it - it saves having to provide office space for the employees and gives a more flexibility when the office size needs to be either increased or reduced.


In an age where slapping the "Green" moniker on anything is common and desirable, I don't know why businesses aren't quicker to push the idea of working from home, for the purpose of putting their own "green company" spin on it. It would be so easy. "Our employees drive xx% less, creating xx times less carbon..etc.  Our offices require x% less electricity. Our employees are x-fold happier working fo rus, and feel like their life/work balance is more manageable."

Any company not spinning that in their favor is foolish, imo. It's low hanging fruit.
 
2013-12-03 11:21:36 AM
Oh, for a company? Unless you've got something interesting I'm not interested in working for you. Now, if you offer me something interesting and well compensated I might deal with traffic. If I wanted a boring grind I'd work harder at what I do by and for myself, where I currently work to the point of diminishing returns.
 
2013-12-03 11:29:44 AM
Wait, 50% of people who want their own office space get it, and 46% of people don't feel they need to meet face to face to get things done, and these odds mean you should just give up now?
 
2013-12-03 11:42:55 AM

mediablitz: Target Builder: I'm not sure why employers in areas suitable for teleworking are against it - it saves having to provide office space for the employees and gives a more flexibility when the office size needs to be either increased or reduced.

Study after study shows telecommuters are happier, save the company money AND work more hours.

The uber-efficient free market ignores these things? I'm shocked!


Because we can't have happy employees; they have to be subjected to the miserable grind of a commute and a cubicle.
 
2013-12-03 11:54:58 AM

pxlboy: mediablitz: Target Builder: I'm not sure why employers in areas suitable for teleworking are against it - it saves having to provide office space for the employees and gives a more flexibility when the office size needs to be either increased or reduced.

Study after study shows telecommuters are happier, save the company money AND work more hours.

The uber-efficient free market ignores these things? I'm shocked!

Because we can't have happy employees; they have to be subjected to the miserable grind of a commute and a cubicle.


I think it has more to do with the fact that upper management in most businesses is still old guys 50+... many of whom would probably offer no real value to the company if they didn't have employees to "manage" by wandering around and looming over their shoulders to make sure there is something that looks like "work" on the screen.
 
2013-12-03 11:58:40 AM
As a boss, my mantra is simple: family and your health come first. Unless you're working at the Pentagon (and even that is iffy) there's no work so important that it should make your life less enjoyable.

All my folks are set up with access to our shared drive at home.

So, if your kid is sick, or you've got contractors in, or there's a project you're working on that means you need uninterrupted free time, or you've got a PD day ... work from home.

Hell, work from home just because you want a break, if you want. Just give me two day's notice and don't complain if there's something that i really need you to be in the office for, that day (which is unusual).

The result is that my office morale is GREAT (i have zero turnover), people don't take advantage of the system, productivity is awesome and we've won several industry awards. Obviously, telecommuting doesn't work in every industry, but in ours it does ... so why not take advantage?

Our Christmas Party this year involves going to a super-hipster place and throwing axes, then hitting a bar.

Work doesn't HAVE to suck.  The problem is insecure, trumped-up, petty little autocratic bosses who MAKE work suck.
 
2013-12-03 12:01:40 PM

towatchoverme: Work doesn't HAVE to suck.  The problem is insecure, trumped-up, petty little autocratic bosses who MAKE work suck


Your laid back and responsible approach to work life is preventing people from getting jobs in your office to replace the people that quit out of stress.
 
2013-12-03 12:03:58 PM

miscreant: pxlboy: mediablitz: Target Builder: I'm not sure why employers in areas suitable for teleworking are against it - it saves having to provide office space for the employees and gives a more flexibility when the office size needs to be either increased or reduced.

Study after study shows telecommuters are happier, save the company money AND work more hours.

The uber-efficient free market ignores these things? I'm shocked!

Because we can't have happy employees; they have to be subjected to the miserable grind of a commute and a cubicle.

I think it has more to do with the fact that upper management in most businesses is still old guys 50+... many of whom would probably offer no real value to the company if they didn't have employees to "manage" by wandering around and looming over their shoulders to make sure there is something that looks like "work" on the screen.


As a 51 year old who is self employed and works from home (and has for years), I find this reply hilarious.

Not inaccurate, just hilarious.
 
kab
2013-12-03 12:09:25 PM

StopLurkListen: I work in a satellite office with the main group several hundred miles away. Working from home? What's the difference? My work gets done all the same.

See this pile of work? They know whether I do it or not. They don't seem to care *where* it gets done.


Very much this.
 
2013-12-03 12:19:49 PM
I live 2 minutes away from work, 1.5 if I hit the light correctly at the intersection right by my house, but that doth not often happen.

/I usually walk and it takes 20 minutes...
 
2013-12-03 12:22:19 PM

mrlewish: If you push papers and do "computer work" you probably aren't doing any productive work.


Some of us make software, you know.  We make things.  (and post on fark).
 
2013-12-03 12:26:43 PM
Been in both situations:  Full time remote (managed a team from home) AND driving about 60 miles one way to work.

There's good and bad elements of both.

Pros-Remote:
- Get to work in your PJs if you want (I still don't reccomend, but you can)
- No driving
- All the coffee you can make
- more relaxing environment (unless you have children)
- Can (normally) work around your schedule more easily.
- Fewer distractions
- Staying out of the 'office politics'
- No inter-office gossip
- "nooners" are WAY easier.

Pros-On site:
- Get out of the house (trust me, this is important)
- Work more closely with team
- Face-time with the machines you're working with (for engineering, this is very important)
- Easier to 'bounce ideas around'
- More knowledge about what's going on at the company
- Higher team cohesion
- Easier to find people you need

Cons-Remote:
- You need to get out of the house, or you WILL go crazy.
- Self-discipline is easy to break
- Home life can become a distraction
- possible loneliness issues
- Can be difficult to find someone you may need
- More attentive management is required

Cons-Office:
- "Office Space"...'nuff said
- More attention needs to be paid to appearances
- more distractions
- commutes.  No one likes 'em
- Less flexible for busy families.
- More office politics.
- Managers do as much 'babysitting' as 'managing'.
- bureaucracies thrive in office environments, leading to excess layers.


So in the end, pick your poison.
 
2013-12-03 12:26:56 PM

miscreant: I think it has more to do with the fact that upper management in most businesses is still old guys 50+... many of whom would probably offer no real value to the company if they didn't have employees to "manage" by wandering around and looming over their shoulders to make sure there is something that looks like "work" on the screen.


thats basically my company. how would the 9 layers of mid management justify themselves if they let us work from home? Someone might notice that the work gets done even without their "management" "helping" the employees by standing over their shoulders all day....
 
2013-12-03 12:27:51 PM

ikanreed: mrlewish: If you push papers and do "computer work" you probably aren't doing any productive work.

Some of us make software, you know.  We make things.  (and post on fark).


Software:  Keeping hardware under control since the early 70's.
 
2013-12-03 12:29:46 PM

A Cave Geek: There's good and bad elements of both.


I am glad there is someone else out there who enjoys the same lovely gray world I live in.
 
2013-12-03 12:40:03 PM

miscreant: I think it has more to do with the fact that upper management in most businesses is still old guys 50+... many of whom would probably offer no real value to the company if they didn't have employees to "manage" by wandering around and looming over their shoulders to make sure there is something that looks like "work" on the screen.


My company has a mini war going on over WFH. For a lot of years WFH was the norm, and your boss had to prove you needed to be in the office. Many reorgs and acquisitions later, we now have an old guard trying to pull us back into the office. Only problem is our head count has become more than we have cubicles to accommodate. We also have a lot of extremely talented people that do not live within commuting distance to any of our facilities.

It all started when Yahoo pulled people back into the office. Hopefully this crap blows over soon. I don't feel like changing jobs, but I know the other bank in town will let me WFH.
 
2013-12-03 12:40:55 PM
Not only do I work from home, but I moved 2000+ miles away from the office and kept my job.

/trust is earned, just like respect
//I get so much more work done
///I miss my fellow employees. :(
 
2013-12-03 12:44:59 PM
The survey found that 21% would prefer to work in an open concept while 18% would consider a "flexible workstation.

Either these people are idiots or HR and Finance are answering those questions.  Who the hell wants to "hot rack" their desk with the guy who has Chipotle for lunch everyday...or worse?
 
2013-12-03 12:46:47 PM

sammyk: My company has a mini war going on over WFH. For a lot of years WFH was the norm, and your boss had to prove you needed to be in the office. Many reorgs and acquisitions later, we now have an old guard trying to pull us back into the office. Only problem is our head count has become more than we have cubicles to accommodate. We also have a lot of extremely talented people that do not live within commuting distance to any of our facilities.

It all started when Yahoo pulled people back into the office. Hopefully this crap blows over soon. I don't feel like changing jobs, but I know the other bank in town will let me WFH.


I work from home, but I am literally the ONLY "employee" (actually a contractor) allowed to do so, and only because I was essentially grandfathered in when the original startup I worked for got bought. The rest of the original IT team got let go and replaced by local tech guys. I was supposed to be replaced as well, but figured I'd just work from home for them until they hired somebody for me to train to replace me. Six years later and I'm by far the tech guy who's been with the project for the longest.
 
2013-12-03 12:47:04 PM

AngryDragon: The survey found that 21% would prefer to work in an open concept while 18% would consider a "flexible workstation.

Either these people are idiots or HR and Finance are answering those questions.  Who the hell wants to "hot rack" their desk with the guy who has Chipotle for lunch everyday...or worse?


Probably based off of some loaded internal HR generated 'survey'.

Never met an HR worker who added any real value to a company.
 
2013-12-03 12:49:34 PM

miscreant: sammyk: My company has a mini war going on over WFH. For a lot of years WFH was the norm, and your boss had to prove you needed to be in the office. Many reorgs and acquisitions later, we now have an old guard trying to pull us back into the office. Only problem is our head count has become more than we have cubicles to accommodate. We also have a lot of extremely talented people that do not live within commuting distance to any of our facilities.

It all started when Yahoo pulled people back into the office. Hopefully this crap blows over soon. I don't feel like changing jobs, but I know the other bank in town will let me WFH.

I work from home, but I am literally the ONLY "employee" (actually a contractor) allowed to do so, and only because I was essentially grandfathered in when the original startup I worked for got bought. The rest of the original IT team got let go and replaced by local tech guys. I was supposed to be replaced as well, but figured I'd just work from home for them until they hired somebody for me to train to replace me. Six years later and I'm by far the tech guy who's been with the project for the longest.


Jesus what kind of project is that?
 
2013-12-03 01:02:16 PM
The new chief executive of Rogers Communications Inc. has mused loudly about what he thinks of conventional office space. "I don't believe in offices. They're a thing of the past. Offices produce things like a conventional company,

So Mr. CEO has a cubicle across from the mens room then?
 
2013-12-03 01:09:08 PM

redmid17: Jesus what kind of project is that?


Sorry, should say application, not project. Lots and lots of projects during that time. Our tech manager though doesn't see value in keeping good people around. He told me once that developers needed to be like "cogs in a machine, easily replaceable"... so needless to say, we've got lots of turn over. Nobody has stuck around long enough to replace me. I only stick around because I get to work from home. If they tried to make me come into the office... well, first of all I'd have to move since I'm in a different city, and I'd quit first anyway.
 
2013-12-03 01:12:43 PM
Tellecommunting is one thing.

The real telling part is the shrinking workspace within the offices themselves. 25% less area per person. They are warehousing people more and more.

The days of a 6x6 cube are ending. now they want you at a 60"x30" desk all lined up in a row next to other desks like school children. They call it "Benching" Maybe its cool if you have a data-entry job, but its a nightmare for people in sales or anything else where everyone in the room is on the phone a lot.

And, of course, the management still gets their 200 SqFt office suites.

This
www.cubicles.com

Is now this
remingtongroup.com


just keep crammin them in there.
 
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