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(NPR)   Comet ISON is no more. It has ceased to be. It's expired and gone to meet its maker. It's a stiff. THIS IS AN EX-COMET   (npr.org ) divider line
    More: Sad, comets, Comet ISON, Oort cloud, solar winds, NASA, Karl Battams  
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3280 clicks; posted to Geek » on 02 Dec 2013 at 6:11 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-02 05:49:26 PM  
What is this, the third thread on ISON being obliterated? Hey mods, yeah we know.
 
2013-12-02 06:01:14 PM  
Nonsense... it's just pinin' for the Oorts
 
2013-12-02 06:06:13 PM  
Ex-comet of the century!
 
2013-12-02 06:13:15 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: Ex-comet of the century!


Well, we better replace it, then.
 
2013-12-02 06:16:47 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Nonsense... it's just pinin' for the Oorts


goddammit
 
2013-12-02 06:19:48 PM  
That was a secondary comet, that wasnt the ISON comet! The video clearly shows it going up, and to the left. Study it out people.
 
2013-12-02 06:25:19 PM  
It's just resting.
 
2013-12-02 06:29:16 PM  
A seconds ISON has not hit the southern tower
 
2013-12-02 06:33:28 PM  
Lisbon observatory predicted this, and claimed Earth would be showered in fragments.
 
2013-12-02 06:42:47 PM  

jigger: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Nonsense... it's just pinin' for the Oorts

goddammit


goddamit x2
 
2013-12-02 06:59:09 PM  
Norway better watch out in case it really is pining for the fjords.
 
2013-12-02 07:00:24 PM  
Subby you magnificent bastard, take a can of spam out of petty cash....err spam?
 
2013-12-02 07:11:20 PM  
imgs.xkcd.com

/obligatory.
 
2013-12-02 07:24:29 PM  
ISON, I am disappoint.
 
2013-12-02 07:29:10 PM  

grimlock1972: Subby you magnificent bastard, take a can of spam out of petty cash....err spam?


I DON'T LIKE SPAM!
 
2013-12-02 07:31:46 PM  
Bye bye, Big Comet ISON
Miss you in the saddest fashion
Bye bye, Big Comet ISON
You're 5 million candles in the solar wind
 
KIA
2013-12-02 07:38:38 PM  

J. Frank Parnell: Lisbon observatory predicted this, and claimed Earth would be showered in fragments.


Yeah, what was that scientific rule about matter again?  Shiat goes somewhere?  I think that was it.
 
2013-12-02 07:44:49 PM  
Fargin ice whole... Not.
 
2013-12-02 07:49:42 PM  
That tribute....It's.....It's......

assets.diylol.com

/Battams put the stellar into interstellar.
 
2013-12-02 07:50:40 PM  

FTA

ISON retreated to the Oort Cloud, where it maintained a largely reclusive existence for nearly four billion years. But around 3-million B.C., a chance encounter with a passing star coerced ISON...

A star passing through the Oort cloud?
 
2013-12-02 07:58:22 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Nonsense... it's just pinin' for the Oorts


Magnificent.
 
2013-12-02 08:07:21 PM  

KIA: Yeah, what was that scientific rule about matter again? Shiat goes somewhere? I think that was it.


shiat in motion tends to stay in motion unless acted upon by some external shiat?

But the comet would have been a clear miss, and now we might have a large cloud of fragments, some the size of buildings, heading for us. Which improves the chances of disastrous impact significantly.

If something like that does happen, and NASA is all "we had no idea this was going to happen" or waits until the very last minute to say anything about it at all, i hope everyone loses faith in them entirely. No amount of funding can fix that level of incompetence. If a layman like me can see a very possible threat, then there's just no hope for them.

What people could do with adequate warning, is move the hell away from the shorelines, because any large ocean impact will create tsunamis unlike anything we've seen in modern times. Any large impact on land, even though it would be disastrous, would be much more contained.

I really hope it's nothing, because i happen to live near the shore. Wish some authority would speak the fark up about it to put me at ease, and soon.

/in before "Hey relax, guy. The universe is a perfectly safe place that is not indifferent to life"
 
2013-12-02 08:09:17 PM  

OnlyM3: FTA
ISON retreated to the Oort Cloud, where it maintained a largely reclusive existence for nearly four billion years. But around 3-million B.C., a chance encounter with a passing star coerced ISON...
A star passing through the Oort cloud?


The Oort cloud is pretty damn big (about a light year or two across), it doesn't take much of a disturbance to set things in motion, and stars have really big gravity wells, and they come whizzing on by often enough, often coming well within a radius distance from the outer Oort Cloud.  Which means that as they come in, the outer fringes of the cloud facing the star are nearly equidistant with or even closer to the passing star than they are to the Sun, maybe even coming into contact with their Oort cloud if they have one.
 
2013-12-02 08:10:16 PM  

OnlyM3: FTA
ISON retreated to the Oort Cloud, where it maintained a largely reclusive existence for nearly four billion years. But around 3-million B.C., a chance encounter with a passing star coerced ISON...
A star passing through the Oort cloud?


No, just passing near enough to yank on the comet. It doesn't take much. Comets in the Oort cloud are stupendously far from the sun.
 
2013-12-02 08:21:08 PM  

OnlyM3: FTA
ISON retreated to the Oort Cloud, where it maintained a largely reclusive existence for nearly four billion years. But around 3-million B.C., a chance encounter with a passing star coerced ISON...
A star passing through the Oort cloud?


Might find this interesting. Not sure what to make of it, myself. Naturally the Nibiru people are all excited.
 
2013-12-02 08:26:36 PM  

OnlyM3: A star passing through the Oort cloud?


The suns grasp on objects in the Ort Cloud is very, shall we say tenacious. Their orbits (one full revolution around the sun) can be measured in about 6.5 centuries on average (or roughly 4 orbits of Neptune to 1 average orbit of an object in the Ort cloud). This means that a star the same size as our sun can "Nudge" objects in the Ort Cloud first away from our sun and then it's (now elliptical) orbit eventually causes the object to plunge into the inner solar system. The more massive the object that does the nudging is the farther away it can be. It's also been postulated that rogue planets the size of Jupiter are the cause of these nudges which is why we don't see any passing stars doing this. Another theory is that as we bob up and down in the Milky Ways galactic plane, that the change in movement at the top and bottom of that sine wave like motion causes several objects in the Ort Cloud to shake loose every 25k years or so.
 
2013-12-02 08:27:20 PM  
Yes, the Earth might go through the remants of ISON. No, it's not expected to be dangerous.

"For several days around January 12, 2014, Earth will pass through a stream of fine-grained debris from Comet ISON," says Wiegert. "The resulting shower could have some interesting properties.

According to Wiegert's computer models, the debris stream is populated with extremely tiny grains of dust, no more than a few microns wide, pushed toward Earth by the gentle radiation pressure of the sun. They will be hitting at a speed of 56 km/s or 125,000 mph. Because the particles are so small, Earth's upper atmosphere will rapidly slow them to a stop.

"Instead of burning up in a flash of light, they will drift gently down to the Earth below," he says.
Don't expect to notice. The invisible rain of comet dust, if it occurs, would be very slow. It can take months or even years for fine dust to settle out of the high atmosphere.

While the dust is "up there," it could produce noctilucent clouds (NLCs).

NLCs are icy clouds that glow electric-blue as they float more than 80 km above Earth's poles. Recent data from NASA's AIM spacecraft suggests that NLCs are seeded by space dust. Tiny meteoroids act as nucleating points where water molecules gather; the resulting ice crystals assemble into clouds at the edge of space itself.

Bill Cooke, lead scientist at NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office, says there's little danger to Earth-orbiting spacecraft. "These particles are just too small to penetrate the walls of our satellites, and they don't stand a chance against the heavy shielding of the ISS." However, he adds, mission operators will be alert around January 12th for possible anomalies. "
 
2013-12-02 08:30:01 PM  

zerkalo: jigger: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Nonsense... it's just pinin' for the Oorts

goddammit

goddamit x2


goddammit x3
 
2013-12-02 08:31:17 PM  
Noctilucent clouds:
www.nasa.gov
 
2013-12-02 08:50:18 PM  

CygnusDarius: ell, we better replace it, then.


Sorry squire, we're right out of comets...
 
2013-12-02 08:57:32 PM  
ISON was a comet
But ISON's now just mist
What it thought was solar wind
Was CHUCK NORRIS' FIST.
 
2013-12-02 09:27:27 PM  

J. Frank Parnell: KIA: Yeah, what was that scientific rule about matter again? Shiat goes somewhere? I think that was it.

shiat in motion tends to stay in motion unless acted upon by some external shiat?

But the comet would have been a clear miss, and now we might have a large cloud of fragments, some the size of buildings, heading for us. Which improves the chances of disastrous impact significantly.

If something like that does happen, and NASA is all "we had no idea this was going to happen" or waits until the very last minute to say anything about it at all, i hope everyone loses faith in them entirely. No amount of funding can fix that level of incompetence. If a layman like me can see a very possible threat, then there's just no hope for them.

What people could do with adequate warning, is move the hell away from the shorelines, because any large ocean impact will create tsunamis unlike anything we've seen in modern times. Any large impact on land, even though it would be disastrous, would be much more contained.

I really hope it's nothing, because i happen to live near the shore. Wish some authority would speak the fark up about it to put me at ease, and soon.

/in before "Hey relax, guy. The universe is a perfectly safe place that is not indifferent to life"



Er.... you know that comets are mostly ice right? The reason it broke apart was because the ice melted when it got close to the sun. The remnants are mostly gravel. Even if there is a piece the size of a building, that is not big enough to reach the surface. You need chunks that are Km in size. NASA isn't saying anything because there is nothing to say. The biggest effect we can expect from this on earth is a nice meteor shower if we pass through the remnants.
 
2013-12-02 09:46:48 PM  

J. Frank Parnell: KIA: Yeah, what was that scientific rule about matter again? Shiat goes somewhere? I think that was it.

shiat in motion tends to stay in motion unless acted upon by some external shiat?

But the comet would have been a clear miss, and now we might have a large cloud of fragments, some the size of buildings, heading for us. Which improves the chances of disastrous impact significantly.

If something like that does happen, and NASA is all "we had no idea this was going to happen" or waits until the very last minute to say anything about it at all, i hope everyone loses faith in them entirely. No amount of funding can fix that level of incompetence. If a layman like me can see a very possible threat, then there's just no hope for them.

What people could do with adequate warning, is move the hell away from the shorelines, because any large ocean impact will create tsunamis unlike anything we've seen in modern times. Any large impact on land, even though it would be disastrous, would be much more contained.

I really hope it's nothing, because i happen to live near the shore. Wish some authority would speak the fark up about it to put me at ease, and soon.

/in before "Hey relax, guy. The universe is a perfectly safe place that is not indifferent to life"


The authorities will not say a thing unless they can spin it into some activity that gives John Q. Public a sense of control. Otherwise, panic will ensue and that will just add more suffering to suffering.
 
2013-12-02 10:09:20 PM  

fatassbastard: CygnusDarius: ell, we better replace it, then.

Sorry squire, we're right out of comets...


I see, I know where you're going with this, have have you got instead?.
 
2013-12-02 10:26:04 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Nonsense... it's just pinin' for the Oorts


Beau'iful plumage!
 
2013-12-02 10:27:39 PM  

Kirk's_Toupee: The authorities will not say a thing unless they can spin it into some activity that gives John Q. Public a sense of control. Otherwise, panic will ensue and that will just add more suffering to suffering.


Certainly. It's uncommon for me to even look to NASA or some authority to tell me what to think regarding something like this, because i prefer to make up my own mind based on the data. But we've been given no real data, and it has me genuinely concerned. Last we have are the images showing it breaking up as it leaves the sun. And you know they have to be watching it.

I hope there's hell to pay if they're staying silent because they don't want to panic people. Could save a lot of lives.
 
2013-12-02 10:36:44 PM  

Radioactive Ass: The suns grasp on objects in the Ort Cloud is very, shall we say tenacious.


No, we shall more properly say "tenuous".

Their orbits (one full revolution around the sun) can be measured in about 6.5 centuries on average (or roughly 4 orbits of Neptune to 1 average orbit of an object in the Ort cloud).

I think you're off by several orders of magnitude.

Neptune's orbital radius is about 30 AU, and its period is about 164 years.

Period is proportional to radius raised to the 3/2 power.

Oort objects orbit at 2K - 20K AU (inner cloud) and 20K - 50K+ AU (outer cloud). So, roughly 100 to 1000 times the distance, giving periods on the order of 100,000 to 500,000 years. If you take the largest estimates of the cloud's size, the "orbital period" of the most distant objects would be in the millions of years -- but they'd complete relatively few "orbits" before passing stars would perturb them into significantly different orbits.

It's very cold and slow out there, and it takes a very long time to fall in from the shell.

Another theory is that as we bob up and down in the Milky Ways galactic plane, that the change in movement at the top and bottom of that sine wave like motion causes several objects in the Ort Cloud to shake loose every 25k years or so.

That's... that's not the way orbits work at all. There isn't something grabbing the Sun and shaking it up and down, while leaving its satellites untouched. They all -- Sun, planets, comets -- are following the same gross trajectory around galactic center-of-mass.
 
2013-12-02 10:49:16 PM  

J. Frank Parnell: Certainly. It's uncommon for me to even look to NASA or some authority to tell me what to think regarding something like this, because i prefer to make up my own mind based on the data. But we've been given no real data, and it has me genuinely concerned. Last we have are the images showing it breaking up as it leaves the sun. And you know they have to be watching it.


The comet disappeared going off that-a-way, along a course that comes nowhere close to Earth. It dispersed. There just isn't any way that even significant fragments of it are going to come close to us -- on the off chance that there are significant fragments of it left.

What you're doing is like watching a semi drive past you, crash through the "Road Closed" sign a quarter-mile down the road, and go off the side of a cliff; watching the cloud of smoke rise and drift off in the wind -- and then cowering in fear because the out-of-control truck might come back up the cliff, back along the road, and hit you. After all, you can't see it, and why should you trust the first responders standing around and looking over the edge?
 
2013-12-02 11:04:33 PM  

jfarkinB: The comet disappeared going off that-a-way, along a course that comes nowhere close to Earth.


You do understand the observation point is based on where the planet is at the moment, right? It went off to the right, but Earth is also orbiting to the right and could meet it if the trajectory wasn't changed. The comet was supposed to pass just above the Earth at a certain point.

If the debris field is following a different trajectory than the comet was predicted to i'd just like to see that confirmed.
 
2013-12-02 11:07:18 PM  
ISON hit a velocity of around 850,000 mph as it passed perigee near the Sun... that's moving. Then it exploded. Paul Walker just got one-upped.

/aisle seat pls
 
2013-12-02 11:10:34 PM  

jfarkinB: J. Frank Parnell: Certainly. It's uncommon for me to even look to NASA or some authority to tell me what to think regarding something like this, because i prefer to make up my own mind based on the data. But we've been given no real data, and it has me genuinely concerned. Last we have are the images showing it breaking up as it leaves the sun. And you know they have to be watching it.

The comet disappeared going off that-a-way, along a course that comes nowhere close to Earth. It dispersed. There just isn't any way that even significant fragments of it are going to come close to us -- on the off chance that there are significant fragments of it left.

What you're doing is like watching a semi drive past you, crash through the "Road Closed" sign a quarter-mile down the road, and go off the side of a cliff; watching the cloud of smoke rise and drift off in the wind -- and then cowering in fear because the out-of-control truck might come back up the cliff, back along the road, and hit you. After all, you can't see it, and why should you trust the first responders standing around and looking over the edge?


Ah, you got there before I could. There's also the difficulty of trying to see a small DARK piece of rock against something as BIG and BRIGHT as the sun. If we COULD detect the shadow against the sun, then I'd probably be more worried because it would mean it's big enough at that distance to cause a wobble in the amount of light we're getting. THAT would be a scary piece of rock. This is just a new meteor shower we get to name at best.

jfarkinB: That's... that's not the way orbits work at all. There isn't something grabbing the Sun and shaking it up and down, while leaving its satellites untouched. They all -- Sun, planets, comets -- are following the same gross trajectory around galactic center-of-mass.


This produced a very hilarious image of what would happen on Terra every time we had an earthquake. . .
 
2013-12-02 11:44:40 PM  

J. Frank Parnell: KIA: Yeah, what was that scientific rule about matter again? Shiat goes somewhere? I think that was it.

shiat in motion tends to stay in motion unless acted upon by some external shiat?

But the comet would have been a clear miss, and now we might have a large cloud of fragments, some the size of buildings, heading for us. Which improves the chances of disastrous impact significantly.

If something like that does happen, and NASA is all "we had no idea this was going to happen" or waits until the very last minute to say anything about it at all, i hope everyone loses faith in them entirely. No amount of funding can fix that level of incompetence. If a layman like me can see a very possible threat, then there's just no hope for them.

What people could do with adequate warning, is move the hell away from the shorelines, because any large ocean impact will create tsunamis unlike anything we've seen in modern times. Any large impact on land, even though it would be disastrous, would be much more contained.

I really hope it's nothing, because i happen to live near the shore. Wish some authority would speak the fark up about it to put me at ease, and soon.

/in before "Hey relax, guy. The universe is a perfectly safe place that is not indifferent to life"


So... canned goods, gold, guns and bibles for all, then?
 
2013-12-02 11:47:13 PM  

Suckmaster Burstingfoam: So... canned goods, gold, guns and bibles for all, then?


Of course. And don't forget the jerky.
 
2013-12-02 11:57:28 PM  
I learnt 30 years ago that it is better for rocks of age to burn out than fade away.  Sad faded end.
 
2013-12-03 12:34:41 AM  

J. Frank Parnell: Kirk's_Toupee: The authorities will not say a thing unless they can spin it into some activity that gives John Q. Public a sense of control. Otherwise, panic will ensue and that will just add more suffering to suffering.

Certainly. It's uncommon for me to even look to NASA or some authority to tell me what to think regarding something like this, because i prefer to make up my own mind based on the data. But we've been given no real data, and it has me genuinely concerned. Last we have are the images showing it breaking up as it leaves the sun. And you know they have to be watching it.

I hope there's hell to pay if they're staying silent because they don't want to panic people. Could save a lot of lives.


It means they are not certain, that's disconcerting. There has been an uptick of fireball sightings. Couple that with the latest announcement stating that meteors are more common than originally thought, well Im concerned. Wary to go full Armageddon mode in case it's a case of chicken little. But, comets are omens for good reasons. I'm interested in the new projectories.
 
2013-12-03 12:58:42 AM  
"I understand that this is ISON."

"Yes?"

"But you told me it was Ipswich."

"It was a pun."

"A pun..?!"

"No, not a pun.  What's that other thing -- that's spelled the same backwards, as forwards..?"

"A palindrome..?"

"Yeah, that's it."

"A palindrome of ISON would be NOSI.  It don't work..!"
 
2013-12-03 03:32:38 AM  
The incredibly small fragments from ISON aren't going to bother you in the slightest. You potentially will get some fun meteor showers, but that's being hopeful.
 
2013-12-03 08:45:04 AM  
Next, on "The Talking Cosmos", Chris is joined by Comet ISON, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Dr. Brian May, and a surprise guest.
 
2013-12-03 09:02:28 AM  

J. Frank Parnell: Kirk's_Toupee: The authorities will not say a thing unless they can spin it into some activity that gives John Q. Public a sense of control. Otherwise, panic will ensue and that will just add more suffering to suffering.

Certainly. It's uncommon for me to even look to NASA or some authority to tell me what to think regarding something like this, because i prefer to make up my own mind based on the data. But we've been given no real data, and it has me genuinely concerned. Last we have are the images showing it breaking up as it leaves the sun. And you know they have to be watching it.

I hope there's hell to pay if they're staying silent because they don't want to panic people. Could save a lot of lives.


Let me guess, you don't trust doctors, either, right?

The comet fragments won't hit the earth, as it was already going past us. The trajectory of any remaining objects (if any are left, which is unlikely given it is made of ice, broke up, and is near  the sun) would have it going in a totally different way. Think of it as throwing a badly packed snowball; the snowball falls apart, and the fragments won't hit you since they are going the other way.

If you want a doomsday conspiracy, you could always imagine that a second comet was also knocked off its trajectory at the same time as ISON and is heading towards us. This one would fool the masses more, but also is not based in fact since the comet took a few orbits before heading into the inner solar system.
 
2013-12-03 09:10:47 AM  
shiat I was looking forward to seeing that.
 
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