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(Neatorama)   Remember when drinking radioactive water was a cure for all that ails you? Good times   (neatorama.com) divider line 55
    More: Scary, University of Vienna, cough medicine, radiologists, cure  
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4937 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Nov 2013 at 12:16 PM (20 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-11-27 12:07:46 PM
25.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-11-27 12:19:24 PM
If you drink enough of it, you won't have any problems at all.
 
2013-11-27 12:22:39 PM
Can't access it at work apparently.

/of course I'm on school dist interwebs. :P
 
2013-11-27 12:25:05 PM
guides.gamepressure.com
 
2013-11-27 12:26:03 PM
I live not too far from the factory that made this stuff. You want to read more about it, google The Radium Girls.

Back in the 90's, they found out a bunch if houses in the town next to me were built over the radium dump from that plant. The EPA says its all been cleaned up now - but who the hell knows what else is buried out there
 
2013-11-27 12:26:22 PM
"Radium ... a different radioactive element altogether."
 
2013-11-27 12:27:58 PM
what's a little fallout eh?

www.seektress.com
 
2013-11-27 12:29:34 PM
It's not? I just switched to radioactive water from leeches. Guess I need to find something else.

/Looks like I can go back to leeches for the moment.
 
2013-11-27 12:30:45 PM
uploads.neatorama.com
NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE
 
2013-11-27 12:30:48 PM
Pernicious nonsense!

cdn.crooksandliars.com

/radioactively hot.
 
2013-11-27 12:31:36 PM
Frack first, then irradiate. Wipe on head daily as a cure for baldness. It works!
 
2013-11-27 12:32:12 PM
I remember back in the good old days they made cocktails out of DDT. Radioactive water isn't sound as cool since there is no alcohol involved. Radioactive DDT cocktails though...
 
2013-11-27 12:33:02 PM
Radium, the element that Marie Curie researched.  Which in the end killed her.... And also, Got her a radioactive element named after herself
 
2013-11-27 12:34:07 PM
And this is why we need to gut the FDA.  The Free Market would have taken care of this.

/Poe
//Yes, millions of people actually believe this
 
2013-11-27 12:34:50 PM

Ambitwistor: [uploads.neatorama.com image 600x483]
NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE


Why not? It's guaranteed to be perfectly harmless. Says so right on the box.
 
2013-11-27 12:35:14 PM
Nope. That was before my time. These scientific fads come and go. Some of them are a lot older than I am.

Remember when everybody was hunting for uranium? Everybody from Laurel and Hardy to the Marx Brothers was finding a priceless uranium mine there for a while.

How about the Golden Age of Pneumatic? Everything was pneumatic, from cars to blondes.

And the Age of the Tail Fin? They put tail fins on everything from El Dorados to clocks. Why would you put tail fins on clocks? Because you wanted to see time fly. Ha! ha! Got you!

When I was a kid, there was a fad for astronauts. Everybody was for rocketing off into space. There were space operas, space westerns, space horror movies, teen astronauts, even Abbott and Costello went to Mars, although they seem to have been somewhat confused about exactly where Mars was.

And almost every new science fad becomes a health fad. Nowadays a lot of health crapola is "quantum" or "energy" based. Once it would have been magnetic or electric.

Cranks and crooks follow the fashions set by science and technology just like the rest of us.
 
2013-11-27 12:35:28 PM

untaken_name: Ambitwistor: [uploads.neatorama.com image 600x483]
NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE

Why not? It's guaranteed to be perfectly harmless. Says so right on the box.


Guaranteed for the life of the user...
 
2013-11-27 12:36:30 PM
And this is why we need to gut the FDA.  The Free Market would have taken care of this.

/Poe
//Yes, millions of people actually believe this



The government will protect us all.
//yes, millions of people believe this
 
2013-11-27 12:37:26 PM
ts3.mm.bing.net
Little radiation never hurt anybody.
 
2013-11-27 12:39:32 PM

doubled99: And this is why we need to gut the FDA.  The Free Market would have taken care of this.

/Poe
//Yes, millions of people actually believe this


The government will protect us all.
//yes, millions of people believe this


Look, if rich white guys on the "government regulator to industry board member with a sinecure" carousel can't be trusted, who the hell can be?
 
2013-11-27 12:39:39 PM
FTA: Considering that William Bailey is estimated to have sold more than 400,000 bottles of Radithor over the years, it's a wonder that more didn't die. Many were probably saved by the price: Even when it was sold by the case, Radithor cost $1.25 a bottle (around $15 in today's money). Few people would have been able to afford to consume as much as Byers had.

Before reading this I had thought that being poor saved people's lives and a lot of us wouldn't be reading this otherwise. Not that being poor is a good thing but in this case it was.
 
2013-11-27 12:43:25 PM
Monsieur Curie used to carry radioactive samples around in his pockets. That's how naive people were, even in the scientific community.

The microwave oven was invented because a guy in the labs had a chocolate bar in his pocket and it melted. There was no shielding on the solenoid.

Everything my Mother said was good for me has turned out to be a deadly poison but scientists and corporations are fighting back and reclaiming food so that Woody Allen's joke about health food in Sleeper will eventually seem like prescience rather than silliness. Even the good and honest research swings back and forth for and against everything. The stuff marketed by the Tobacco Industry or Big Wheat is even less reliable. Like those stupid paranormal experiments, mere chance will cause some studies to turn out positive and some negative. It's then a matter of taking your pick or choosing your poison, same thing.
 
2013-11-27 12:45:10 PM
Bet this was his theme song.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3973tfsllqw
 
2013-11-27 12:49:24 PM
clarksonhistory.files.wordpress.com
 
Bf+
2013-11-27 12:53:23 PM

pkrzycki: Radium, the element that Marie Curie researched.  Which in the end killed her....
And also, Got her a radioactive element named after herself



hilarygardner.files.wordpress.com
...so she's got that going for her.
 
2013-11-27 01:02:36 PM

img.fark.net


t.qkme.me

 
2013-11-27 01:06:25 PM
I was reading the old "Boxcar Children" books to my kid, and one of them ("The Mystery Ranch") is horrifying to read today, as the children discover uranium just lying around on the ground, and even used in bricks for the house they're living in.  In the book, it's just cool stuff that glows in the dark, not something that was going to kill them in weeks given the level of exposure they were getting.
 
2013-11-27 01:22:24 PM
Look, if rich white guys on the "government regulator to industry board member with a sinecure" carousel can't be trusted, who the hell can be?


Our altruistic and incorruptable elected officials?
 
2013-11-27 01:32:44 PM

doubled99: Look, if rich white guys on the "government regulator to industry board member with a sinecure" carousel can't be trusted, who the hell can be?


Our altruistic and incorruptable elected officials?


Exec 1: Profit or safety... which to put first?
Exec 2: Is it illegal to sell a product that's dangerous in this way?
Exec 1: No
Exec 2: Then profit. Our only moral duty is to maximize shareholder value. As for the consumers, Caveat Emptor.
 
2013-11-27 01:37:57 PM

Primitive Screwhead: [img.fark.net image 448x582]
[t.qkme.me image 259x194]


Mountain Dew is not made out of radioactive waste.

It is made by feeding NoDoz to diabetic horses.
 
2013-11-27 02:23:49 PM
They should watch out for that dirty water. It will give you +10 HP; however, you'll have to factor if the +6 Radiation is worth it.
 
2013-11-27 02:23:59 PM

Morpher59: I was reading the old "Boxcar Children" books to my kid, and one of them ("The Mystery Ranch") is horrifying to read today, as the children discover uranium just lying around on the ground, and even used in bricks for the house they're living in.  In the book, it's just cool stuff that glows in the dark, not something that was going to kill them in weeks given the level of exposure they were getting.


Actually, they found Pitchblende. Not exactly straight Uranium,and although it does give you greater than 70 Bq/g it is still not scary lethal in the amounts described. I remember the book quite well, and the amounts in the cabin that was described was also quite small.
 
2013-11-27 02:31:27 PM

buckler: Pernicious nonsense!

[cdn.crooksandliars.com image 460x380]

/radioactively hot.


Ever been to Utah? Ra-di-a-tion. Yes, indeed. You hear the most outrageous lies about it. Half-baked goggle-box do-gooders telling everybody it's bad for you. Pernicious nonsense. Everybody could stand a hundred chest X-rays a year. They ought to have them, too.
 
2013-11-27 02:36:54 PM
This is supposed to be The Fountain of Youth in Punta Gorda, Florida.
img.fark.net

The other side has a warning sign telling you the water is full of radium.
img.fark.net
 
2013-11-27 02:41:14 PM

TheHighlandHowler: [clarksonhistory.files.wordpress.com image 400x311]


Shoe-fitting fluoroscope.  Evidently it was vastly more difficult to determine if a child's shoe actually fit back in the good ol' days. I suppose that would justify a 170 mrem/shot dose to everyone around it just to make sure little Billy's Buster Browns were comfy.

Figure that little Billy was fine, but the poor schlub sales clerk firing that thing off 20, 30 times a day probably didn't hold up so well.
 
2013-11-27 02:51:06 PM
I'm fascinated by old radioactive items. Most of that stuff is not nearly as dangerous as you're lead to believe half the time. (Pun intended.)

Radium water, food, and suppositories are absolutely dangerous. You don't want to be ingesting it. The line at the end about not buying the bottles? Hogwash. As long as it's on a shelf out of the way it's probably going to be less radiation than a banana or a trans-Atlantic flight.

The Radium Girls episode is troubling and a good lesson, but that doesn't make radium watches and clocks dangerous. That was a very useful invention and it's a shame we can't have luminescent dials. It saved many lives in WWII.

We're so paranoid about it that we don't allow tritium key-chains in the U.S. even though most of the world sells them as novelties.

Unfortunately, that's the era we live in. Lead, asbestos, mercury, radium, and other substances that we overused or abused with reckless abandon at one time have become boogeymen. I'd hate to see that happen again, but we're a society of emotion over reason.

One last thing: anyone remember Mercurochrome?

4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-11-27 02:52:11 PM
Alkaline water biatches!!!
 
2013-11-27 02:57:09 PM

bearcats1983: They should watch out for that dirty water.


jamesostafford.files.wordpress.com

Frown upon your shenanigans
 
2013-11-27 03:03:20 PM
I was just reading about radioactive quackery the other day. A ,ot like all these 'alternative medicines' of today.
 
2013-11-27 03:03:45 PM

washington-babylon: Morpher59: I was reading the old "Boxcar Children" books to my kid, and one of them ("The Mystery Ranch") is horrifying to read today, as the children discover uranium just lying around on the ground, and even used in bricks for the house they're living in.  In the book, it's just cool stuff that glows in the dark, not something that was going to kill them in weeks given the level of exposure they were getting.

Actually, they found Pitchblende. Not exactly straight Uranium,and although it does give you greater than 70 Bq/g it is still not scary lethal in the amounts described. I remember the book quite well, and the amounts in the cabin that was described was also quite small.


I found the book, and they're pretty clearly described as "yellow rocks", which make it more likely to have been Carnotite.  It looks like 1kg of Carnotite will get you 1291 mRem/hr.
 
2013-11-27 03:24:56 PM

doubled99: And this is why we need to gut the FDA.  The Free Market would have taken care of this.

/Poe
//Yes, millions of people actually believe this


The government will protect us all.
//yes, millions of people believe this


The article explains that the FDA had very little power back on the early 20th century and so could not have stopped the sale of radioactive water.
 
2013-11-27 03:33:51 PM
You'd think with these goons messing around with radium for the first 20 years of the 20th Century, we'd all be either X-Men or bald corpses by now.
 
2013-11-27 03:34:50 PM

buckler: Pernicious nonsense!

[cdn.crooksandliars.com image 460x380]

/radioactively hot.


I LOVE Lorna Doones!
 
2013-11-27 03:43:29 PM

Morpher59: washington-babylon: Morpher59: I was reading the old "Boxcar Children" books to my kid, and one of them ("The Mystery Ranch") is horrifying to read today, as the children discover uranium just lying around on the ground, and even used in bricks for the house they're living in.  In the book, it's just cool stuff that glows in the dark, not something that was going to kill them in weeks given the level of exposure they were getting.

Actually, they found Pitchblende. Not exactly straight Uranium,and although it does give you greater than 70 Bq/g it is still not scary lethal in the amounts described. I remember the book quite well, and the amounts in the cabin that was described was also quite small.

I found the book, and they're pretty clearly described as "yellow rocks", which make it more likely to have been Carnotite.  It looks like 1kg of Carnotite will get you 1291 mRem/hr.


Hmm. That would be correct from the description, however the printing I had specifically used the word "Pitchblende" which was my first introduction to that word at the time, resulting in a bit of research to find out what it meant. Granted, my printing was old and probably got updated somewhere along the way. Still, Carnotite would fit the description better and would be considerably more dangerous.

/I love old books
//Bought a first edition second printing of "The Glob" Illustrated by Walt Kelly (of Pogo fame).
///For 10 bucks in almost mint condition.
 
2013-11-27 04:08:53 PM

draa: FTA: Considering that William Bailey is estimated to have sold more than 400,000 bottles of Radithor over the years, it's a wonder that more didn't die. Many were probably saved by the price: Even when it was sold by the case, Radithor cost $1.25 a bottle (around $15 in today's money). Few people would have been able to afford to consume as much as Byers had.

Before reading this I had thought that being poor saved people's lives and a lot of us wouldn't be reading this otherwise. Not that being poor is a good thing but in this case it was.


Good thing Whole Foods wasn't around then; it would have been sold by the case.
 
2013-11-27 04:17:52 PM
World's best non-carcinogenic beer:
4.bp.blogspot.com
/it's the water
 
2013-11-27 05:28:03 PM
No, but I remember when it was a Curie-all for all that ails you.
 
2013-11-27 05:28:22 PM
This reminds me of people drinking ionized water.
 
2013-11-27 06:01:34 PM

The Irresponsible Captain: I'm fascinated by old radioactive items. Most of that stuff is not nearly as dangerous as you're lead to believe half the time. (Pun intended.)

Radium water, food, and suppositories are absolutely dangerous. You don't want to be ingesting it. The line at the end about not buying the bottles? Hogwash. As long as it's on a shelf out of the way it's probably going to be less radiation than a banana or a trans-Atlantic flight.

The Radium Girls episode is troubling and a good lesson, but that doesn't make radium watches and clocks dangerous. That was a very useful invention and it's a shame we can't have luminescent dials. It saved many lives in WWII.

We're so paranoid about it that we don't allow tritium key-chains in the U.S. even though most of the world sells them as novelties.

Unfortunately, that's the era we live in. Lead, asbestos, mercury, radium, and other substances that we overused or abused with reckless abandon at one time have become boogeymen. I'd hate to see that happen again, but we're a society of emotion over reason.

One last thing: anyone remember Mercurochrome?

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 230x320]


Good Lord, yes.  My parents used that stuff on me for every cut, scrape, and bruise.  Privine nose drops was the cure for all respiratory events.  After I became a teenager, I didn't seem to have the need for either.  So, by the time I was on my own and got sick, the druggist looked at me funny when I would ask for either one.
 
2013-11-27 06:04:12 PM
Let's hear it for radioactive water!

Ra! Ra! Ra!
 
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