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(Gizmodo UK)   3D printing is so last year. The real innovation nowadays is in 4D printing   (gizmodo.co.uk ) divider line
    More: Cool, U.S. Army Research Office  
•       •       •

6544 clicks; posted to Geek » on 29 Nov 2013 at 3:52 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



44 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-11-29 03:54:28 PM  
Summary: 4D printing is 3D printing with joints or something that isn't a fixed thing.
 
2013-11-29 04:07:41 PM  
Nobody needs more than a pair of Ds
 
2013-11-29 04:09:18 PM  
Pfffft!

I turned 4D ten years ago!
 
2013-11-29 04:09:29 PM  
What I want to know is, however, why? Those shapes are interesting, and the concept is intriguing, but I see no immediate application to having this except to unfold, which is easily done through current printing and manufacturing. If this were to transform from one object to another, then this would have application, but now this is just unfolding to a set shape which would serve a singular function, the same as if produced in parts or whole but fixed.
 
2013-11-29 04:12:31 PM  

Vangor: What I want to know is, however, why? Those shapes are interesting, and the concept is intriguing, but I see no immediate application to having this except to unfold, which is easily done through current printing and manufacturing. If this were to transform from one object to another, then this would have application, but now this is just unfolding to a set shape which would serve a singular function, the same as if produced in parts or whole but fixed.


From watching the video it looks like it means that a object larger than the printer can be printed all smashed up, and then unfolded into the true shape.

However, the example they use is an dress, which seems like it would be both ridiculously revealing, and hideously uncomfortable.
 
2013-11-29 04:14:05 PM  

Vangor: What I want to know is, however, why? Those shapes are interesting, and the concept is intriguing, but I see no immediate application to having this except to unfold, which is easily done through current printing and manufacturing. If this were to transform from one object to another, then this would have application, but now this is just unfolding to a set shape which would serve a singular function, the same as if produced in parts or whole but fixed.


I would imagine that it can be used as a skeleton or support structure of some sort. It being able to change shape would allow for manufacturing of large object in a relatively small space. Additionally the ability to fold it up into a neat little stack would make transport easier.
 
2013-11-29 04:14:14 PM  
Obama's printing in 4-D years into the future already.
 
2013-11-29 04:17:31 PM  

Vangor: What I want to know is, however, why? Those shapes are interesting, and the concept is intriguing, but I see no immediate application to having this except to unfold, which is easily done through current printing and manufacturing. If this were to transform from one object to another, then this would have application, but now this is just unfolding to a set shape which would serve a singular function, the same as if produced in parts or whole but fixed.


While I like 3d printing none of the examples they gave wouldn't be better served by using a different material, like cloth or sheets of plastic, or printing a few larger pieces and assembling it later. In theory it's good but as a practical application it's clearly years away.
 
2013-11-29 04:20:05 PM  

Garbonzo42: From watching the video it looks like it means that a object larger than the printer can be printed all smashed up, and then unfolded into the true shape.


Which makes sense, but makes further sense to simply print parts.

Luse: I would imagine that it can be used as a skeleton or support structure of some sort. It being able to change shape would allow for manufacturing of large object in a relatively small space. Additionally the ability to fold it up into a neat little stack would make transport easier.


Again, simply print parts. Unhooking parts and laying them flat seems far more effective for transport, and a large object may be constructed out of multiple pieces printed individually.

Cpl.D: Probably so anything can fit in a flat pack box.


This I more see is commercial application for unskilled and simplistic erecting of objects.

I suppose the head scratching is because this is early and thus has no immediate application but may have one, thus I may be asking too much too soon.
 
2013-11-29 04:26:14 PM  

Vangor: Garbonzo42: From watching the video it looks like it means that a object larger than the printer can be printed all smashed up, and then unfolded into the true shape.

Which makes sense, but makes further sense to simply print parts.

Luse: I would imagine that it can be used as a skeleton or support structure of some sort. It being able to change shape would allow for manufacturing of large object in a relatively small space. Additionally the ability to fold it up into a neat little stack would make transport easier.

Again, simply print parts. Unhooking parts and laying them flat seems far more effective for transport, and a large object may be constructed out of multiple pieces printed individually.

Cpl.D: Probably so anything can fit in a flat pack box.

This I more see is commercial application for unskilled and simplistic erecting of objects.

I suppose the head scratching is because this is early and thus has no immediate application but may have one, thus I may be asking too much too soon.


From a manufacturing standpoint it's easier to print parts and have skilled workers assemble them. If you lack skilled workers however this becomes a problem. If you can have the change triggered by passing current through the structure, or temperature or something similar you could have it essentially assemble itself, with no skilled workers needed.
I would imagine disaster relief efforts would benefit greatly from a building framework that self assembles providing a more rigid building than a tent.
 
2013-11-29 04:45:51 PM  
Everybody knows the 4th dimension is time.
It would be cool if someone invents a way to print more of that......

This is not that. This is cool jewelry.
 
2013-11-29 04:47:56 PM  

Luse: From a manufacturing standpoint it's easier to print parts and have skilled workers assemble them. If you lack skilled workers however this becomes a problem.


And if you have skilled workers, this is also a problem. That's the real advantage to 4D, from a manufacturing standpoint: not having to pay a person to assemble the work.
 
2013-11-29 04:48:01 PM  
Penrose already did it.
 
2013-11-29 04:50:59 PM  

Millennium: Luse: From a manufacturing standpoint it's easier to print parts and have skilled workers assemble them. If you lack skilled workers however this becomes a problem.

And if you have skilled workers, this is also a problem. That's the real advantage to 4D, from a manufacturing standpoint: not having to pay a person to assemble the work.


That was my point.
 
2013-11-29 05:18:50 PM  
What would happen if you 4D printed a spaceship part?
[headexplosion.gif]
 
2013-11-29 05:25:57 PM  
4D Printing... 3D printing with marketing hype.
 
2013-11-29 05:25:58 PM  

McGrits: What would happen if you 4D printed a spaceship part?
[headexplosion.gif]


That depends. If it was an unmanned ship you might be ok. If, on the other hand it was meant for manned space flight, Quantum Apostrophe's colon would rupture washing away most of the Geek tab.
 
2013-11-29 05:28:05 PM  

MindStalker: Summary: 4D printing is 3D printing with joints or something that isn't a fixed thing.


Summary: Performance art and hype.

Luse: McGrits: What would happen if you 4D printed a spaceship part?
[headexplosion.gif]

That depends. If it was an unmanned ship you might be ok. If, on the other hand it was meant for manned space flight, Quantum Apostrophe's colon would rupture washing away most of the Geek tab.


We are so nowhere even close to that. So you can kiss your sci-fi delusions good bye too. You're lucky: you can 4D print some novelty clacking teeth to do it with.
 
2013-11-29 05:29:15 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: MindStalker: Summary: 4D printing is 3D printing with joints or something that isn't a fixed thing.

Summary: Performance art and hype.

Luse: McGrits: What would happen if you 4D printed a spaceship part?
[headexplosion.gif]

That depends. If it was an unmanned ship you might be ok. If, on the other hand it was meant for manned space flight, Quantum Apostrophe's colon would rupture washing away most of the Geek tab.

We are so nowhere even close to that. So you can kiss your sci-fi delusions good bye too. You're lucky: you can 4D print some novelty clacking teeth to do it with.


DAR SHE BLOWS!
 
2013-11-29 05:45:36 PM  
3D printing is already 4D printing. Does it disappear the instant it is created? No? Then it's 4D, asshole. It's traveling along the time axis simply by continuing to exist.
 
2013-11-29 05:48:58 PM  
OoOOOoo, I smell a new numbers war!  Just like the carriers and 4G.  Nobody has it, but they bastard it down to a 'marketing term' to gain an edge and attract a bigger share of the plebeians.

/I'm holding out for next year's 5D.
 
2013-11-29 05:52:05 PM  
Mmmm, 4 Ds....

jameystegmaier.com
 
2013-11-29 05:52:46 PM  

HotWingAgenda: 3D printing is already 4D printing. Does it disappear the instant it is created? No? Then it's 4D, asshole. It's traveling along the time axis simply by continuing to exist.


I hate to break it to you but time is not the 4th dimension.
 
2013-11-29 06:14:37 PM  

Luse: HotWingAgenda: 3D printing is already 4D printing. Does it disappear the instant it is created? No? Then it's 4D, asshole. It's traveling along the time axis simply by continuing to exist.

I hate to break it to you but time is not the 4th dimension.


I think I'll go with Einstein over some asshole with a shiatty blog and a wad of Slovenians.

I have always been a lover of Einstein's theory of relativity. The idea of the four dimensional space-time with time being the fourth dimension seems a very good theory to me.But the scientists at the Scientific Research Centre Bistra in Ptuj, Slovenia, think otherwise.According to them time is not the fourth dimension.In fact time is not a dimension at all!!!
 
2013-11-29 06:17:56 PM  
Hurray! Another Doctor Who thread!

[RTFA]

Oh.
 
2013-11-29 06:19:05 PM  
Solar panels that deploy more reliably?
 
2013-11-29 06:31:00 PM  

HotWingAgenda: Luse: HotWingAgenda: 3D printing is already 4D printing. Does it disappear the instant it is created? No? Then it's 4D, asshole. It's traveling along the time axis simply by continuing to exist.

I hate to break it to you but time is not the 4th dimension.

I think I'll go with Einstein over some asshole with a shiatty blog and a wad of Slovenians.

I have always been a lover of Einstein's theory of relativity. The idea of the four dimensional space-time with time being the fourth dimension seems a very good theory to me.But the scientists at the Scientific Research Centre Bistra in Ptuj, Slovenia, think otherwise.According to them time is not the fourth dimension.In fact time is not a dimension at all!!!


Personally I'm on the fence. Obviously I won't stand here and pretend that I know better than Einstein or Hawking, however the 4th dimension being spacial, like the other 3 makes sense to me. That's the great thing about Science, it demands that you question it, and being wrong or right in your hypothesis is equally welcome.
 
2013-11-29 06:37:53 PM  

Vangor: Garbonzo42: From watching the video it looks like it means that a object larger than the printer can be printed all smashed up, and then unfolded into the true shape.

Which makes sense, but makes further sense to simply print parts.

Luse: I would imagine that it can be used as a skeleton or support structure of some sort. It being able to change shape would allow for manufacturing of large object in a relatively small space. Additionally the ability to fold it up into a neat little stack would make transport easier.

Again, simply print parts. Unhooking parts and laying them flat seems far more effective for transport, and a large object may be constructed out of multiple pieces printed individually.

Cpl.D: Probably so anything can fit in a flat pack box.

This I more see is commercial application for unskilled and simplistic erecting of objects.

I suppose the head scratching is because this is early and thus has no immediate application but may have one, thus I may be asking too much too soon.


It's not that early.  This sort of stuff is rather old.  Been around nearly as long as mechanics as a field at least.  Last time I recall it gaining prominence was NASA trying to find better ways to pack large rigid structures in the least amount of space possible, or something like that.
 
2013-11-29 06:42:17 PM  

Vangor: What I want to know is, however, why? Those shapes are interesting, and the concept is intriguing, but I see no immediate application to having this except to unfold, which is easily done through current printing and manufacturing. If this were to transform from one object to another, then this would have application, but now this is just unfolding to a set shape which would serve a singular function, the same as if produced in parts or whole but fixed.


I think there's more than meets the eye going on with this idea.
 
2013-11-29 06:43:30 PM  

Vangor: What I want to know is, however, why? Those shapes are interesting, and the concept is intriguing, but I see no immediate application to having this except to unfold, which is easily done through current printing and manufacturing. If this were to transform from one object to another, then this would have application, but now this is just unfolding to a set shape which would serve a singular function, the same as if produced in parts or whole but fixed.



Add motors at each joint and thinks get interesting
 
2013-11-29 06:47:15 PM  
On the microscopic scale, a 4-d printed vascular stent using something like nitinol alloy could be used to fix very tiny arteries in the neck and brain, being small for implantation but then expanding to final form using body heat.
 
2013-11-29 06:52:18 PM  
I kinda wanted to see them make a real dress rather than just a computer simulation.

Plus you could print out the frame of the dress, cover it in sprayable fabric or something, then remove the frame. You have the new designer dress, and can recycle the frame for the next time you need to 3D print something.
 
2013-11-29 07:02:18 PM  
On a macro scale, it is handy to make a one-piece parabolic antenna structure that could travel in a compacted state in a small rocket, then deploy to full size in space.  This is already done to an extent, but this tech could help make bigger structures fit in smaller capsules.  Good for com sats, sigint sats, also radio telescopes and things like solar sails or magsails for deep space cargo transport.  So, yes, this 4 d printing tech could be used for deep space exploration.... as well as life-extension.
 
2013-11-29 07:10:59 PM  

Any Pie Left: On the microscopic scale, a 4-d printed vascular stent using something like nitinol alloy could be used to fix very tiny arteries in the neck and brain, being small for implantation but then expanding to final form using body heat.


Any Pie Left: On a macro scale, it is handy to make a one-piece parabolic antenna structure that could travel in a compacted state in a small rocket, then deploy to full size in space.  This is already done to an extent, but this tech could help make bigger structures fit in smaller capsules.  Good for com sats, sigint sats, also radio telescopes and things like solar sails or magsails for deep space cargo transport.  So, yes, this 4 d printing tech could be used for deep space exploration.... as well as life-extension.


You're just begging for some namecalling from Fark's Resident "Definitely Not A Troll", QA.
 
2013-11-29 07:20:56 PM  
Add motors and a network. Allow for joints to connect/reconnect on command and some very interesting applications become possible
 
2013-11-29 07:22:06 PM  

Any Pie Left: On a macro scale, it is handy to make a one-piece parabolic antenna structure that could travel in a compacted state in a small rocket, then deploy to full size in space.  This is already done to an extent, but this tech could help make bigger structures fit in smaller capsules.  Good for com sats, sigint sats, also radio telescopes and things like solar sails or magsails for deep space cargo transport.  So, yes, this 4 d printing tech could be used for deep space exploration.... as well as life-extension.


Clearly, this is how the aliens fit that huge antenna inside Cartman's large intestine.
 
2013-11-29 08:21:50 PM  

Son of Thunder: Hurray! Another Doctor Who thread!

[RTFA]

Oh.


Yep. No wibbly-wobbly, timey-wimey stuff in this printer...
 
2013-11-29 09:11:35 PM  
We need to print out Ted Cruz.
 
2013-11-29 09:24:21 PM  

xanadian: Son of Thunder: Hurray! Another Doctor Who thread!

[RTFA]

Oh.

Yep. No wibbly-wobbly, timey-wimey stuff in this printer...


Can it print a Fez?

'cause they're cool.
 
2013-11-29 11:37:23 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: MindStalker: Summary: 4D printing is 3D printing with joints or something that isn't a fixed thing.

Summary: Performance art and hype.

Luse: McGrits: What would happen if you 4D printed a spaceship part?
[headexplosion.gif]

That depends. If it was an unmanned ship you might be ok. If, on the other hand it was meant for manned space flight, Quantum Apostrophe's colon would rupture washing away most of the Geek tab.

We are so nowhere even close to that. So you can kiss your sci-fi delusions good bye too. You're lucky: you can 4D print some novelty clacking teeth to do it with.


I'm not sure that teeth can kiss. That sounds unpleasant to me.
 
2013-11-29 11:39:09 PM  

dprathbun: Penrose already did it.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aKcEwUcVBHs

Colonel Corazon Santiago did it firster
 
2013-11-30 12:42:09 AM  
Print me out a klein bottle when you get the chance.
 
2013-11-30 01:10:54 AM  

Any Pie Left: On the microscopic scale, a 4-d printed vascular stent using something like nitinol alloy could be used to fix very tiny arteries in the neck and brain, being small for implantation but then expanding to final form using body heat.


The Wikipedia entry for nickel titanium mentions just such an application already used for stents, so I imagine that your application is not far off.
 
2013-11-30 01:19:49 AM  
Gillette says fark everything, we're doing 5-D.
 
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