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(Daily Mail)   Man so sensitive to cold that he can never have a single chilled beer without risking his life. Fortunately he lives in England, which never got the hang of 'cold' beer (pics)   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 53
    More: Interesting, temperatures, Mr Ward  
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4042 clicks; posted to Geek » on 25 Nov 2013 at 12:57 PM (34 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-11-25 01:04:08 PM
Did you know that if you refrigerate Coors Light, it gets cold? This is apparently not true for other brands.
 
2013-11-25 01:06:43 PM
We do chill our beers in the UK. We just don't chill them down to near freezing to hide any hint of taste like what happens in the US.

Still trying to figure out the frosty glass trend in at least in North Carolina. Why would you want all that ice falling off in your beer?
 
2013-11-25 01:06:48 PM

Hollie Maea: Did you know that if you refrigerate Coors Light, it gets cold? This is apparently not true for other brands.


It's brewed cold and shipped cold, that's why it tastes so cold.
 
2013-11-25 01:08:35 PM

MugzyBrown: Hollie Maea: Did you know that if you refrigerate Coors Light, it gets cold? This is apparently not true for other brands.

It's brewed cold and shipped cold, that's why it tastes so cold.


www.adweek.com
 
2013-11-25 01:08:43 PM

limeyfellow: We do chill our beers in the UK. We just don't chill them down to near freezing to hide any hint of taste like what happens in the US.

Still trying to figure out the frosty glass trend in at least in North Carolina. Why would you want all that ice falling off in your beer?


We tend to get sun in between our clouds in the US, so sometimes we enjoy a cold beverage.

If done properly, the frosted mug will have its ice on the outside rather than the inside.

/Don't usually drink my beer ice cold
//Sometimes a light bodied, cold beer on a hot day is perfect.
 
2013-11-25 01:13:43 PM
so he sits there with an open fridge... drinking cold water out of the fridge?

his insides are magically  immune to his immune system be forked up?

umm.. no peg.  dont think so
 
2013-11-25 01:15:40 PM
We prefer beer with a flavour that isn't simply just 'cold'. God forbid it should be wet and flavoursome.
 
2013-11-25 01:16:51 PM
So a mentally ill person with a psychosomatic illness then.

Got it.
 
2013-11-25 01:19:50 PM
So why doesn't he move somewhere warm? Surely it would be better for him in the long run.

Unless of course this is just more Daily Fail b.s.
 
2013-11-25 01:20:58 PM
This snowflake on snowflake violence must end!
 
2013-11-25 01:22:09 PM

Whatthefark: So why doesn't he move somewhere warm? Surely it would be better for him in the long run.

Unless of course this is just more Daily Fail b.s.


He should try getting a hot girlfriend.
 
2013-11-25 01:35:12 PM
A friend completed an aggressive round of chemo and one of the things they gave her made her super cold all the time.  Drinking anything above room temperature made her throat close up.  It was a known side effect.

She's a tiny woman to begin with.  Her feet and hands were like ice.  It's been about 8 months since she's been off that poison, and the cold problem is just starting to ease up.
 
2013-11-25 01:38:29 PM
I call bullshiat.
 
2013-11-25 01:42:04 PM
Mr Ward must wear gloves to touch anything cold. He said: 'Having cold drinks made my throat swell and even holding a pint of cold beer on a night out made my hand swell up'

i.dailymail.co.uk


So of course he keeps the water pitcher in the fridge...
 
2013-11-25 01:42:59 PM

SpectroBoy: So a mentally ill person with a psychosomatic illness then.

Got it.


http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cold-urticaria/DS01160
 
2013-11-25 01:46:01 PM

MugzyBrown: Hollie Maea: Did you know that if you refrigerate Coors Light, it gets cold? This is apparently not true for other brands.

It's brewed cold and shipped cold, that's why it tastes so cold.


Yeah, that must be it.
 
2013-11-25 01:46:20 PM

Phatteh: We prefer beer with a flavour that isn't simply just 'cold'. God forbid it should be wet and flavoursome.


Real Beer is best served at room temperature, at least that was what my Landlord in Germany told me when he introduced me to one of the beers local to the Bad Kreuznach area.
 
2013-11-25 01:50:01 PM
Waiting for the bus at -10C? That's 14F, which is indeed cold, but damn, son. That's hardly cold that will never leave your bones.
 
2013-11-25 01:52:22 PM

SpectroBoy: So a mentally ill person with a psychosomatic illness then.

Got it.


Psst.  Your ignorance is showing.  Might want to do something about that.
 
2013-11-25 01:54:26 PM
Cool. I've gotta go in at some point and find out if I have PLE (polymorphous light eruptions) or solar urticaria. Only seems to happen under specific circumstances--something about car windows or windows in general?--but I get a similar flushing but far more extensive when I get emotional. I also get nauseated, but I'd attributed that to motion sickness as I can't read in cars without setting off the symptoms. Not sure if the flush comes first or if it's triggered by motion sickness. . .

/oh for want of good healthcare
 
2013-11-25 01:56:24 PM

limeyfellow: We do chill our beers in the UK. We just don't chill them down to near freezing to hide any hint of taste like what happens in the US.

Still trying to figure out the frosty glass trend in at least in North Carolina. Why would you want all that ice falling off in your beer?


see, we have this thing called summer in North America.
 
2013-11-25 02:11:43 PM
A friend of mine just got back from London and commented on how amazing the beers were over there, so I am getting a kick out of this thread.

And for what it is worth, 50-57F (the serving temps for most British beer) is plenty cold.
 
2013-11-25 02:17:40 PM
I've always likened drinking cold beer like eating cold cheese... it has to be warmer to bring out the flavor nuances.

And drinking room temperature ales is one reason English darters are superior... ever try to throw a dart after holding a cold beer in your hand?

Though I do like Guinness Extra Cold:

i1331.photobucket.com
 
2013-11-25 02:30:58 PM

ellipses: And drinking room temperature ales is one reason English darters are superior... ever try to throw a dart after holding a cold beer in your hand?


Of course, an alternative strategy would be to not drink copious amounts of alcoholic beverages while competing in throwing sets of three very sharp things across rooms toward small targets.

As for the dude in this article, I've half a mind to ship him to Saskatoon in February just to watch his body explode.
 
2013-11-25 02:39:43 PM

Suckmaster Burstingfoam: ellipses: And drinking room temperature ales is one reason English darters are superior... ever try to throw a dart after holding a cold beer in your hand?

Of course, an alternative strategy would be to not drink copious amounts of alcoholic beverages while competing in throwing sets of three very sharp things across rooms toward small targets.

As for the dude in this article, I've half a mind to ship him to Saskatoon in February just to watch his body explode.


You're kidding, right?? I was in a dart league in Montana when i was stationed there in the AF. It seemed that nobody could get their game on until a minimum of 5 beers were in them. Hell, the guy that won the big yearly tournament was swaying back and forth after several beers and 5 or 6 shots. He says that he aims at the bullseye in the middle.
 
2013-11-25 02:44:59 PM
He's British.  Not like he can't move to Spain like half of his countrymen.
 
2013-11-25 03:12:18 PM

Suckmaster Burstingfoam: ellipses: And drinking room temperature ales is one reason English darters are superior... ever try to throw a dart after holding a cold beer in your hand?

Of course, an alternative strategy would be to not drink copious amounts of alcoholic beverages while competing in throwing sets of three very sharp things across rooms toward small targets.

As for the dude in this article, I've half a mind to ship him to Saskatoon in February just to watch his body explode.


Or uh... to not drink with your throwing hand. Also darts, like pool, is much easier to play after a beer or 7.
 
2013-11-25 03:14:24 PM

limeyfellow: We do chill our beers in the UK. We just don't chill them down to near freezing to hide any hint of taste like what happens in the US.

Still trying to figure out the frosty glass trend in at least in North Carolina. Why would you want all that ice falling off in your beer?


Ahem. Tenants Lager and Super. The Budweiser and Colt 45 of Britain. Don't get all beer snooty there limey, you aren't perfect either.

As to the frosted mugs (well, cold mugs actually, it's just that the humidity frosts them up almost immediately) that depends entirely where you are and what time of year it is. Unless you chug the beer down in some places it will rise 15 degrees or more in 10 minutes or less without that big cold sink giving it another 10 minutes or so. You won't see a frosted mug in places where the weather is more like London's (San Francisco for example).
 
2013-11-25 03:27:18 PM

SpectroBoy: So a mentally ill person with a psychosomatic illness then.

Got it.


Purely psychosomatic? That boy needs therapy.
 
2013-11-25 03:31:29 PM

Radioactive Ass: Unless you chug the beer down in some places it will rise 15 degrees or more in 10 minutes or less without that big cold sink giving it another 10 minutes or so. You won't see a frosted mug in places where the weather is more like London's (San Francisco for example).


That might explain things. I live in L.A. and most of the time I can't finish a bottle unless I pound it because it warms up to a disgusting sludge if I take too long (temperatures and food are a thing with me anyway). The fiance finds this amusing as he always gets my leftovers.
 
2013-11-25 04:12:36 PM
The Daily Fail seems to run a lot of these stories about people who can't laugh or they will die, or they can't sneeze or they will die. I'm thinking the dumbshiat in the photo works in their mailroom and the story is complete bullshiat.
 
2013-11-25 05:53:32 PM

Peki: That might explain things. I live in L.A. and most of the time I can't finish a bottle unless I pound it because it warms up to a disgusting sludge if I take too long (temperatures and food are a thing with me anyway). The fiance finds this amusing as he always gets my leftovers.


Freezable beer coozy.

Get a few of them so you can rotate them as they thaw out. Then tell your mooching fiance to get his own beer...
 
2013-11-25 06:44:31 PM

Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: He's British. Not like he can't move to Spain like half of his countrymen.


Or to a Commonwealth nation in the Caribbean.
 
2013-11-25 07:01:37 PM
I have a hard time believing the story, simply because of the source, but I'm not ruling it out entirely.

A number of years ago I dated someone who told me he was allergic to water.  Of course I didn't believe it, thought it was just another bullshiat lie.  But, while it may have been the only truthful thing he ever told me, sure enough, if he didn't completely dry off after a shower, got stuck in the rain or got splashed while outside watering the garden, his skin would get red and swell in the wet areas.  There's no way you can fake the evidence I saw, and I'd be very, very shocked if you could psychosomatically make splash mark shaped red, swollen bumps show up on your body in the exact spots where water was touching your skin for more than a few minutes.
 
2013-11-25 07:25:34 PM

MrHappyRotter: I have a hard time believing the story, simply because of the source, but I'm not ruling it out entirely.

A number of years ago I dated someone who told me he was allergic to water.  Of course I didn't believe it, thought it was just another bullshiat lie.  But, while it may have been the only truthful thing he ever told me, sure enough, if he didn't completely dry off after a shower, got stuck in the rain or got splashed while outside watering the garden, his skin would get red and swell in the wet areas.  There's no way you can fake the evidence I saw, and I'd be very, very shocked if you could psychosomatically make splash mark shaped red, swollen bumps show up on your body in the exact spots where water was touching your skin for more than a few minutes.


0/10 you would have scored higher if this thread was more popular
 
2013-11-25 07:54:58 PM
A literal snowflake from the snowflake generation, hilarious!
 
2013-11-25 08:13:24 PM

Radioactive Ass: Peki: That might explain things. I live in L.A. and most of the time I can't finish a bottle unless I pound it because it warms up to a disgusting sludge if I take too long (temperatures and food are a thing with me anyway). The fiance finds this amusing as he always gets my leftovers.

Freezable beer coozy.

Get a few of them so you can rotate them as they thaw out. Then tell your mooching fiance to get his own beer...


A recent study found that beer coozies actually work by keeping condensation from forming on the can/glass. When water condenses on the container, it releases massive amounts of energy and outweighs anything else that is also trying to warm up your beer.
 
2013-11-25 08:39:44 PM

Tobin_Lam: Radioactive Ass: Peki: That might explain things. I live in L.A. and most of the time I can't finish a bottle unless I pound it because it warms up to a disgusting sludge if I take too long (temperatures and food are a thing with me anyway). The fiance finds this amusing as he always gets my leftovers.

Freezable beer coozy.

Get a few of them so you can rotate them as they thaw out. Then tell your mooching fiance to get his own beer...

A recent study found that beer coozies actually work by keeping condensation from forming on the can/glass. When water condenses on the container, it releases massive amounts of energy and outweighs anything else that is also trying to warm up your beer.


Yeah. Condensation/evaporation are huge suckers of energy, so I can see how converting the air to drops of water seriously sucks the cold out of the bottle. I'll have to check on that.

/works on A/C systems for cars, not sure why she didn't think of that first
//fiance isn't mooching if I wouldn't drink it anyway
 
2013-11-25 09:31:04 PM
Fascinating. I'd never heard of someone having an actual allergy to cold before.

Raynaud's Disease, I know more about. Folks sometimes explain it as a "cold allergy" because it's a useful metaphor and shorthand, but the mechanism is different (Raynaud's is a circulatory problem, not an immune problem). But that's not what this is: it sounds more like this is an actual misfiring immune response.
 
2013-11-25 09:43:53 PM
A kid from elementary school used to break out in hives if he got in a swimming pool that was too cold.

But this shiat seems obnoxiously fake, blowing something minor out of proportion.

Though I might claim to have this if it kept my girlfriend from touching me with her ice cold hands in the winter.
 
2013-11-25 09:53:26 PM

Peki: Cool. I've gotta go in at some point and find out if I have PLE (polymorphous light eruptions) or solar urticaria. Only seems to happen under specific circumstances--something about car windows or windows in general?--but I get a similar flushing but far more extensive when I get emotional. I also get nauseated, but I'd attributed that to motion sickness as I can't read in cars without setting off the symptoms. Not sure if the flush comes first or if it's triggered by motion sickness. . .

/oh for want of good healthcare


Gastrointestinal problems like nausea can be common with allergic and non-allergic histamine reactions. Think about meds like Pepcid or Zantac - they are H2 (Histamine 2) blockers. Check out this report, there's a good chart that shows how symptoms that can be caused by excess histamine http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/85/5/1185.full.

I started getting hives in July, and was finally diagnosed with chronic idiopathic urticaria, primarily pressure and delayed-pressure urticaria. All the diagnosis got me was, "we don't really know what's causing it, we can only (somewhat) treat the symptoms." I'm finally not covered in hives every day, but I still break out from time to time. Not saying I wouldn't recommend you get checked out, but don't get your hopes up. Rarely, urticaria can be caused by more serious issues, to it's worth getting checked out if for not other reason than to rule those out.

This is a good overview of urticaria -  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2492902/
 
2013-11-25 10:32:18 PM
"I've never heard of this before, so obviously it's fake."  As someone who has been dealing with chronic urticaria for months, fark most of you all. Just because you've never heard of it doesn't make it fake or "all in his head." I know, I know, welcome to Fark.

Some people have an allergic-like reactions to cold, sunlight, water, heat, or pressure. For me, what started as a few small itchy bumps turned into horribly itchy hives covering most of my body, and swollen eyes and hands. At its worst, I woke up in the middle of the night with my tongue so swollen I couldn't talk or swallow.

I also have MS, and I honestly prefer my MS to the hives. After months of testing and trying every combo of histamines, I am finally no longer breaking out constantly.

There is not a lot of research into chronic urticaria. A few rare causes that are known include autoimmune hypothyroidism and lupus. There could also be a problem with the body's ability to break down histamine. If you want to learn something about it, read this  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2492902/
 
2013-11-25 10:44:01 PM
My uncle (and I think possibly his son) has cold urticaria. It is a real allergy. This guy simply has it worse. My uncle was diagnosed with this several decades ago.

This is not psychosomatic.

As for the Daily Mail having a lot of these stories, it is a right wing paper in competition with British tabloids. British readers of the Daily Mail type love this kind of story. Some of their stories may be bogus, but a lot of these rare maladies are real enough. The Daily Mail readers just lap this stuff up:  somebody with worse problems than they have.
 
2013-11-25 10:59:50 PM

Sugarpuss O'Shea: Peki: Cool. I've gotta go in at some point and find out if I have PLE (polymorphous light eruptions) or solar urticaria. Only seems to happen under specific circumstances--something about car windows or windows in general?--but I get a similar flushing but far more extensive when I get emotional. I also get nauseated, but I'd attributed that to motion sickness as I can't read in cars without setting off the symptoms. Not sure if the flush comes first or if it's triggered by motion sickness. . .

/oh for want of good healthcare

Gastrointestinal problems like nausea can be common with allergic and non-allergic histamine reactions. Think about meds like Pepcid or Zantac - they are H2 (Histamine 2) blockers. Check out this report, there's a good chart that shows how symptoms that can be caused by excess histamine http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/85/5/1185.full.

I started getting hives in July, and was finally diagnosed with chronic idiopathic urticaria, primarily pressure and delayed-pressure urticaria. All the diagnosis got me was, "we don't really know what's causing it, we can only (somewhat) treat the symptoms." I'm finally not covered in hives every day, but I still break out from time to time. Not saying I wouldn't recommend you get checked out, but don't get your hopes up. Rarely, urticaria can be caused by more serious issues, to it's worth getting checked out if for not other reason than to rule those out.

This is a good overview of urticaria -  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2492902/


I have something like this. I sometimes break out in hives when I take my shirt off, particularly at night in the bathroom, most likely around 9:00 p.m.--less often before or after that time period.

I have dermatographism as well--I can write my name on my skin and it'll break out in welts. I think this is partly a genetic vulnerability (given my uncle's urticaria and other problems with allergies in the family). However, I probably partly caused the photosensitivity by exposing myself to natural oils such as lavender and to scented candles.

Perhaps some of my nausea when I take my vitamins in the morning and my tendancy to have more problems when I am upset are related. Anti-histamines do help with my skin and breathing problems and they aren't nearly as bad as when I went to see an allergist.

I can't remember all of my short list of proven allergies but I think planting trees exposed me to enough fir, spruce and pine to cause sensitivity to some of the scents and oils in these trees' needles, while wood fires and firewood might have started the process for both skin reactions and breathiing problems. I have some more common allegies such as dustmites (two species, one that live off of humans and one that live off of pets, I think). They seem to be easier to control with the usual methods of prevention.

Most allegies require a chemical trigger (a protein of some sort) but you can have the same sort of skin reactions and breathing problems due to a number of other things including heat, cold, light, pressure, humidity, etc. I assume the nervous system is somehow involved in these, which might explain why emotion can worsen problems that respond to antihistamines.
 
2013-11-25 11:22:32 PM
Is it just me or is England home to every stupid and vague disease known to man? Not to mention every tenth degree of stupidity from 0 to minus 3000
 
2013-11-26 12:06:07 AM
I believe this, because it's in the Daily Mail.
 
2013-11-26 12:06:26 AM

brantgoose: Most allegies require a chemical trigger (a protein of some sort) but you can have the same sort of skin reactions and breathing problems due to a number of other things including heat, cold, light, pressure, humidity, etc. I assume the nervous system is somehow involved in these, which might explain why emotion can worsen problems that respond to antihistamines.


See if I end up with allergies I'm partially farked, because if I take something like Benedryl it sets off an asthma attack. I'd like to get tested, because I'm sure there's stuff there, I'm just not sure what I could feasibly do to treat it besides avoidance (if possible). I'm not prone to allergies, but I do have contact dermatitis with things like nickel and a particular kind of medical tape and severe psoriasis. Would be interesting to get a test (though they are farking expensive).

The things that keeps popping out at me is the nausea. I'll have to pay a little more attention next time, too, and see if I can pick out the time line of what symptoms happen first. Motion sickness (I can't read in a car), nausea, the weird blotchy flushing on my skin that is way higher in temperature than the rest of my skin, and I end up pulling at the seat belt or my shirt to try to get it as far away from my neck as possible (a response to feeling like I'm being choked even though I'm not? but that's not my conscious thought, just "I feel sick and I don't want this near my neck"). Like I said, have to talk to a doc and probably get stuck with a needle a few times to find out for sure. . . I'd chalk it up to motion sickness alone, but you're supposed to go pale, not flush.
 
2013-11-26 02:16:26 AM
static2.businessinsider.com

Understands.
 
2013-11-26 07:07:30 AM
A man so sensitive to Daily FAIL links on Fark that if he reads one, he immediately chokes up and st
 
2013-11-26 07:55:24 AM

Khellendros: SpectroBoy: So a mentally ill person with a psychosomatic illness then.

Got it.

Psst.  Your ignorance is showing.  Might want to do something about that.


Pssst... psychosomatic illness is still real and can have real physical manifestations.
 
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