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(Washington Post)   The 10 best books of 2013, and you haven't read a single one of them   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 59
    More: Spiffy, vice principal, McGill University  
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9229 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Nov 2013 at 3:55 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-11-28 01:58:22 AM  
*searches for porn searches for porn searches for porn*

Yup, you were right!
 
2013-11-28 02:42:43 AM  
Someone should inform the creators of such lists that there aren't awards given for being pretentious by choosing books that focus on the mundane.

I only wish they would have included the spellbinding read The forgotten Kennedy: How JFK's third cousin forever changed doorknob manufacturing
 
2013-11-28 03:59:59 AM  
Subby is correct. Not one of those is a John Grisham, written with James Patterson, or a Janet Evanovich novel.
 
2013-11-28 04:01:07 AM  
I didn't even read the article.
 
2013-11-28 04:05:54 AM  

batlock666: I didn't even read the article.


x2

/shaking tiny fist
 
2013-11-28 04:08:43 AM  

batlock666: I didn't even read the article.


cdn.splitsider.com

Good man.
 
2013-11-28 04:10:40 AM  
Those books sound uninteresting.
 
2013-11-28 04:18:05 AM  
Your right I read everyday but have not read one of them, nor are any of them on my current to read list.
 
2013-11-28 04:19:00 AM  
Subby's right. I have not ever heard of any of these.

/currently reading Ken Bruen's latest.
 
2013-11-28 04:19:56 AM  

Langdon_777: Your right I read everyday but have not read one of them, nor are any of them on my current to read list.


You're right :p hardly a vote for my writing skills, but my reading skills are up their ;)
 
2013-11-28 04:22:10 AM  
Ok the nonfiction are added to my list. First I have to complete the 1999 list then 2000 then...
 
2013-11-28 04:22:45 AM  
Absolutely zero science fiction or books about the history of cryptology? By zeus you're right, I've never even heard of any of those utter wastes of toner and dead trees.

On the other hand, I recently had an opportunity to go to the original Powell's books, and cleaned out their Retief of the CDT section, Robert's Rules of Order section, and the last full softcover set they had of Varley's Titan trilogy.
 
2013-11-28 04:30:40 AM  
Two.  I have only read two.
 
2013-11-28 04:41:30 AM  
The list is bullshiat without Detroit: An American Autopsy
 
2013-11-28 04:48:54 AM  
Going Clear by Lawrence Wright was fascinating. It really show how massively farked up Hubbard was and Miscavige is.
 
2013-11-28 04:52:09 AM  

shintochick: Going Clear by Lawrence Wright was fascinating. It really show how massively farked up Hubbard was and Miscavige is.


Don't think I need to read another book to know that, I already read Dianetics :)
 
2013-11-28 04:52:10 AM  
The 6 books in the Booker shortlist this year, at the point the list was announced, had sold, collectively, 30,000 copies. Most had been out for close to a year.

That's an average of 5000 copies. Or probably around £4000 total earnings per author. For six of the best books written in the English language this year.

It's rather sad.
 
2013-11-28 04:53:39 AM  
I have read one of them, Going Clear. It was a really good look inside Scientology, and things were even weirder than I thought. In particular, I never knew that L. Ron was close friends with Jack Parsons and had helped him with the Babalon Working before Hubbard stole his boat, his mistress, and tens of thousands of dollars of cash (and that Aleister Crowley tried to war Parsons that Hubbard was bad news, but Parsons didn't listen). Plus, I had always thought that David  Miscavige was simply a Hubbard-style con man, and I had no idea just how mentally ill he seems to be. He apparently will fly into a rage at the smallest perceived insult and will start physicallyassaulting people in the Church for almost no reason. It's just really scary that so many people findspiritualmeaning in something so ludicrous. It really shakes what little doubt I had that maybe someamazing things happened at the dawn of traditional religions the we just don't know about andthat is the reason they endured formillennia.
 
2013-11-28 04:57:34 AM  
I've got this on the go at the moment. It's beautifully written. It's one of those books I'll be sad to finish as it is just such a pleasure to read.
 
2013-11-28 04:58:37 AM  
And the cover image is thrown away...

It's The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman.
 
2013-11-28 05:10:01 AM  

thisispete: And the cover image is thrown away...

It's The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman.


Now a Neil Gaiman book I can get into (added to list.)
 
2013-11-28 05:13:39 AM  
I'm currently reading a book from 1954 (on one kindle) and a book from 1988 (on another kindle), I'll get to 2013 books in a few decades or so.

fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net
// before I loaded books onto the paperwhite, I use that one at home, while the kindle 3 gets used at work.
 
2013-11-28 05:20:20 AM  
If I haven't read them, they're obviously not the best books of 2013.
 
2013-11-28 05:27:43 AM  

lordargent: I'm currently reading a book from 1954 (on one kindle) and a book from 1988 (on another kindle), I'll get to 2013 books in a few decades or so.

[fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net image 850x478]
// before I loaded books onto the paperwhite, I use that one at home, while the kindle 3 gets used at work.


Take your time.
2.bp.blogspot.com
You have all the time in the world.
 
2013-11-28 05:29:12 AM  

Langdon_777: shintochick: Going Clear by Lawrence Wright was fascinating. It really show how massively farked up Hubbard was and Miscavige is.

Don't think I need to read another book to know that, I already read Dianetics :)


I read about half of "Going Clear" before I realized I already knew Hubbard was an inveterate liar and Scientology was bullshiat. Also the library wanted it back.
 
2013-11-28 05:43:10 AM  
List fails without George R.R. Martin's The Winds of Winter, which hasn't come out yet and it's November.
 
2013-11-28 06:11:04 AM  

red5ish: List fails without George R.R. Martin's The Winds of Winter, which hasn't come out yet and it's November.


He is making enough money now off of TV to not bother finishing the story for awhile (the bastard) :D
 
2013-11-28 06:11:17 AM  
Well, there was no military sci-fi or playfully pulp fantasy on that list, so why would I have read any of them?
 
2013-11-28 06:13:32 AM  

Langdon_777: red5ish: List fails without George R.R. Martin's The Winds of Winter, which hasn't come out yet and it's November.

He is making enough money now off of TV to not bother finishing the story for awhile (the bastard) :D


I don't think he intends to finish. I made it three novels in after a friend recommended it to me in 2007 - exactly as far as I made it into Jordan's Wheel of Time - before I realized that he's not aiming for a conclusion at any point in near history.
 
2013-11-28 06:17:49 AM  

starsrift: Well, there was no military sci-fi or playfully pulp fantasy on that list, so why would I have read any of them?


^^^^^

Non sciency fiction is so boring.
 
2013-11-28 06:23:47 AM  
I have read only one: How the Light Gets In. Penny's books are fantastic, and I love them. I am re-reading the whole series; working my way through the third one right now.
 
2013-11-28 06:24:52 AM  

Mad_Radhu: I have read one of them, Going Clear. It was a really good look inside Scientology, and things were even weirder than I thought. In particular, I never knew that L. Ron was close friends with Jack Parsons and had helped him with the Babalon Working before Hubbard stole his boat, his mistress, and tens of thousands of dollars of cash (and that Aleister Crowley tried to war Parsons that Hubbard was bad news, but Parsons didn't listen). Plus, I had always thought that David  Miscavige was simply a Hubbard-style con man, and I had no idea just how mentally ill he seems to be. He apparently will fly into a rage at the smallest perceived insult and will start physicallyassaulting people in the Church for almost no reason. It's just really scary that so many people findspiritualmeaning in something so ludicrous. It really shakes what little doubt I had that maybe someamazing things happened at the dawn of traditional religions the we just don't know about andthat is the reason they endured formillennia.


The only one on the list that I will get around to reading. Anything that will further expose this cult as a total fraud is worth my $$. When will they be suing to block its sale?
 
2013-11-28 06:32:42 AM  

starsrift: Langdon_777: red5ish: List fails without George R.R. Martin's The Winds of Winter, which hasn't come out yet and it's November.

He is making enough money now off of TV to not bother finishing the story for awhile (the bastard) :D

I don't think he intends to finish. I made it three novels in after a friend recommended it to me in 2007 - exactly as far as I made it into Jordan's Wheel of Time - before I realized that he's not aiming for a conclusion at any point in near history.


At least Jordan dropped dead and someone else finished it for us (someone who fell in luv with writing after starting the series in his teens :D
 
2013-11-28 07:05:10 AM  

Langdon_777: shintochick: Going Clear by Lawrence Wright was fascinating. It really show how massively farked up Hubbard was and Miscavige is.

Don't think I need to read another book to know that, I already read Dianetics :)


It's about much more than that.

Wright uses Sciencetology to point out how problematic it is to give religious groups tax exempt status. (It's what allows Sciencetology to get away with everything it does), and how religious leaders manipulate true believers.
 
2013-11-28 07:18:06 AM  

phrawgh: lordargent: I'm currently reading a book from 1954 (on one kindle) and a book from 1988 (on another kindle), I'll get to 2013 books in a few decades or so.

[fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net image 850x478]
// before I loaded books onto the paperwhite, I use that one at home, while the kindle 3 gets used at work.

Take your time.
[2.bp.blogspot.com image 500x333]
You have all the time in the world.


One of my favorite Twilight Zone episodes.  Sometimes I feel like that guy when I can't get off the Internet and wish I could me left alone and remain on line indefinitely.  Working on that problem...
 
2013-11-28 07:21:30 AM  
Guns at Last Light was worth the time.
 
2013-11-28 07:23:36 AM  

Sass-O-Rev: I have read only one: How the Light Gets In. Penny's books are fantastic, and I love them. I am re-reading the whole series; working my way through the third one right now.


I read The Beautiful Mystery (in the same series) a few months ago, and was unimpressed. I feel like I would have rather read a non-fiction book on the same subject. I also didn't quite understand how you can have a (somewhat) omniscient narrator in a mystery novel. The reader shouldn't be able to know the thoughts of the suspects, right?
 
2013-11-28 07:29:12 AM  

Langdon_777: Langdon_777: Your right I read everyday but have not read one of them, nor are any of them on my current to read list.

You're right :p hardly a vote for my writing skills, but my reading skills are up their ;)


there
 
2013-11-28 07:37:41 AM  
I fail to see how this is a list of best books this year. As others have brought up, there is no science fiction or fantasy. Some of the most beloved books people read today belong in those categories. Also some of the books that take the deepest look into what it means to be human, also belong to sci-fi/fantasy.  There is also a distinct lack of the hardest genre to write in, Comedy. Instead we get a handful of mystery, drama, and one more book on ww1 as if there had not been enough written to date on either world war.

Yes, I have not read any of these books, but I would also not hesitate to point out, they are probably not the best/most profound/enjoyable books of the year.
 
2013-11-28 07:47:57 AM  
Thank You For Your Service should be a mandatory read for anyone of voting age, in my opinion.
 
2013-11-28 07:57:38 AM  

drambuie: Sass-O-Rev: I have read only one: How the Light Gets In. Penny's books are fantastic, and I love them. I am re-reading the whole series; working my way through the third one right now.

I read The Beautiful Mystery (in the same series) a few months ago, and was unimpressed. I feel like I would have rather read a non-fiction book on the same subject. I also didn't quite understand how you can have a (somewhat) omniscient narrator in a mystery novel. The reader shouldn't be able to know the thoughts of the suspects, right?


I never thought of it that way. I don't know if there's a "should" as to what the reader can or cannot be privy to in terms of the characters' thoughts, motives, etc. But I do enjoy the books-- they're keeping me entertained.
 
2013-11-28 08:04:22 AM  
Two for me, Constellation of Native Phenomena and The Lowland (which should have been on the list).  Constellation is pretty much just brilliant, a great debut, and Lowland is the usual wonderful Lahiri novel.
 
2013-11-28 08:14:37 AM  
Palahniuk's Doomed. That is all.
 
2013-11-28 08:59:47 AM  
List fails without
i56.photobucket.com
 
2013-11-28 09:00:52 AM  
I don't know why people act surprised.

Literary critics only consider so-called "literary fiction" when awarding prizes and making best of lists. "Genre fiction" (SF, fantasy, mystery, spy, western, etc) might as well not even exist. They are not considered. It doesn't matter I how well-written or worthy they are.

Those of you waiting for a work of science fiction or fantasy to show up on one of these lists are going to be waiting for a long, long time.
 
2013-11-28 09:04:33 AM  

dstanley: Guns at Last Light was worth the time.


Word.  All three books of the Liberation Trilogy are magnificent.
 
2013-11-28 09:23:10 AM  
The Good Lord Bird was excellent (but then James McBride is one of my favorite authors). The Son is still on hold at the library. I've heard it is in a similar vein as a Larry McMurtry novel.
 
2013-11-28 10:45:18 AM  
I beg to differ.  I just read a book that came out last month and it's not on this list.  It started "Dear Penthouse, My girlfriend, her younger sister and I were having a few drinks by the fireplace.  Beth, her sister, suggested we play a game.  She asked if we had any baby oil and a bungee cord..."
 
2013-11-28 10:48:11 AM  

thornhill: Langdon_777: shintochick: Going Clear by Lawrence Wright was fascinating. It really show how massively farked up Hubbard was and Miscavige is.

Don't think I need to read another book to know that, I already read Dianetics :)

It's about much more than that.

Wright uses Sciencetology to point out how problematic it is to give religious groups tax exempt status. (It's what allows Sciencetology to get away with everything it does), and how religious leaders manipulate true believers.


Oh that doesn't need another book either - only the clearly for charity arms of religious groups should be tax exempt, the rest should be treated like businesses. Scientology is one of the worse and the Catholic Church isn't far behind.
 
2013-11-28 11:32:24 AM  
I mostly read non-fiction, but when I see titles like "How the Light Gets In" or "The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie", it only reaffirms that preference. I know I'm probably missing out on some great literature, but those titles just sound pandering and far too deliberate.
 
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