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(LA Times)   Airline industry rolls out perks for affluent fliers. Which pretty much means anyone who can still afford to fly   (latimes.com) divider line 24
    More: Spiffy, airline seats, Fort Worth International Airport, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, airlines, bulk box, margins, currencies, O'Hare International Airport  
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1660 clicks; posted to Business » on 28 Nov 2013 at 10:15 AM (20 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



24 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-11-28 08:01:30 AM
Photo purportedly shows "Economy" Class on PanAm in the 60's - if today's Domestic First Class was this nice we'd be stunned.
pbs.twimg.com
 
2013-11-28 09:58:38 AM

Mr. Coffee Nerves: Photo purportedly shows "Economy" Class on PanAm in the 60's - if today's Domestic First Class was this nice we'd be stunned.
[pbs.twimg.com image 599x460]


http://www.catalign.in/2010/05/prototyping-to-clarify-requirements-7 47 .html
 
2013-11-28 10:33:19 AM
after the nickel & dime approach through the recession...the only real next move is to nickel & dime those with any money left.
 
2013-11-28 10:41:16 AM
Flying first class for Thanksgiving and Christmas.  Still resentful about it.  The price difference wasn't too bad, though, compared to standard fare, especially if you plan to take advantage of the insane amount of baggage you're allowed to bring.
 
2013-11-28 10:59:47 AM
I've always found myself seated next to the effluent flyers.
 
2013-11-28 12:09:20 PM
And airline ticket prices (adjusted for inflation) have been the cheapest in history lately. OK, they are starting to rise again since '09'ish. Slightly. But when you demand the lowest possible cost, don't be surprised when feature unpacking and wage cuts make flying horrible. These days, you buy a seat. That's it. Everyone is chasing dollar signs, including you. They call it the race to the bottom.
 
2013-11-28 12:40:01 PM
If they are really affluent, won't they have their own jets?
 
2013-11-28 01:00:29 PM

sdd2000: If they are really affluent, won't they have their own jets?


They're targeting people making year $250k a year. If you're making under a million dollars a year you're not buying a private jet that can do international flights. You are however likely flying first class.
 
2013-11-28 01:37:04 PM
s3.amazonaws.com
 
2013-11-28 02:21:10 PM

Carth: sdd2000: If they are really affluent, won't they have their own jets?

They're targeting people making year $250k a year. If you're making under a million dollars a year you're not buying a private jet that can do international flights. You are however likely flying first class.


I fit in this category but couldn't imagine paying those prices for first class - ESPECIALLY on international flights.

I might use my points for an upgrade, but 8 grand for a 12 hour flight? I'd rather have my monocles polished or my Bentley waxed.
 
2013-11-28 02:31:00 PM
I got an unexpected upgrade a few weeks back.  Although the seat was (marginally) larger, the only other perq was being given two packages of peanuts and a glass of pop before take-off.

Seriously not worth the extra price, even if the extra is six bucks.
 
2013-11-28 02:36:12 PM

tillerman35: I got an unexpected upgrade a few weeks back.  Although the seat was (marginally) larger, the only other perq was being given two packages of peanuts and a glass of pop before take-off.

Seriously not worth the extra price, even if the extra is six bucks.


Pop?  I usually go for the cabernet.
 
2013-11-28 03:08:39 PM

8 inches: Carth: sdd2000: If they are really affluent, won't they have their own jets?

They're targeting people making year $250k a year. If you're making under a million dollars a year you're not buying a private jet that can do international flights. You are however likely flying first class.

I fit in this category but couldn't imagine paying those prices for first class - ESPECIALLY on international flights.

I might use my points for an upgrade, but 8 grand for a 12 hour flight? I'd rather have my monocles polished or my Bentley waxed.


If you're making that much your yearly spend should get you enough points for first class upgrades on the 2-3 international flights a year.

Assuming only 20% of your income is pointable you're still looking at around 50-100k points before flights/bonus/perks. You should easily clear 200k points a year without too much effort.
 
2013-11-28 03:11:53 PM

Carth: 8 inches: Carth: sdd2000: If they are really affluent, won't they have their own jets?

They're targeting people making year $250k a year. If you're making under a million dollars a year you're not buying a private jet that can do international flights. You are however likely flying first class.

I fit in this category but couldn't imagine paying those prices for first class - ESPECIALLY on international flights.

I might use my points for an upgrade, but 8 grand for a 12 hour flight? I'd rather have my monocles polished or my Bentley waxed.

If you're making that much your yearly spend should get you enough points for first class upgrades on the 2-3 international flights a year.

Assuming only 20% of your income is pointable you're still looking at around 50-100k points before flights/bonus/perks. You should easily clear 200k points a year without too much effort.


Biz class maybe, not first the number of miles needed keeps increasing for upgrades.
 
2013-11-28 04:49:08 PM
fs01.androidpit.info

/"More anything?"
//"More everything!"
 
2013-11-28 08:02:42 PM
I usually fly first or business on my infrequent domestic flights, mainly because I can check bags for free and there's much less of a hassle at the airport (free food and drink is a plus too).  The difference in price isn't that bad for domestic flights, but yeah, international is insane.
 
2013-11-28 10:00:34 PM

Carth: sdd2000: If they are really affluent, won't they have their own jets?

They're targeting people making year $250k a year. If you're making under a million dollars a year you're not buying a private jet that can do international flights. You are however likely flying first class.


Fractional ownership, chartering, and air taxi are options if you'd be moving 6-8 people at a time, including international flights. There's a break even point where it's cheaper and easier to fly private vs first class, and sometimes air taxi and puddle jump between cities that would otherwise be several hours of driving from airports with regular service.
 
2013-11-28 10:29:11 PM

wildcardjack: Carth: sdd2000: If they are really affluent, won't they have their own jets?

They're targeting people making year $250k a year. If you're making under a million dollars a year you're not buying a private jet that can do international flights. You are however likely flying first class.

Fractional ownership, chartering, and air taxi are options if you'd be moving 6-8 people at a time, including international flights. There's a break even point where it's cheaper and easier to fly private vs first class, and sometimes air taxi and puddle jump between cities that would otherwise be several hours of driving from airports with regular service.


Or where an overnight stay due to timing of flights would be needed the number of people for a breakeven may drop to 3-4 people. BTDT
 
2013-11-29 02:00:57 AM
You guys are not inspiring me for the day when I finally have enough frequent flyer miles to get a ticket somewhere...
 
2013-11-29 04:34:01 AM
Seems slightly weird to cite $250K/yr household income in talking about "high-value" "international first-class" *leisure* travellers. If it's a couple travelling a couple of times per year, that's already about 20% of their net income on farking airline tickets.
 
2013-11-29 05:51:34 AM
Don't worry, the airlines are balancing out this perk-giving by taking perks away from their lower-value customers.

Until this year, if you flew 25,000 miles a year or 30 flights on Delta or United, you were silver or whatever they called it.

Starting next year, you have to fly that much  and spend $2,500 doing it.  Oh, and some or most partner flights might not count toward those totals.  Similar ratios are in place for higher tiers, so if you fly 50,000 miles but only spend $4,500, you're not gold, you're silver.

All this just helps make sure there's space up front for the high-rollers.  (And to a lesser extent, for poor schmucks like me who can't afford to fly, but have mouths to feed and bills to pay and thus jump at any opportunity for short-term work, even in countries that are just one uprising away from a Fark headline.)
 
2013-11-29 12:38:09 PM

dbirchall: Don't worry, the airlines are balancing out this perk-giving by taking perks away from their lower-value customers.

Until this year, if you flew 25,000 miles a year or 30 flights on Delta or United, you were silver or whatever they called it.

Starting next year, you have to fly that much  and spend $2,500 doing it.  Oh, and some or most partner flights might not count toward those totals.  Similar ratios are in place for higher tiers, so if you fly 50,000 miles but only spend $4,500, you're not gold, you're silver.

All this just helps make sure there's space up front for the high-rollers.  (And to a lesser extent, for poor schmucks like me who can't afford to fly, but have mouths to feed and bills to pay and thus jump at any opportunity for short-term work, even in countries that are just one uprising away from a Fark headline.)


Do baggage fees and change fees count towards the $2500? If so, things should continue as normal. :)

In all seriousness, the amount of money I costs to get to 25,000 miles should cost at least $2,500 for me.
 
2013-11-29 03:13:28 PM

Mr. Coffee Nerves: Photo purportedly shows "Economy" Class on PanAm in the 60's - if today's Domestic First Class was this nice we'd be stunned.
[pbs.twimg.com image 599x460]


Photo actually shows a design mockup of a 747 interior that was made before serious engineering work had started.  That cabin never existed.
 
2013-11-29 03:15:15 PM
We fly business class for flights over 4 hours. For domestic flights that are four hours or less, I would rather save every dollar and spend it on better hotel/dinner when I reach my destination.

Though now that I think about it, the domestic flights are always short weekend trips where I don't need luggage.

Here's why I like business (domestic) and first class (international): separate TSA lines, lounge access with wifi, free checked baggage, seats that fold into beds (I cannot sleep on a plane sitting up), and some of the food is usually edible. I once saw Vern Troyer (aka Mini-Me) standing on his scooter getting frisked by TSA at the first class checkpoint in Miami, which was random and exciting.
 
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