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(CNN)   New book celebrates 35 years of Apple design. How someone got an entire book out of "round off the edges" is anyone's guess   (cnn.com) divider line 46
    More: Interesting, profiling, promotional products  
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835 clicks; posted to Geek » on 02 Dec 2013 at 8:30 AM (50 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-02 08:02:37 AM  
Seems appropriate though:  All the books we bought for the littlebopper when he was a toddler had rounded off edges.
 
2013-12-02 08:47:12 AM  

dittybopper: Seems appropriate though:  All the books we bought for the littlebopper when he was a toddler had rounded off edges.


So apple products are designed to the users won't hurt themselves and get an ouchie?
 
2013-12-02 08:47:53 AM  
Maybe it's just me but until the late 90ies I didn't see anything particularly wonderful about the Apple design. I've never been that big of an Apple fan so maybe I missed it but from what I can remember most of their computers were just the same beige boxes as all the other computers except you could only play games on them that were about five years behind PC games.
 
2013-12-02 09:00:14 AM  
Is it this one?

ecx.images-amazon.com
 
2013-12-02 09:02:09 AM  

RTOGUY: Maybe it's just me but until the late 90ies I didn't see anything particularly wonderful about the Apple design. I've never been that big of an Apple fan so maybe I missed it but from what I can remember most of their computers were just the same beige boxes as all the other computers except you could only play games on them that were about five years behind PC games.


Depends on how old you are. The original Apple II systems don't seem like much today, but they were revolutionary at the time. The original Macintosh was also a revolution as far a consumer-level system goes. Then, Apple became very pedestrian for a while.

The older Mac Pros (the only ones you can still get) were beautiful. I had had to dig into a lot of different computers, and I have never seen such attention given to the internals of a system.

myprosoft.ie
Sure, it doesn't make the system faster or anything, but I appreciate it the way I appreciate a fine watch. I am just a big fan of fine engineering.
 
2013-12-02 09:04:37 AM  

RTOGUY: Maybe it's just me but until the late 90ies I didn't see anything particularly wonderful about the Apple design. I've never been that big of an Apple fan so maybe I missed it but from what I can remember most of their computers were just the same beige boxes as all the other computers except you could only play games on them that were about five years behind PC games.


Really it started with the iMac and took off with the iPod. While I thought the neon color all-in-one-monstrosity was ugly as fark, people started being more concerned with what their box looked like as opposed to what it did.

/been using Macs since childhood
//there's advantages to all platforms
///except W8
////Bootcanp FTW
 
2013-12-02 09:14:18 AM  

GameSprocket: RTOGUY: Maybe it's just me but until the late 90ies I didn't see anything particularly wonderful about the Apple design. I've never been that big of an Apple fan so maybe I missed it but from what I can remember most of their computers were just the same beige boxes as all the other computers except you could only play games on them that were about five years behind PC games.

Depends on how old you are. The original Apple II systems don't seem like much today, but they were revolutionary at the time. The original Macintosh was also a revolution as far a consumer-level system goes. Then, Apple became very pedestrian for a while.

The older Mac Pros (the only ones you can still get) were beautiful. I had had to dig into a lot of different computers, and I have never seen such attention given to the internals of a system.

[myprosoft.ie image 850x888]
Sure, it doesn't make the system faster or anything, but I appreciate it the way I appreciate a fine watch. I am just a big fan of fine engineering.


yeah, the powermac g3 blew my mind back in the day with the motherboard attached to a door of the case

the new mac pro is pretty amazingly well designed too
 
2013-12-02 09:19:16 AM  

RTOGUY: Maybe it's just me but until the late 90ies I didn't see anything particularly wonderful about the Apple design. I've never been that big of an Apple fan so maybe I missed it but from what I can remember most of their computers were just the same beige boxes as all the other computers except you could only play games on them that were about five years behind PC games.


The extreme designy-ness started with the iMac. But before that, beige boxes were cheap steel enclsosures, and Macs were definitely better looking.

img.theranking.com

www.vectronicsappleworld.com

But the real feat was the hardware integration and software design  - Windows didn't even come close in usability until Windows 1995.

Networking was built into Macs. Sound was built in. Adding storage meant simply plugging in an external hard drive (or several).

None of those things were easy on a DOS machine. You had to figure out WHICH card to buy, dick around with IRQ settings (if you had an available IRQ) and install card-specific drivers.

Even buying a DOS printer wasn't simple. "Will this printer work with my Wordperfect?" "I dunno, better call the company and ask". Meanwhile, all Mac-compatible printers worked with all Mac software.
  As to games - no Macs weren't gaming computers.
 
2013-12-02 09:19:24 AM  

AdamK: GameSprocket: RTOGUY: Maybe it's just me but until the late 90ies I didn't see anything particularly wonderful about the Apple design. I've never been that big of an Apple fan so maybe I missed it but from what I can remember most of their computers were just the same beige boxes as all the other computers except you could only play games on them that were about five years behind PC games.

Depends on how old you are. The original Apple II systems don't seem like much today, but they were revolutionary at the time. The original Macintosh was also a revolution as far a consumer-level system goes. Then, Apple became very pedestrian for a while.

The older Mac Pros (the only ones you can still get) were beautiful. I had had to dig into a lot of different computers, and I have never seen such attention given to the internals of a system.

[myprosoft.ie image 850x888]
Sure, it doesn't make the system faster or anything, but I appreciate it the way I appreciate a fine watch. I am just a big fan of fine engineering.

yeah, the powermac g3 blew my mind back in the day with the motherboard attached to a door of the case

the new mac pro is pretty amazingly well designed too


the apple iic was a gorgeous little computer. So compact compared to anything out there at the time.

One can almost see Wall-E in the monitor design

oldcomputers.net
 
2013-12-02 09:23:21 AM  

buttcat: dittybopper: Seems appropriate though:  All the books we bought for the littlebopper when he was a toddler had rounded off edges.

So apple products are designed to the users won't hurt themselves and get an ouchie?


I have yet to cut myself on my MacBook Pro, so I got that going for me.
 
2013-12-02 09:58:58 AM  
blog.pekpongpaet.com
 
2013-12-02 10:05:03 AM  
Actually it'd just be "steal everyone else's ideas." My Gameboy rounded off it's edges long before Apple tried stealing that.

Of course, Apple users need it terribly. They got foam on all their furniture corners to protect themselves.
 
2013-12-02 11:10:45 AM  

Terrible Old Man: My Gameboy rounded off it's edges long before Apple tried stealing that.


Maybe Apple should try stealing that extra apostrophe.
 
2013-12-02 11:27:33 AM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Maybe Apple should try stealing that extra apostrophe.


static2.wikia.nocookie.net

No one likes a condescending grammar-nazi.
 
2013-12-02 11:34:56 AM  

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: buttcat: dittybopper: Seems appropriate though:  All the books we bought for the littlebopper when he was a toddler had rounded off edges.

So apple products are designed to the users won't hurt themselves and get an ouchie?

I have yet to cut myself on my MacBook Pro, so I got that going for me.


Funny thing about the MacBook Pro: the one place it could really use a rounded edge (the bottom of the keyboard), it doesn't have one.
 
2013-12-02 11:42:32 AM  

NuclearPenguins: Quantum Apostrophe: Maybe Apple should try stealing that extra apostrophe.

[static2.wikia.nocookie.net image 500x333]

No one likes a condescending grammar-nazi.


No hyphen, capital N.
 
2013-12-02 11:43:27 AM  
Jonathan Zufi was looking for a book of photography profiling the company's products through the years.
When he didn't find one, the Atlanta software engineer decided to make one himself.


Kunkel, Paul. "AppleDesign: The Work of the Apple Industrial Design Group" (1997; ISBN 1-888001-25-9)
 
2013-12-02 11:50:41 AM  
The obviousness of the troll, combined with how incredibly effective it is -- pure design magic.
 
2013-12-02 12:04:33 PM  
How someone got an entire book out of "round off the edges" is anyone's guess

I bet the publishers cut a lot of corners.
=Smidge=
 
2013-12-02 12:19:52 PM  

jaytkay: But the real feat was the hardware integration and software design  - Windows didn't even come close in usability until Windows 1995.

Networking was built into Macs. Sound was built in. Adding storage meant simply plugging in an external hard drive (or several).

None of those things were easy on a DOS machine. You had to figure out WHICH card to buy, dick around with IRQ settings (if you had an available IRQ) and install card-specific drivers.

Even buying a DOS printer wasn't simple. "Will this printer work with my Wordperfect?" "I dunno, better call the company and ask". Meanwhile, all Mac-compatible printers worked with all Mac software.


Apple MacIntosh.  The computer for people too stupid to figure out an IBM PC.
 
2013-12-02 12:33:29 PM  

dittybopper: jaytkay: But the real feat was the hardware integration and software design  - Windows didn't even come close in usability until Windows 1995.

Networking was built into Macs. Sound was built in. Adding storage meant simply plugging in an external hard drive (or several).

None of those things were easy on a DOS machine. You had to figure out WHICH card to buy, dick around with IRQ settings (if you had an available IRQ) and install card-specific drivers.

Even buying a DOS printer wasn't simple. "Will this printer work with my Wordperfect?" "I dunno, better call the company and ask". Meanwhile, all Mac-compatible printers worked with all Mac software.

Apple MacIntosh.  The computer for people too stupid to

who have better things to do then to figure out an IBM PC.

FTFY
 
2013-12-02 12:53:52 PM  
I remember thinking this looked like the future back then (1997):

nous.name
 
2013-12-02 01:30:11 PM  
Apple has always had a little extra design worked into their products. Maybe not always styled as extensively as we see with their current lineup, but comparing their computers from the 80s and early 90s to competing products from DOS and Windows based makers shows they went farther where the actual physical design of the product was concerned.

Sometimes it mattered, sometimes it didn't. For the most part, I agree with GameSprocket here-

GameSprocket: Sure, it doesn't make the system faster or anything, but I appreciate it the way I appreciate a fine watch. I am just a big fan of fine engineering.


That's not a bad analogy. A $30 Timex will tell the time just as well as a $200 Skagen, $500 Victorinox, or even a $2000+ Tag Heuer or $8000 Breitling. A more expensive Mac isn't going to make your documents any more eloquent. But there's a feel and a look to it that many people are willing to pay for.
 
2013-12-02 01:44:07 PM  
How Subby managed to tie his own shoes this morning is anyone's guess
 
2013-12-02 01:48:52 PM  

bingethinker: How Subby managed to tie his own shoes this morning is anyone's guess


Probably the same way Steve Jobs did.  Hit an unpaid intern and scream at them until they do it for you.
 
2013-12-02 02:10:53 PM  

Waldo Pepper: Apple MacIntosh.  The computer for people too stupid towho have better things to do then to figure out an IBM PC.

FTFY


No, I think my way still works better.

Only times I ever had a serious problem getting an IBM machine working was when I was doing something outside of the "norm".  Something you wouldn't even ever consider using a Mac for.
 
2013-12-02 02:36:38 PM  
subby: "How someone got an entire book out of "round off the edges" is anyone's guess"


To be fair, in 2010 they squared them up again, so that should fill out the material for the second half.
 
2013-12-02 02:40:39 PM  

dittybopper: Waldo Pepper: Apple MacIntosh.  The computer for people too stupid towho have better things to do then to figure out an IBM PC.

FTFY

No, I think my way still works better.

Only times I ever had a serious problem getting an IBM machine working was when I was doing something outside of the "norm".  Something you wouldn't even ever consider using a Mac for.


I'm guessing you've never really used a Mac.
 
2013-12-02 02:44:06 PM  

Terrible Old Man: Actually it'd just be "steal everyone else's ideas." My Gameboy rounded off it's edges long before Apple tried stealing that.

Of course, Apple users need it terribly. They got foam on all their furniture corners to protect themselves.


www.spider-mac.com

Yep. Look at all these clueless morons using Macs at work.
 
2013-12-02 02:55:25 PM  

dittybopper: Waldo Pepper: Apple MacIntosh.  The computer for people too stupid towho have better things to do then to figure out an IBM PC.

FTFY

No, I think my way still works better.

Only times I ever had a serious problem getting an IBM machine working was when I was doing something outside of the "norm".  Something you wouldn't even ever consider using a Mac for.


Honestly i never understood why most average folks didn't go for the mac.  for the average home user especially in the earlier days of home computing the mac is just so much easier to set up and use.

but it set it up and use it for the 3-4 years without it ever needing an upgrade and doubtful that you ever screw it up so bad that you need it repaired. 

now i had an Amiga 500 and 2000 back in the day and that was a fun machine to have...i actually
 
2013-12-02 02:59:04 PM  

Waldo Pepper: Honestly i never understood why most average folks didn't go for the mac.  for the average home user especially in the earlier days of home computing the mac is just so much easier to set up and use.


Price and software, with a lesser dollop of familiarity.

Macs have always been the expensive option. There's just not really been a time when a Mac of the equivalent spot in the lineup hasn't been a few hundred bucks more expensive. When a purchaser looks at the higher price tag and realizes "I'd be paying that much more to only be able to run a fraction of the programs that are out there for the IBM clone," the deal is pretty much done. Factor in the far greater penetration of DOS/Windows machines in the office, and those who would be interested in a home computer would have had some familiarity with the cheaper IBM clones that also have a larger library of software. Thus, the Mac doesn't really even seem to have a huge payoff in simplicity- they're already used to the complexity of the competition.
 
2013-12-02 03:03:04 PM  
Looks like it's the GEEK tab's turn to throw the Apple hate party today.

/yawn
 
2013-12-02 03:05:31 PM  

Waldo Pepper: dittybopper: Waldo Pepper: Apple MacIntosh.  The computer for people too stupid towho have better things to do then to figure out an IBM PC.

FTFY

No, I think my way still works better.

Only times I ever had a serious problem getting an IBM machine working was when I was doing something outside of the "norm".  Something you wouldn't even ever consider using a Mac for.

Honestly i never understood why most average folks didn't go for the mac.  for the average home user especially in the earlier days of home computing the mac is just so much easier to set up and use.

but it set it up and use it for the 3-4 years without it ever needing an upgrade and doubtful that you ever screw it up so bad that you need it repaired. 

now i had an Amiga 500 and 2000 back in the day and that was a fun machine to have...i actually


Because you could build your own IBM compatible system for far less than a new Apple.
 
2013-12-02 03:06:31 PM  

akula: Waldo Pepper: Honestly i never understood why most average folks didn't go for the mac.  for the average home user especially in the earlier days of home computing the mac is just so much easier to set up and use.

Price and software, with a lesser dollop of familiarity.

Macs have always been the expensive option. There's just not really been a time when a Mac of the equivalent spot in the lineup hasn't been a few hundred bucks more expensive. When a purchaser looks at the higher price tag and realizes "I'd be paying that much more to only be able to run a fraction of the programs that are out there for the IBM clone," the deal is pretty much done. Factor in the far greater penetration of DOS/Windows machines in the office, and those who would be interested in a home computer would have had some familiarity with the cheaper IBM clones that also have a larger library of software. Thus, the Mac doesn't really even seem to have a huge payoff in simplicity- they're already used to the complexity of the competition.


maybe in the late 90's early 2000's but before that one could get the Apple iic for the same price as the pc jr and years later still be using the apple iic.  honestly for home use most of that "software" that pc vendors bragged about was either worthless or not needed. 

I guess Apple is getting the last laugh in the marketplace
 
2013-12-02 04:02:22 PM  
/Channel Steve Jobs on

"A paper book?  How quaint."

/Steve Jobs off.
 
2013-12-02 04:40:32 PM  

dittybopper: Apple MacIntosh. The computer for people too stupid to figure out an IBM PC.


Some things never change.

/having options and complete control over your device is scary!!!
 
2013-12-02 04:42:16 PM  

Cpl.D: bingethinker: How Subby managed to tie his own shoes this morning is anyone's guess

Probably the same way Steve Jobs did.  Hit an unpaid intern and scream at them until they do it for you.


Apple users use velcro. Laces are too complicated.
 
2013-12-02 04:46:06 PM  

Waldo Pepper: akula: Waldo Pepper: Honestly i never understood why most average folks didn't go for the mac.  for the average home user especially in the earlier days of home computing the mac is just so much easier to set up and use.

Price and software, with a lesser dollop of familiarity.

Macs have always been the expensive option. There's just not really been a time when a Mac of the equivalent spot in the lineup hasn't been a few hundred bucks more expensive. When a purchaser looks at the higher price tag and realizes "I'd be paying that much more to only be able to run a fraction of the programs that are out there for the IBM clone," the deal is pretty much done. Factor in the far greater penetration of DOS/Windows machines in the office, and those who would be interested in a home computer would have had some familiarity with the cheaper IBM clones that also have a larger library of software. Thus, the Mac doesn't really even seem to have a huge payoff in simplicity- they're already used to the complexity of the competition.

maybe in the late 90's early 2000's but before that one could get the Apple iic for the same price as the pc jr and years later still be using the apple iic.  honestly for home use most of that "software" that pc vendors bragged about was either worthless or not needed. 

I guess Apple is getting the last laugh in the marketplace


Well, the question was more about the Mac than about the Apple II. The II series was impressive, but the III just dead-ended the line. Then it was on to the Macintosh series and the rest was history.

Sometimes I wonder how things might have panned out had Apple taken the corporate market more seriously; they seemed to be content with the educational, desktop publishing, and part of the consumer markets.
 
2013-12-02 05:12:47 PM  

akula: Waldo Pepper: akula: Waldo Pepper: Honestly i never understood why most average folks didn't go for the mac.  for the average home user especially in the earlier days of home computing the mac is just so much easier to set up and use.

Price and software, with a lesser dollop of familiarity.

Macs have always been the expensive option. There's just not really been a time when a Mac of the equivalent spot in the lineup hasn't been a few hundred bucks more expensive. When a purchaser looks at the higher price tag and realizes "I'd be paying that much more to only be able to run a fraction of the programs that are out there for the IBM clone," the deal is pretty much done. Factor in the far greater penetration of DOS/Windows machines in the office, and those who would be interested in a home computer would have had some familiarity with the cheaper IBM clones that also have a larger library of software. Thus, the Mac doesn't really even seem to have a huge payoff in simplicity- they're already used to the complexity of the competition.

maybe in the late 90's early 2000's but before that one could get the Apple iic for the same price as the pc jr and years later still be using the apple iic.  honestly for home use most of that "software" that pc vendors bragged about was either worthless or not needed. 

I guess Apple is getting the last laugh in the marketplace

Well, the question was more about the Mac than about the Apple II. The II series was impressive, but the III just dead-ended the line. Then it was on to the Macintosh series and the rest was history.

Sometimes I wonder how things might have panned out had Apple taken the corporate market more seriously; they seemed to be content with the educational, desktop publishing, and part of the consumer markets.


agreed but it might have taken away from their monopoly on the artistic side. it is a shame they seem to be leaving the film/photography market behind.
 
2013-12-02 05:52:21 PM  

umad: /having options and complete control over your device is scary!!!


OS X is a Unix.  Linux isn't even a Unix. Here's a quarter, get yourself etc. etc.

Does Windows come with an ssh client yet, or do you still have to download PuTTY first?
 
2013-12-02 07:11:53 PM  

fo_sho!: I remember thinking this looked like the future back then (1997): [20th Anniversary Mac]


Apparently Apple thinks its still does look like the future; cover up the Bose logo on that subwoofer/power supply and you could pass it off as the new Mac Pro.
 
2013-12-02 08:19:39 PM  

umad: dittybopper: Apple MacIntosh. The computer for people too stupid to figure out an IBM PC.

Some things never change.

/having options and complete control over your device is scary!!!


Things do change.

Some people don't, and for some reason they're resentful because Macs were much better than PCs twenty years ago.

Windows caught up. They aren't that different these days.
 
2013-12-02 08:33:04 PM  

poot_rootbeer: Does Windows come with an ssh client yet

...

Yes, it's called Powershell. Funny that you mention it.

/Platform agnostic
//Get paid no matter what machine they put in front of me.
 
2013-12-03 01:09:38 AM  

AdamK: GameSprocket: RTOGUY: Maybe it's just me but until the late 90ies I didn't see anything particularly wonderful about the Apple design. I've never been that big of an Apple fan so maybe I missed it but from what I can remember most of their computers were just the same beige boxes as all the other computers except you could only play games on them that were about five years behind PC games.

Depends on how old you are. The original Apple II systems don't seem like much today, but they were revolutionary at the time. The original Macintosh was also a revolution as far a consumer-level system goes. Then, Apple became very pedestrian for a while.

The older Mac Pros (the only ones you can still get) were beautiful. I had had to dig into a lot of different computers, and I have never seen such attention given to the internals of a system.

[myprosoft.ie image 850x888]
Sure, it doesn't make the system faster or anything, but I appreciate it the way I appreciate a fine watch. I am just a big fan of fine engineering.

yeah, the powermac g3 blew my mind back in the day with the motherboard attached to a door of the case

the new mac pro is pretty amazingly well designed too


Although I don't take apart computers so often, I was impressed at how the internals of original iMac G5 were so efficiently laid out to maximize the use of the small space inside a box less than 2 inches thick (without being a laptop). The one I've got has the larger 20" screen; the 17" model crams everything into an even smaller space.

20-inch:
upload.wikimedia.org

17-inch:
media.soundonsound.com
 
2013-12-03 01:52:09 PM  

cyberspacedout: the new mac pro is pretty amazingly well designed too


yes it is, by Intel.
 
2013-12-03 07:45:50 PM  

Red_Fox: cyberspacedout: the new mac pro is pretty amazingly well designed too

yes it is, by Intel.


That's actually AdamK I was quoting; I haven't used the newer machines.
 
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