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(Social Reader)   It's a "permanent reality-show" where all the cashiers, barbers, waiters and waitresses in this quaint town are trained in handling the disease. Even the medical staff can play the part of domestic staff   (socialreader.com) divider line 27
    More: Interesting, domestic worker, Alzheimer's Disease, college town, urban areas, waiting lists, diseases, crystal chandeliers  
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6981 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 Nov 2013 at 2:06 PM (39 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



27 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-11-26 12:05:18 PM
That's....actually really cool.
 
2013-11-26 12:13:44 PM
No kidding. Wonder if it would have applications with other mental problems (like schizophrenia?)
 
2013-11-26 12:28:40 PM
Love it.
 
2013-11-26 01:05:48 PM
Kreist, I wish I had had this option for my Gran.  What a great idea.
 
2013-11-26 01:20:26 PM
Very, very cool.
 
2013-11-26 01:45:18 PM
I would love this for my parents, if they ever need it. I can see even now, when they are still in the 60s and active how important daily stimulation, friends and family and familiarity is to them.
 
2013-11-26 02:04:52 PM
I remember when my grandparents had to be put into a nursing home- a pretty nice one, as far as these things go, but my grandmother - who was physically healthy but senile- didn't understand why she was there and my grandfather- who was mentally sharp but dying of liver cancer- was crushed because he could no longer take of her, and desperately worried that she would outlive him by 10-20 years, in that horrible place.

As it turns out, she had a stroke and died quietly in her sleep 6 weeks after he finally succumbed to cancer. I wonder if she would have held on longer if she was in a place like this. I know his final months would have been less stressful.

/sad story, sis.
 
2013-11-26 02:12:04 PM
"I am number 2."
"Who is number 1?"
"You are number 6."
 
2013-11-26 02:15:23 PM
According to the article, residents live 2.5 years longer on average compared to a normal institution, and this 'village' receives 2,200 euros per month for each resident. So this is all an elaborate scam to keep the cash rolling in a bit longer by keeping residents alive longer.
 
2013-11-26 02:21:54 PM
How log is the waiting list?
 
2013-11-26 02:22:31 PM

dj_bigbird: No kidding. Wonder if it would have applications with other mental problems (like schizophrenia?)


That would be brilliant.
as well.
 
2013-11-26 02:22:57 PM

CokeBear: According to the article, residents live 2.5 years longer on average compared to a normal institution, and this 'village' receives 2,200 euros per month for each resident. So this is all an elaborate scam to keep the cash rolling in a bit longer by keeping residents alive longer.


Yup, its all a scam.

methinks I just got tolled
 
2013-11-26 02:25:00 PM
soooo... Dentonvale?

cps-static.rovicorp.com
 
2013-11-26 02:27:23 PM
I'm feelin' this. So many of my patients and relatives could use a facility that maintains a decent quality of life / to be treated as a human until death.

I planned on wandering into the Aokigahara forest and dying when my time came. Somehow this seems more pleasant.
 
2013-11-26 02:32:20 PM

SordidEuphemism: "I am number 2."
"Who is number 1?"
"You are number 6."


I am not a number!! I am a free man!!!
 
2013-11-26 02:34:36 PM
I'd like a Big Fish version of this place, where they tell the folks with Alzheimer's all sorts of tall tales about their lives to let them die thinking they were incredible, amazing people. "Yes Gertrude, you were the first woman on the moon, and all the boys wanted a kiss when you came back down in a parachute. Martin, did I ever tell you that not only did you win the gold medal for high jump in 1954, one time you saved an entire town in Missouri by punching a T-Rex in the face."
 
2013-11-26 02:36:01 PM
This is the most uplifting thing I've read in a long time. (I really hope this isn't fake.)

I lost my grandfather to altzeimers. It's something I fear happening to me one day, and if I knew that I would end up in a place like that, not to mention any elderly relatives of mine, that would give me so much peace.

We need to make this the norm.
 
2013-11-26 03:11:31 PM
Boy, that socialized medicine is a nightmare...a beautiful, humane, honorable nightmare.
 
2013-11-26 03:22:09 PM
Let's see what happens when a population of paranoid schizophrenics is introduced.
 
2013-11-26 03:28:08 PM
I remember reading, years ago, about a town in the Netherlands or maybe Belgium that welcomed people with all sorts of mental issues.  The patients were encouraged to do whatever would ease their tortured minds.  They seemed to do better, and the families also had less stress from trying to be caregivers.  Even Hitler supposedly left it alone.  I wish I could remember enough, or maybe my Google fu is just weak today.
 
2013-11-26 04:14:22 PM
We lost my grandmother to this and it was just sad. It is the one thing my mom deathly fears of getting as she gets older. I hope in my lifetime they figure out a way to beat Alzheimers.
 
2013-11-26 04:19:55 PM
This is an awesome idea! My father has dementia, and the main reason that we keep him at home (which can be trying at times) is that I have lots of experience with facilities in my capacity as a hospice nurse and I know he would not do well at all. Dad cannot handle structure of any kind and would be violent if forced to have meals at a certain time or if he could not go where he wanted to, when he wanted to.
 
2013-11-26 04:58:26 PM
There was a dementia-care home in the NW where my sister worked for a while that would, every few days, stage an event in the main room - graduation, wedding, birthday party, whatever. The employees got to act in what amounted to a little play, and the residents got to dress up & enjoy whatever the fragments of their memory could conjure up.

This seems like that on a grand scale. Brilliant, and well done.
 
2013-11-26 05:08:48 PM
2.bp.blogspot.com

How wonderful that there are still kind caring people in the world.
 
2013-11-26 06:17:39 PM

vudukungfu: dj_bigbird: No kidding. Wonder if it would have applications with other mental problems (like schizophrenia?)

That would be brilliant.
as well.


I'm not so sure. Take a patient with paranoid schizophrenia and put them in a supposedly 'normal' environment where all the worker, who are suppose to be unconnected from each other, know who the patient is?
 
2013-11-26 07:02:26 PM
This idea is amazing. With the correct mindset of the employees it doesn't sound much more complicated than a traditional nursing home, but the residents are given the illusion of more freedom.

Simply brilliant.

/Almost weeping now--mom is starting to lose it.
 
2013-11-27 01:03:19 AM
Where's the story about setting up a fake bus stop to humanely trap them?  Seems like a lot less work than this Trumanesque setup.
 
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