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(NPR)   Three engineering students from Rice spend two years learning the most important lesson in their careers   (npr.org) divider line 38
    More: Cool, rice, bone disease, robotic arm, lessons, brittle bone disease, school year  
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6571 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 Nov 2013 at 1:13 PM (33 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



38 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-11-28 08:40:30 AM
these guys must be studying the impacts of dust too. cause it sure got dusty in here quickly.

/go owls!
 
2013-11-28 01:26:56 PM
That we're still building 19th century toys instead of biological cures?
 
2013-11-28 01:28:27 PM
And all my senior design project did was autonomously drive around a room looking for radiation sources. I wish we had come up with a cool idea like this one.
 
2013-11-28 01:31:13 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: That we're still building 19th century toys instead of biological cures?


danspapers.com
 
2013-11-28 01:49:58 PM
Damn, I hate to break it to the boys, but there was already an off the shelf solution.
Hey guys, question...who told you the arm had to be mounted to the chair?
Right.  Why not one of those crawler-tracked claw robots that are so popular in bomb squads these days, just make a mounting on his chair that he can drive it onto and park it when not in use.
 
2013-11-28 01:52:49 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: That we're still building 19th century toys instead of biological cures?


Well, you're on to us.  Nobody anywhere in the world is investigating ways to treat or prevent OI. All we have is a few engineering students building gadgets.
 
2013-11-28 01:56:11 PM

Yakivegas: Quantum Apostrophe: That we're still building 19th century toys instead of biological cures?

Well, you're on to us.  Nobody anywhere in the world is investigating ways to treat or prevent OI. All we have is a few engineering students building gadgets.


Where are the results? Where is the equivalent to the Apollo project?
 
2013-11-28 01:56:18 PM
Waldo
 
2013-11-28 02:07:47 PM

2wolves: Waldo


Hard to find.
 
2013-11-28 02:13:26 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: That we're still building 19th century toys instead of biological cures?


1/10
 
2013-11-28 02:21:22 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: That we're still building 19th century toys instead of biological cures?


glarkware.com
 
2013-11-28 02:25:28 PM
It's cheap because it's not a robot.  A robot knows where it and receives instructions in the form of where you want it to be.  This is controlled with a xbox controller.  It's somewhere in the grey area between robot and hard automation.  Shaft encoders are expensive.
 
2013-11-28 02:29:09 PM
Man I wouldn't jerk off with that arm.
 
2013-11-28 02:32:00 PM
You can't push a rope?

/DNRTFA
 
2013-11-28 02:35:05 PM

Ishidan: Damn, I hate to break it to the boys, but there was already an off the shelf solution.
Hey guys, question...who told you the arm had to be mounted to the chair?
Right.  Why not one of those crawler-tracked claw robots that are so popular in bomb squads these days, just make a mounting on his chair that he can drive it onto and park it when not in use.


If he spends the majority of his time in the chair, mounting it to the chair makes sense.  Since it looks like a motorized chair anyway, they can just tap into that power source which is likely more convenient than having a detachable robot that needs to be charged on its own.

Not to mention something that drives around on its own has the potential to get stuck on obstacles, and if the kid can't even manipulate small objects, he wouldn't be able to get it loose if it did.
 
2013-11-28 02:36:13 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: That we're still building 19th century toys instead of biological cures?


Heaven forbid the students 3d printed any of the arm parts...
 
2013-11-28 02:42:42 PM
or..you know...just lower the light switch to where he could reach it.
 
2013-11-28 02:43:41 PM

"Dee can't operate a light switch because he can't reach far enough from his wheelchair. He has a disorder called osteogenesis imperfecta, also known as brittle bone disease. "

"Now that we know who you are, I know who I am. I'm not a mistake! It all makes sense! In a comic, you know how you can tell who the arch-villain's going to be? He's the exact opposite of the hero. And most times they're friends, like you and me! I should've known way back when... You know why, David? Because of the kids. They called me Mr Glass."


images1.wikia.nocookie.net

 
2013-11-28 02:50:22 PM

Stone Meadow: Quantum Apostrophe: That we're still building 19th century toys instead of biological cures?

Heaven forbid the students 3d printed any of the arm parts...


ctrl-f 3D

nope. I think we hit peak 3D a few months ago. Reality must be sinking in, Makerbots are in closets next to broken Robosapiens and pet rocks.

Engineering students must understand by now that going through the McMaster-Carr website is far better and faster than thinking you can reinvent engineering materials or parts.
 
2013-11-28 02:51:39 PM
Project Glass?
 
2013-11-28 02:52:16 PM
TuteTibiImperes:
If he spends the majority of his time in the chair, mounting it to the chair makes sense.  Since it looks like a motorized chair anyway, they can just tap into that power source which is likely more convenient than having a detachable robot that needs to be charged on its own.

Not to mention something that drives around on its own has the potential to get stuck on obstacles, and if the kid can't even manipulate small objects, he wouldn't be able to get it loose if it did.


Heh, maybe.  But trust me, the guy doesn't charge his own chair, either.  He physically can't.  It'd just be one more thing for his orderly to plug in at night.  Also, the milspec robots are designed to be hard to hang up on obstacles-if the robot is designed to be able to navigate a rubble-strewn war zone, it should be able to handle anyplace he's planning to go, with ease.
 
2013-11-28 02:52:45 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: nope. I think we hit peak 3D a few months ago. Reality must be sinking in, Makerbots are in closets next to broken Robosapiens and pet rocks.


http://3dprintingindustry.com/
 
2013-11-28 02:54:10 PM
i.walmartimages.com
 
2013-11-28 02:56:05 PM

Ashion_Archanion: [i.walmartimages.com image 500x500]


"looks at pic of kid"

lol...that's just cruel.
 
2013-11-28 03:11:33 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Stone Meadow: Heaven forbid the students 3d printed any of the arm parts...

nope. I think we hit peak 3D a few months ago. Reality must be sinking in, Makerbots are in closets next to broken Robosapiens and pet rocks.

Engineering students must understand by now that going through the McMaster-Carr website is far better and faster than thinking you can reinvent engineering materials or parts.


Says you're full of shiat...

~global.fncstatic.com

Says you're full of shiat...

~static.guim.co.uk

Says you're full of shiat...

~www.beyonddesignchicago.com
 
2013-11-28 03:13:08 PM

mr lawson: Ashion_Archanion: [i.walmartimages.com image 500x500]

"looks at pic of kid"

lol...that's just cruel.


Jeez.   Now you make me feel guilty because it's possible the kid can't clap?   I guess we have to build him a second robot arm so he can.
 
2013-11-28 03:34:22 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Yakivegas: Quantum Apostrophe: That we're still building 19th century toys instead of biological cures?

Well, you're on to us.  Nobody anywhere in the world is investigating ways to treat or prevent OI. All we have is a few engineering students building gadgets.

Where are the results? Where is the equivalent to the Apollo project?


The human genome project.

/knows better than to bite. Bit anyways.
 
2013-11-28 03:36:55 PM

Ashion_Archanion: mr lawson: Ashion_Archanion: [i.walmartimages.com image 500x500]

"looks at pic of kid"

lol...that's just cruel.

Jeez.   Now you make me feel guilty because it's possible the kid can't clap?   I guess we have to build him a second robot arm so he can.


Clapper was my first thought. 2nd was lowering the light switch. So you're both right. Or voice activated. Or thought controlled. All seem easier than a remote controlled arm.
 
2013-11-28 03:46:33 PM
and that was how Mr. Glass became The Scorpion.
 
2013-11-28 04:14:53 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: That we're still building 19th century toys instead of biological cures?


So how about you stop threadshiatting, put your money where your mouth is and do something useful?

/Away troll
 
2013-11-28 04:24:18 PM

Ishidan: Heh, maybe. But trust me, the guy doesn't charge his own chair, either. He physically can't. It'd just be one more thing for his orderly to plug in at night. Also, the milspec robots are designed to be hard to hang up on obstacles-if the robot is designed to be able to navigate a rubble-strewn war zone, it should be able to handle anyplace he's planning to go, with ease.


There is still the issue of space usage. Why not a relatively small add-on to the chair, which he already takes with him where ever he goes, instead of an add-on which takes up space in the house and needs to be retrieved whenever he needs it?
 
2013-11-28 05:01:06 PM
Some of you are very sad excuses for Human beings.
Luckily the engineering students are better examples.
Using your skills and knowledge to improve lives around you in real tangible ways is nothing to be snotty about.
 
2013-11-28 07:15:49 PM
Most important lesson of their careers?  That their bosses will most likely be Poli Sci grads that were C students?
 
2013-11-28 09:17:54 PM
Might I point out one obvious thing?  Why make a robot hand when the dude is small enough to be put on his own robotic platform? I mean just do that and he can grab what ever he wants with his own hand.
 
2013-11-28 11:34:29 PM

mrlewish: Might I point out one obvious thing?  Why make a robot hand when the dude is small enough to be put on his own robotic platform? I mean just do that and he can grab what ever he wants with his own hand.


It does mention in the article that his arms and legs are all twisted (one of the Rice students makes this observation). Looks like some of his fingers are, too. Might be that he can't extend his arms enough to reach far enough beyond his wheelchair footprint to do much. There's also the question of lessened strength at extension, and he doesn't look to have much limb strength to begin with.

And for those of you who mention lowering the light switches - well, yeah. But now he can operate the switches in any room he can get into, and rooms in his friends' houses, and other hospital rooms, and so on. How liberating is that? Not to be confined to a room that had to be modified for you so you can do the things everybody else does, anywhere.

Pretty sweet, all in all. Proud of my fellow Owls. Nicely done!
 
2013-11-28 11:50:18 PM

Egoy3k: It's cheap because it's not a robot.  A robot knows where it and receives instructions in the form of where you want it to be.  This is controlled with a xbox controller.  It's somewhere in the grey area between robot and hard automation.  Shaft encoders are expensive.


It's cheap because they didn't include their time to research and fabrication hours.  800$ in prototype world doesn't event get you a phone call
 
2013-11-29 07:51:37 AM

Slaxl: Ashion_Archanion: mr lawson: Ashion_Archanion: [i.walmartimages.com image 500x500]

"looks at pic of kid"

lol...that's just cruel.

Jeez.   Now you make me feel guilty because it's possible the kid can't clap?   I guess we have to build him a second robot arm so he can.

Clapper was my first thought. 2nd was lowering the light switch. So you're both right. Or voice activated. Or thought controlled. All seem easier than a remote controlled arm.


it is not a problem to adapt his own house to him, but the arm alow him to use more of the stuff outside that are not taylored to him.
More important, he feels less handicaped
 
2013-11-29 08:17:56 AM

TuteTibiImperes: Ishidan: Damn, I hate to break it to the boys, but there was already an off the shelf solution.
Hey guys, question...who told you the arm had to be mounted to the chair?
Right.  Why not one of those crawler-tracked claw robots that are so popular in bomb squads these days, just make a mounting on his chair that he can drive it onto and park it when not in use.

If he spends the majority of his time in the chair, mounting it to the chair makes sense.  Since it looks like a motorized chair anyway, they can just tap into that power source which is likely more convenient than having a detachable robot that needs to be charged on its own.

Not to mention something that drives around on its own has the potential to get stuck on obstacles, and if the kid can't even manipulate small objects, he wouldn't be able to get it loose if it did.


next year's engineering students could add a manipulator arm to his chair to get the robot loose.

/you aren't thinking ahead.
 
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