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(Washington Post)   Useful: Where Americans talk funny, by region   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 248
    More: Cool, Long Island University, da bears, jelly doughnuts  
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21126 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Dec 2013 at 2:03 PM (19 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-02 02:06:40 PM
Soda.
Pop.
Soda-pop.
Coke.

/discuss
 
2013-12-02 02:07:11 PM
Who the fark thought this design was a good idea?  How the fark am I supposed to read the content?

i41.tinypic.com
 
2013-12-02 02:07:15 PM
Cunning linguists.
 
2013-12-02 02:07:43 PM
When I worked DSL support for Bell Atlantic my accent would slide to wherever the network was the worst that day.
 
2013-12-02 02:08:01 PM
i.huffpost.com
 
2013-12-02 02:08:24 PM
All y'all motherfarkers talk funny
 
2013-12-02 02:09:44 PM
Where y'at, dawlin? How's ya mama and dem?
 
2013-12-02 02:11:35 PM
'Rhode Island' is not metioned. Disappointed.
 
2013-12-02 02:12:07 PM
I get accused of sounding Canadian all the time.  I grew up in Detroit but I don't think I sound like a Canuck, eh?

/it was worse when I lived in NC.  All the rednecks with the "you talk funny" BS
//At least in Oregon we are closer to the border so they know what a real Maple Syrup Sucker sounds like
 
2013-12-02 02:12:34 PM
"Inland Northern: Upstate New York and Vermont combine Western New England and the Midwest, and words like marry, merry and Mary are all pronounced identically. Delaney points out another doughnut difference: Here, they're called friedcakes."

Uhh... No they're not. At least not where I am. I think I've heard them called "friedcakes" maybe once or twice in my lifetime of living here. They're just doughnuts. The "marry, merry, and Mary" thing is spot on, though.
 
2013-12-02 02:12:47 PM
"I have a question! Why is it that we all speak in British accents, when we're from outer space where there's no Britain?"

/obscure?
//cant find pic
 
2013-12-02 02:13:48 PM
Inland Northern: Upstate New York and Vermont combine Western New England and the Midwest, and words like marry, merry and Mary are all pronounced identically. Delaney points out another doughnut difference: Here, they're called friedcakes.

I spent 30 years in that region. Never once, under any circumstances whatsoever, did I ever hear anyone use the word "friedcakes."

And besides, there's already a canonical dialect survey out there. Pop vs. soda, sub vs. hoagie vs. grinder, they're all there.
 
2013-12-02 02:14:21 PM
I reckon I otta think about this.
 
2013-12-02 02:16:12 PM
 
2013-12-02 02:17:04 PM

CCCarnie: "Inland Northern: Upstate New York and Vermont combine Western New England and the Midwest, and words like marry, merry and Mary are all pronounced identically. Delaney points out another doughnut difference: Here, they're called friedcakes."

Uhh... No they're not. At least not where I am. I think I've heard them called "friedcakes" maybe once or twice in my lifetime of living here. They're just doughnuts. The "marry, merry, and Mary" thing is spot on, though.


I agree, they're donuts, but having grown up in Rochester (Raahchester), the marry, merry, Mary thing makes me scratch my head.  Of course they all sound the same, how the hell else would they sound?
 
2013-12-02 02:17:08 PM
Granted, I'm not a huge traveler, but I've only heard donuts get called donuts.
 
2013-12-02 02:17:52 PM
 
2013-12-02 02:17:58 PM

Gunny Highway: 'Rhode Island' is not metioned. Disappointed.


Baltimore (ball-e-moore) has a very distinct tone to it as well, and should be noted.
 
2013-12-02 02:18:27 PM

ashinmytomatoes: Where y'at, dawlin? How's ya mama and dem?


I'ma pass by my mom's later. I'll ax her how dey all durin' then.
 
2013-12-02 02:19:00 PM
Soft carbonated beverages are "coke".

Pecan is pronounced "PICK-ahn".

The informal second person plural is "y'all".

The roads running alongside a highway are "feeders".

The rest of you are wrong.
 
2013-12-02 02:19:37 PM
midwestern no accent. I say soda and y'all because I like to.

But I do pronounce crayons as crowns. *sunglasses fall from the heavens*
 
2013-12-02 02:20:57 PM
Southwestern: Mexican dialects of Spanish infuse Southwestern English..

No, no they don't.

(Phoenix)
 
2013-12-02 02:21:17 PM

CCCarnie: "Inland Northern: Upstate New York and Vermont combine Western New England and the Midwest, and words like marry, merry and Mary are all pronounced identically. Delaney points out another doughnut difference: Here, they're called friedcakes."

Uhh... No they're not. At least not where I am. I think I've heard them called "friedcakes" maybe once or twice in my lifetime of living here. They're just doughnuts. The "marry, merry, and Mary" thing is spot on, though.


The regional names for foods and other objects are rapidly falling by the wayside thanks to the normative effects of television and film. If everyone on the TV calls it a "doughnut", then young people are more likely to call it "doughnut" as well.

It's a shame, really. Local vocabulary adds flavor.
 
2013-12-02 02:22:39 PM

busy chillin': midwestern no accent. I say soda and y'all because I like to.

But I do pronounce crayons as crowns. *sunglasses fall from the heavens*


I had an ex-girlfriend from Ohio. She once asked me for some crayons, pronouncing it "crowns". I literally had no idea what she was trying to say. Took us a few minutes.

She also called the shoulder of the road a "berm", which was confusing.
 
2013-12-02 02:23:02 PM

RangerTaylor: CCCarnie: "Inland Northern: Upstate New York and Vermont combine Western New England and the Midwest, and words like marry, merry and Mary are all pronounced identically. Delaney points out another doughnut difference: Here, they're called friedcakes."

Uhh... No they're not. At least not where I am. I think I've heard them called "friedcakes" maybe once or twice in my lifetime of living here. They're just doughnuts. The "marry, merry, and Mary" thing is spot on, though.

I agree, they're donuts, but having grown up in Rochester (Raahchester), the marry, merry, Mary thing makes me scratch my head.  Of course they all sound the same, how the hell else would they sound?



Not sure which is which, but it's something like
merry
mahry
meurray
 
2013-12-02 02:24:52 PM
Coastal southern should only extend to the Florida panhandle. There is almost no one from central FL down to Miami that speaks with a southern drawl.
 
2013-12-02 02:24:55 PM
How you doin?
 
2013-12-02 02:26:11 PM
Oh, and much of the "dialects" spoken of in the article are just instances of borrowed words, or new words particular to a region ("pay dirt" for example) - that's not "dialect" in my book.  Dialect is different grammar, pronunciation, and/or use of entirely different words in place of existing words (pop and soda).
 
2013-12-02 02:28:02 PM

Lord Dimwit: busy chillin': midwestern no accent. I say soda and y'all because I like to.

But I do pronounce crayons as crowns. *sunglasses fall from the heavens*

I had an ex-girlfriend from Ohio. She once asked me for some crayons, pronouncing it "crowns". I literally had no idea what she was trying to say. Took us a few minutes.

She also called the shoulder of the road a "berm", which was confusing.


If there's a ditch adjacent to the shoulder, then berm is perfectly valid.
 
2013-12-02 02:28:04 PM
I want a map titled "What do you call your 'White Trash?'"
 
2013-12-02 02:28:25 PM

Lord Dimwit: busy chillin': midwestern no accent. I say soda and y'all because I like to.

But I do pronounce crayons as crowns. *sunglasses fall from the heavens*

I had an ex-girlfriend from Ohio. She once asked me for some crayons, pronouncing it "crowns". I literally had no idea what she was trying to say. Took us a few minutes.



Haha! Yeah, it drives my wife crazy. I force myself to over enunciate and say "cray ons". But that is usually after I have already said crowns once.
 
2013-12-02 02:28:42 PM

Gunny Highway: I want a map titled "What do you call your 'White Trash?'"



I live on the border between "briar" and "hillbilly"
 
2013-12-02 02:29:02 PM

MayoSlather: Coastal southern should only extend to the Florida panhandle. There is almost no one from central FL down to Miami that speaks with a southern drawl.


Coastal southern should also extend much less inland than shown.  The accent in southeastern GA changes about 60 miles to the interior of the state.
 
2013-12-02 02:29:25 PM

DontMakeMeComeBackThere: Southwestern: Mexican dialects of Spanish infuse Southwestern English..

No, no they don't.

(Phoenix)


Do you know how to pronounce saguaro, relleno, javelina, or gila?
 
2013-12-02 02:29:28 PM
Nevermind subs/grinders/hoagies, do you say "hamburgers", "burgers", or "hamburgs"?
 
2013-12-02 02:30:37 PM

Lady Beryl Ersatz-Wendigo: Nevermind subs/grinders/hoagies, do you say "hamburgers", "burgers", or "hamburgs"?


What about "dirty Kraut sandwiches"?
 
2013-12-02 02:31:04 PM
I'm not sure that I agree with you a hundred percent on your policework there, Lou.
 
2013-12-02 02:32:22 PM

FrancoFile: Gunny Highway: I want a map titled "What do you call your 'White Trash?'"


I live on the border between "briar" and "hillbilly"


Oooh, "briar" is a new one by me.

I am somewhere between "swamp yankee" and "redneck."
 
2013-12-02 02:33:21 PM

RangerTaylor: CCCarnie: "Inland Northern: Upstate New York and Vermont combine Western New England and the Midwest, and words like marry, merry and Mary are all pronounced identically. Delaney points out another doughnut difference: Here, they're called friedcakes."

Uhh... No they're not. At least not where I am. I think I've heard them called "friedcakes" maybe once or twice in my lifetime of living here. They're just doughnuts. The "marry, merry, and Mary" thing is spot on, though.

I agree, they're donuts, but having grown up in Rochester (Raahchester), the marry, merry, Mary thing makes me scratch my head.  Of course they all sound the same, how the hell else would they sound?



Marry (short 'a', where you pronounce the 'a' like you do with 'bat')
Mary (long 'a' sort of rhymes with 'airy')
Merry (where you pronouce the 'e' like 'eh' or a short 'e')
 
2013-12-02 02:35:52 PM

RangerTaylor: I agree, they're donuts, but having grown up in Rochester (Raahchester), the marry, merry, Mary thing makes me scratch my head.  Of course they all sound the same, how the hell else would they sound?


Haha, I had the exact same thought. (I'm also from Rochester.) I even made an attempt to make them sound different. I can't do it. Everyone else must be wrong. That's the only possible conclusion.
 
2013-12-02 02:36:03 PM
assets.ilounge.com
 
2013-12-02 02:37:17 PM
I got my dialect from watching "The Wide World of Sports".
 
2013-12-02 02:37:26 PM

Lord Dimwit: Soft carbonated beverages are "coke".


COKETMis a registered trademark of the Coca-Cola Company, and refers only to soft carbonated beverages made by that company. PEPSITM, for example, is not "COKE", nor is DR. PEPPERTM. You only believe it to be true because you've been suckered by a century-long trademark genericide campaign.
 
2013-12-02 02:38:12 PM
"Useful: Where Americans talk funny, by region "

Uh-huh. In what way?
 
2013-12-02 02:39:00 PM
As a true fake Canadian (closest 2 cities are Ottawa and Montreal), and also a New Yorker, living in NYC, most people accuse me of being Canadian. I admit, I know the theme to Hockey Night in Canada better than Monday Night Football. But there's a whole swath of this country that becomes Canadian penned in by Homeland Security when you get to the extremes of the border limits.

Oh Canada? My home and native land.
//In my heart anyway.
 
2013-12-02 02:39:18 PM
They forgot the islands. That's ok. Living here will ruin your life.
 
2013-12-02 02:39:23 PM
We all sound funny, if you move around you notice this and relax about it.
 
2013-12-02 02:40:18 PM
I like that skinney blonde chick that stars on rehab addict, but I can't stand her farking EEEEaksint.
 
2013-12-02 02:41:07 PM
North Midland: Here's where the European immigrants who didn't move to New York City start playing a role. The Scotch-Irish, German and Quaker settlers from Pennsylvania to the central Midwest created what Delaney calls a "transition zone" between the north and south. Doughnuts are dunkers or fatcakes.

No, they are not.  They are doughnuts....I have lived in that area all my life and never heard dunkers or fatcakes, just like the people above with their "friedcakes"

I have a pretty "neutral" accent with just a hint of Appalachian.  Get me worked up/drunk and I slip some "aint"s into my vocabulary, among other things.
 
2013-12-02 02:42:47 PM

LemSkroob: Baltimore (ball-e-moore) has a very distinct tone to it as well, and should be noted.


yes.
 
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