If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Dilbert)   Scott Adams hoped his father would die soon. Sadly, he got his wish but not before letting you know how he feels about death   (dilbert.com) divider line 99
    More: Sad, Adam Hope  
•       •       •

8333 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 24 Nov 2013 at 6:54 PM (34 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



99 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-11-24 04:57:50 PM
Thank God, neither of my parents is dying like this, but they ARE both entirely dependent on Medicare, Social Security, and sometimes Medicaid. Every time some right wing asshat who doesn't know a damn thing about healthcare opens their fat trap about Obamacare, this is pretty much exactly how I want to respond to them.

Good for you, Scott.

And my sincere condolences.
 
2013-11-24 04:59:33 PM
Right there with him.  We need to complete the sale on grandma's house this week or we can't pay for her care next month.  Her mind is gone, too.  It kills me to see her like this.
 
2013-11-24 05:01:08 PM
Good for Scott. The law that lets us end the suffering of a dog but not a human is unjust, inhuman, and violates the establishment clause by using the government to promote a religious idea that we must suffer because God wants us to suffer and our suffering is holy. fark that.

And if anyone hasn't seen it, Choosing to Die with Terry Pratchett does an amazing job discussing the implications of physician-assisted suicide.
 
2013-11-24 05:05:22 PM
Shouldn't he be wishing them a long painful death, not a short one?  A victim of their own lawmaking.
 
2013-11-24 05:14:04 PM

Diogenes: Right there with him.  We need to complete the sale on grandma's house this week or we can't pay for her care next month.  Her mind is gone, too.  It kills me to see her like this.


Damn, so sorry Diogenes.
 
2013-11-24 05:16:05 PM
AMEN!

(Miss you Pop and sorry you had to endure what you endured)
 
2013-11-24 05:24:14 PM
Yeah, I understand exactly what he's saying.

/and he's right
 
2013-11-24 05:25:25 PM
I don't agree with a lot of what scott adams has to say, but i feel for his loss and the pain he and his family has gone through because of puritan ideals of life and the choices humans are allowed to make.

he gets a pass on the frothing "fark all politicians that voted against euthanasia -- i want to watch you die" for the time being.  But this seems just like a of people's inability to empathize with others until the subject hits directly home.
 
2013-11-24 05:34:33 PM
I'm a patriotic guy by nature. I love my country. But the government? Well, we just broke up.

So he WANTS the Obamacare death panels?
/maybe he's right
 
2013-11-24 05:38:02 PM
Yes, Subby. That confused me. I saw all these posts offering condoleances and wondered how so many people could be misreading or not reading Scott Adams original post.

Well, my mistake!

And to think the thread was only getting started with its first troll!

Death is part of life and as such is a concern of all the living. It is inevitable that there will be a diversity of sentiment and opinion on it.

But is is the business of us all, so we all have rights and duties to make our own decisions.

It is therefore the perfect breeding ground for trolls, dogmaticists and bullies.

But health and death are too important to leave to doctors, lawyers, politicians, and clergy, just as war is too important to leave to the generals. They are human life, and they belong to the living.

I hope to live very long. I am able to deal with a fair amount of pain thanks to the miracle of moaning, whining, whinging, biatching and complaining.

I can even endure some considerable and continual pain without much moaning, and I do. Some of my family members are absolute geniuses at hiding their suffering. They must have the instincts of wild animals--never show a weakness for fear others will take advantage of it or persecute you for being sick and thus a risk of contagion. As my dentist said when he discovered he was underestimating the problems with one of my teeth, I'm a "tough guy" despite appearances (and noises) to the contrary.

All in all though, I worry more about the anti-euthanasia and anti-abortion people more than the pro- camp. They are more to be feared because they put their beliefs and principles before compassion and mercy.

It takes a long time for people to reach the moral level of a Buddha, a Jesus, or a Socrates. Most people don't. These people are a six on a six-point scale of altruism and empathy. Most religionists and moralists are at best a four.

I'd sooner be an atheist than a Believer because of this, even if I knew for a fact there was a God or Providence. Nothing personal, God. I just don't like your followers. Same to you, Jesus, Moses, Buddha, Marx, Freud, Smith etc. You're all very fine in your way, but some of those who call upon your name do so in vanity if not in vain.
 
2013-11-24 05:47:25 PM
These laws exist because others feel they must protects us as judged against their morals = religious meddling.


Don't get me started how they'll fund this endlessly but not some poor person who needs health care.
 
2013-11-24 05:49:45 PM
Yeah...I remember helping my mom change my grandma's diapers.  She was diagnosed with a brain tumor and expected to live 6 more months...she lived for another 18 long, long months.  We all got to watch her slowly lose the ability to recognize her family or show any glimmer of emotion.  The day she died was a great relief for all..

You have my condolences, Scott
 
2013-11-24 06:09:22 PM
Well at least single payer is on the way after this carefully orchestrated "fiasco" so Scott will get his wish and the government will be able to put people down. Sorry his dad had to endure.
 
2013-11-24 06:13:04 PM
Sorry for your loss, Scott.  And happy for you he is dead now.

I feel the same way.  My dad died of liver cancer 13 years ago and I cannot describe to people what his last days were like because people would think I was a downer for just bringing it up.  I'd say he died in my arms but I actually had to stop hugging him as the pain brought him back to life.  I wanted him to die as calmly as possible.

My pets died with more dignity and greater comfort than my dad.
 
2013-11-24 06:16:32 PM

edmo: These laws exist because others feel they must protects us as judged against their morals = religious meddling.


Don't get me started how they'll fund this endlessly but not some poor person who needs health care.


Join the Church of Namatad
1) all drugs are sacraments
2) we have bingo, craps and blackjack everyday - another sacrment
3) our priestess are all holy whores, donations are optional, wink wink wink
4) steak and bacon are our two true gods, which we are required to pray to daily, by eating them
5) euthanasia is required in order to get to Steak and Bacon heaven.
6) something something about smiting non-believers
 
2013-11-24 06:22:11 PM
I'm a physician, and it sux'ed watching my father go from a highly-functioning 65-yo to a diaper-wearing infant over a 5-year span because of Parkinson's disease with dementia. I understand and empathize with all the sentiments expressed by Scott Adams. When my father got urinary sepsis at home just days after being discharged from the ICU for the 2nd time, we opted for home hospice.

Elder-care and end-of-life choices are modern curses when compared to the accepted and expected normal life-cycle before the late-20th century.
 
2013-11-24 06:32:00 PM
Sadly, the folks he most wants to reach, and who most need to be reached, won't be, because for them, it's a crusade that has nothing to do with life or people, it has to do with votes and money. It's about putting themselves in power, in putting themselves between folks and doing much of anything. They want the gub'ment out of their lives, but for damn sure in the lives of others. It's not about the sanctity of life, because they don't want a life that is sacred, but a life that serves a purpose, and that purpose is to be a symbol.

These are folks who want children who suffer. Who want children born into poverty, and unable to escape it. They want folks to grow up, and keep quiet. They want to armor themselves against they tyranny of the majority, they want to armor themselves against other folks' beliefs, they want to armor themselves against anyone assailing the walls of comfort that they build for themselves, and damned if they aren't good at getting folks to vote against their own interests, and call it "freedom." They want people who shut up, do what they're told, pay, and pay for the rest of their lives, and who won't question it. These are folks who wish the the Heavens that they could just give most of the populace a lobotomy and keep them quiet, and continue dumping cash into their laps, and they don't care about the quality of life, they don't care about the conditions, just keep paying for the quality of life for them, and theirs, and the less educated, the less informed, the less invested in the system, the better. These are folks who like to talk about how much they care, and all they care about is the power that comes from the position. They want the authority over telling others how to live their lives, and to be insulated from anything that might impact their own comfort and position. They want to be known for their moral superiority, and they want, more than anything, to undercut anything that might refute their claims. The media has to be gutted for that. Other faiths have to be gutted for that. The economy has to be gutted for that. These aren't folks to be reasoned with--because reason doesn't come into it. Power is the only thing that they understand, and that's why they are wield power to prevent others from challenging theirs. Any weapon is justified. Any argument is justified. Any lie is justified. Anything is open, because theirs is a just crusade, a crusade to KEEP them with power, and thus anything that they do in their quest is moral. It is just. Just to keep the yoke over others, because others might choose to do things differently, live lives that aren't in service to them and their needs.

Myopic? Selfish? These are folks who never progressed in their emotional development enough to discern that anyone else matters. Even their own loved ones, serve just their own interests, and are just toys to play with, and discard when convenient.

I can't say I applaud Adams' statement, but I understand the frustration, I understand the rage, I understand the need to be said, but the folks who most NEED to get the message, won't listen, because it has nothing to do with them, and is just words on phosphor that distract, and thus focus attention away from them, and thus, is of no real interest, save as possible ammunition for later, when they need another justification to preserve their hold on other people. And yes, I have nothing but contempt for these folks, nothing but a shared rage at their antics, and a rage that so many will leap to their defense, and that we continue to hand power to megalomaniacs who care nothing for their fellow humans, and that we don't toss them from our politics entirely. That others will leap to their defense, will leap through the hoops of their tortured logic to justify their pathological need to control the lives of others, and call that "freedom!" is a travesty beyond measure. Getting amoral asshats out of our politics is necessary if we want to do much of anything, but in this polarized society, if someone is 'fer something, then someone has to be ag'in it, and we give far too much power to those who leap to take those reins for themselves...
 
2013-11-24 06:38:33 PM
Is he talking about hospice care? Because that is some painful sh*t to go through for everyone involved.
 
2013-11-24 06:41:31 PM

NewportBarGuy: Is he talking about hospice care? Because that is some painful sh*t to go through for everyone involved.


PLUS, pretty sure that scott is rich enough to have moved his dad home to let him die at home and not somewhere which would keep him alive at all costs.
 
2013-11-24 06:58:38 PM
I went through this several years ago - my Gran was ready to go, and suffering the terrifying effects of Alzheimer's. And yet, the government told me we had to keep paying "the home" outrageous amounts of money for substandard care, and we couldn't help end her suffering, because, basically, the Catholics wouldn't like it.

Fark y'all. Fark ALL y'all.
 
2013-11-24 07:03:27 PM

keithgabryelski: I don't agree with a lot of what scott adams has to say, but i feel for his loss and the pain he and his family has gone through because of puritan ideals of life and the choices humans are allowed to make.

he gets a pass on the frothing "fark all politicians that voted against euthanasia -- i want to watch you die" for the time being.  But this seems just like a of people's inability to empathize with others until the subject hits directly home.


That describes him to a t.  But, I can understand his rage right now.
 
2013-11-24 07:06:34 PM
Has he ever apologized for the Dilbert Cartoon yet?
 
2013-11-24 07:08:26 PM
I agree with him about doctor-assisted suicide being legal, but did he ever take a second to consider what his father wanted?

Sorry for your loss and all, but you still come across as a selfish douchebag.
 
2013-11-24 07:11:15 PM
Story makes me glad I live in a state where physician-assisted suicide is legal.
 
2013-11-24 07:12:10 PM

The My Little Pony Killer: I agree with him about doctor-assisted suicide being legal, but did he ever take a second to consider what his father wanted?

Sorry for your loss and all, but you still come across as a selfish douchebag.


That he is.  My favorite of his stories.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-17852_3-20054542-71.html

He uses alts to defend himself on the Intertubes. He may be a Total Farker.
 
2013-11-24 07:12:13 PM

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: Good for Scott. The law that lets us end the suffering of a dog but not a human is unjust, inhuman, and violates the establishment clause by using the government to promote a religious idea that we must suffer because God wants us to suffer and our suffering is holy. fark that.

And if anyone hasn't seen it, Choosing to Die with Terry Pratchett does an amazing job discussing the implications of physician-assisted suicide.


It's worse than that. If I treated my dog the way the hospitals treated my terminal grandfather, there'd be animal cruelty charges, and rightly so.
 
2013-11-24 07:20:59 PM

The My Little Pony Killer: I agree with him about doctor-assisted suicide being legal, but did he ever take a second to consider what his father wanted?

Sorry for your loss and all, but you still come across as a selfish douchebag.


If his father was in a state of advanced dementia, I doubt his father would have known whether he was alive or dead most of the time anyway, and probably wished he was dead in those few lucid moments.
 
2013-11-24 07:25:08 PM

The My Little Pony Killer: I agree with him about doctor-assisted suicide being legal, but did he ever take a second to consider what his father wanted?

Sorry for your loss and all, but you still come across as a selfish douchebag.


At the point where his father is incoherent and will never, ever return it is irrelevant what his father wanted.  His father was dead in all but body.
 
2013-11-24 07:25:25 PM

fusillade762: Story makes me glad I live in a state where physician-assisted suicide is legal.


Same here.

/ should update my Living Will, I have 'Fundie relatives that might try to keep me alive...even though they aren't closely related....
// my immediate family would be OK with this.
 
2013-11-24 07:31:30 PM
My dad died in May of this year at 87, and was COPD. He was basically tripping for the last 2-3 weeks due to low oxygenation in his blood. He wanted to die, but had no viable means to end it sooner, so he basically starved himself.

Anyone who isn't fully behind "death with dignity" can fark right off. No one should have to be put through suffering because of your f'd up religions beliefs.
 
2013-11-24 07:32:56 PM

The My Little Pony Killer: I agree with him about doctor-assisted suicide being legal, but did he ever take a second to consider what his father wanted?

Sorry for your loss and all, but you still come across as a selfish douchebag.


This is why my daughter and the girl critter know exactly how I feel about this sort of thing.

When I had my little "accident" that blew out my aorta like a bad seal, my girlfriend was there right beside me. She was instrumental in me holding on, and fighting on. I got better, but for a while, it was dicey. Especially before I realized that I was on a spinal block. For what seemed an eternity, I couldn't move, I was being breathed for by a machine, and the only way I could communicate was with the barest of squeezes from my hands, and it was terrifying. Terrifying to think that it was going to be that way for the rest of my days. I got better. I recovered, and I understand the implications that just because someone is in bad shape one week, that it isn't a guarantee that will be the case forever. It's important to discuss these matters BEFORE things get dicey. So that your loved ones can make informed choices, to carry out your wishes, before you're in a position where you can't communicate them. Living wills, and your loved ones knowing your care options and your feeling upon those options, is important.

I don't go down easy. I've been written off far too many times, and gotten back up and walked away from way too many situations where I've been told that I can't expect to have any sort of life worth living. My own doctor told me after the aneurysm, that I'd be lucky to make 6 months. That was 15 years ago. I was told that I couldn't expect a year, then two, then five, then ten, and now my doctors sort of just let me do my thing, because I've beaten all their projections, and stomped them into the ground, and I started off doing exactly that by surviving an aortic dissection for 40 minutes BEFORE getting to the hospital, and most folks die, even with EMS, within the first 20. That was with a torn ascending aorta, and the valve attached being ripped nearly in two. Let's not even get into the accidents and other assorted calamities that I've had occur over the years, including getting stabbed at the club. I know the value of NOT simply accepting a diagnosis and lying down and shutting the Hells up. And my loved ones know that I'm not going to simply accept such a thing. But there comes a time, when I'm NOT in there, when the anima has checked out, and the meat doesn't quite figure out to shut off the lights after I leave, they are likewise aware of how I want them to deal with things.

I think the assessment of Adams being selfish is premature. It comes from a place of rage, and loss, and grief, and the anger in his statement is entirely natural. That rage is not just the rage of loss of a parent, but the loss of a parent in pain and suffering mightily. I give him a pass on that, because there's a lot going on behind the scenes on this tiny page.
 
2013-11-24 07:38:39 PM
My stepfather died, left no provision for his diabetic, disabled son, Chuck. I moved Chuck in with me. For a year I tried to comfort him as Diabetes ate his body up. Emaciated, sores, loss of bladder, bowel control. etc. He was a completely broken, depressed 44 year old man. In and out of hospitals, wouldn't accept going into a nursing home, afraid he'd be abandoned. At least there I hoped they could get his blood sugar under control and he'd begin to heal, but he wanted nothing to do with it. He was devastated that the house was lost, along with all the car stuff, RC model stuff of his in it, except for the stuff we put in storage for him.  I started telling people I wanted him to get better, or die. It was pure misery seeing him just laying in his bedroom, steadily and slowly getting worse. I felt so helpless.

Finally, when he started convulsing, rushed him to the hospital, where they discovered his heart valves were infected, covered with bacteria, "Vegetation" they called it. The doctors said he was too weak to operate on, so they wouldn't. All we could do was move him to the hospice wing, where they stopped giving him the drugs that kept his heart going. He lasted two days. He had a miserable life, start to finish. Born with a heart defect, afflicted with ADD and god knows what else. Never really got to do anything with his life. He was a classic fetal alcohol syndrome kid, because of my mother's drinking and partying after she divorced my father. Chuck was my mother's creation, and the whole family suffered his whole life because of his out of control behavior. Constantly in trouble at school, constantly having to save him from bullies in school that he pissed off. We couldn't bring friends home, had to keep stuff locked up because he'd swipe everything, wreck stuff, etc.

The whole thing was just so heartbreaking. Toward the end I would have welcomed a merciful end for him. At the end the doctors provided that by just withholding treatment. I wanted so much to fix him, save him, but I have to say it was a relief to see his suffering end. The whole thing aged me.
 
2013-11-24 07:48:48 PM
2.bp.blogspot.com
What does he have against the youth in asia?
 
2013-11-24 07:49:14 PM
Hubie- I hear you loud and clear.

Took care of my mom for 5 years as she slowly declined due to ALS with dementia. She lasted another 4 years in nursing care.

Many times I wished she would recover; can't count the times I prayed with tears for her to pass quietly. She did neither.

Now I find her malady is genetic. I hope my family has the opportunity to find a blessing in my decline, as I did with mom. But it's doubtful.

Plus, her care nearly bankrupted us and we are still trying to recover after 10 years. Yet I would not now trade a day of the time I got to care for her for the entire amount of what we paid for her nursing care.

I guess it comes down to mitigating suffering and trying to find the "silver lining." Best wishes to you for that.
 
2013-11-24 07:57:40 PM
Surprised no one has mentioned Living Will.

Both my parents had them, they made the decision to not have any extra-ordinary measures taken to extend their lives.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-11-24 07:58:22 PM
My grandparents died at home after months of hospice care. Nursing homes just didn't work out and a hospital woudn't have helped, not even prolonged life as much as it prologed Scott Adams' father's. They didn't ask for extraordinary measures. She had dementia but was able to understand that her husband died. She died a week later.

My understanding is he had health care as part of his retirement plan, as well as enough assets to pay for whatever he wanted. He worked about 40 years for a big company in the era when a lifetime with a company meant they would take care of you. So the home vs. nursing home vs. hospital decision was not all about money.

Those hospice nurses were good people, and we're going to need a lot more like them as the population ages.
 
2013-11-24 08:04:45 PM

hubiestubert: Sadly, the folks he most wants to reach, and who most need to be reached, won't be, because for them, it's a crusade that has nothing to do with life or people, it has to do with votes and money. It's about putting themselves in power, in putting themselves between folks and doing much of anything. They want the gub'ment out of their lives, but for damn sure in the lives of others. It's not about the sanctity of life, because they don't want a life that is sacred, but a life that serves a purpose, and that purpose is to be a symbol.

These are folks who want children who suffer. Who want children born into poverty, and unable to escape it. They want folks to grow up, and keep quiet. They want to armor themselves against they tyranny of the majority, they want to armor themselves against other folks' beliefs, they want to armor themselves against anyone assailing the walls of comfort that they build for themselves, and damned if they aren't good at getting folks to vote against their own interests, and call it "freedom." They want people who shut up, do what they're told, pay, and pay for the rest of their lives, and who won't question it. These are folks who wish the the Heavens that they could just give most of the populace a lobotomy and keep them quiet, and continue dumping cash into their laps, and they don't care about the quality of life, they don't care about the conditions, just keep paying for the quality of life for them, and theirs, and the less educated, the less informed, the less invested in the system, the better. These are folks who like to talk about how much they care, and all they care about is the power that comes from the position. They want the authority over telling others how to live their lives, and to be insulated from anything that might impact their own comfort and position. They want to be known for their moral superiority, and they want, more than anything, to undercut anything that might refute their claims. The media has to be gutted ...


Dude, watch out for guys carrying swords, you may have undergone the goddamn quickening.
 
2013-11-24 08:05:08 PM
Has he created an alt to spam his own comments section yet?
 
2013-11-24 08:06:53 PM
Mom had Alzheimer's - while I cannot agree with him  I understand what Scott is going through; we lost Mom day-by-day, a little bit at a time.  I didn't wish Mom would die but I was certainly relieved when she passed; she was out of her confused pain and misery.

Alzheimer's will test your spirit, your adaptability, your sanity, your love for the victim.  I hope I passed the test, Mom
 
2013-11-24 08:25:56 PM
He could have checked his father out of whatever facility he was in and taken him home on hospice, maybe over medicate him a little with the morphine.
 
2013-11-24 08:35:04 PM

hubiestubert: The My Little Pony Killer: I agree with him about doctor-assisted suicide being legal, but did he ever take a second to consider what his father wanted?

Sorry for your loss and all, but you still come across as a selfish douchebag.

This is why my daughter and the girl critter know exactly how I feel about this sort of thing.

When I had my little "accident" that blew out my aorta like a bad seal, my girlfriend was there right beside me. She was instrumental in me holding on, and fighting on. I got better, but for a while, it was dicey. Especially before I realized that I was on a spinal block. For what seemed an eternity, I couldn't move, I was being breathed for by a machine, and the only way I could communicate was with the barest of squeezes from my hands, and it was terrifying. Terrifying to think that it was going to be that way for the rest of my days. I got better. I recovered, and I understand the implications that just because someone is in bad shape one week, that it isn't a guarantee that will be the case forever. It's important to discuss these matters BEFORE things get dicey. So that your loved ones can make informed choices, to carry out your wishes, before you're in a position where you can't communicate them. Living wills, and your loved ones knowing your care options and your feeling upon those options, is important.

I don't go down easy. I've been written off far too many times, and gotten back up and walked away from way too many situations where I've been told that I can't expect to have any sort of life worth living. My own doctor told me after the aneurysm, that I'd be lucky to make 6 months. That was 15 years ago. I was told that I couldn't expect a year, then two, then five, then ten, and now my doctors sort of just let me do my thing, because I've beaten all their projections, and stomped them into the ground, and I started off doing exactly that by surviving an aortic dissection for 40 minutes BEFORE getting to the hospital, and most folks die, even with EMS, within the first 20. That was with a torn ascending aorta, and the valve attached being ripped nearly in two. Let's not even get into the accidents and other assorted calamities that I've had occur over the years, including getting stabbed at the club. I know the value of NOT simply accepting a diagnosis and lying down and shutting the Hells up. And my loved ones know that I'm not going to simply accept such a thing. But there comes a time, when I'm NOT in there, when the anima has checked out, and the meat doesn't quite figure out to shut off the lights after I leave, they are likewise aware of how I want them to deal with things.

I think the assessment of Adams being selfish is premature. It comes from a place of rage, and loss, and grief, and the anger in his statement is entirely natural. That rage is not just the rage of loss of a parent, but the loss of a parent in pain and suffering mightily. I give him a pass on that, because there's a lot going on behind the scenes on this tiny page.


You need to read up on dementia and Alzheimer's. There is no walking it off. My grandfather died from complications from Alzheimer's. It took 2 years of continuing loss of awareness/memory/functions - I can't explain how much I fear that kind of death. I'll literally kill myself before I go out like that.
 
2013-11-24 08:39:45 PM
I tend to find people against euthanasia neither have been nor are present when other people are dying.  Which is not at all surprising to me, all things considered.
 
2013-11-24 08:47:17 PM
As someone with severe chronic pain that is going to get worse, and the associated mobility issues that are going with it, I would like to politely say the same as Scott Adams. I want to make my own damn choices. I have a living will and power of attorney vested with my loved ones who will respect it. I am also careful to make sure I have options - I just hope I am able to use them. Quite honestly, the decision to choose to die when I choose has been very liberating, and has made me determined to live as richly and as fully as I can as long as I can (have quality). Not the opposite. Unlike those pious sanctimonious freaks who cry about the bliss of heaven and then would deny people the right to enter when they need to. Bet they don't let their pets suffer. I cannot loather them more, or excoriate them sufficiently. Mind your own beeswax, freaks.
 
2013-11-24 08:49:36 PM

neilbradley: My dad died in May of this year at 87, and was COPD. He was basically tripping for the last 2-3 weeks due to low oxygenation in his blood. He wanted to die, but had no viable means to end it sooner, so he basically starved himself.

Anyone who isn't fully behind "death with dignity" can fark right off. No one should have to be put through suffering because of your f'd up religions beliefs.


THIS THIS AND MORE THIS

My mom starved to death at home - AKA - died at home.
Just keep giving her more pain meds and she stroked out over and over.
Stupid catholics. You could have given her a LOT of her pain and spared her from starving to death as a zombie. But no .....
 
2013-11-24 08:54:36 PM
youmightberight:  You need to read up on dementia and Alzheimer's. There is no walking it off. My grandfather died from complications from Alzheimer's. It took 2 years of continuing loss of awareness/memory/functions - I can't explain how much I fear that kind of death. I'll literally kill myself before I go out like that.

I lost my Grandmother to Alzheimer's a long while before her body checked out. I more than realize the issues, which is why talking with family BEFORE is a good idea. My own struggle just for the short while while trying to regain motor function post surgery more than illustrated that very real fear. I was only down for a week, and it seemed like months--time sense in that framework is an issue--and that time was literally the most frightened I've ever been. I still wake up in cold sweats today, remembering that helplessness and confusion. That was 15 years ago, and I've been stabbed, I've been in accidents, I've been snake bit since then, and none of those things come close to putting me in the blind fear that I wake up to from the nightmares remembering coming to in the hospital.

I used my experience, because not ALL issues where decisions have to be made for someone occur at the end of a long life. I understand the degeneration, the dissolution that occurs with that kind illness, and likewise, I understand that sometimes folks DO bounce back from strokes, from other kinds of illness. There has to be balance, and that requires more than just a knee jerk response, and that is why you need to discuss matters with your loved ones, so that they know, so that they have time to prepare, and so that they know how you feel in what circumstances, and what prognosis will come under your wishes.
 
2013-11-24 08:56:38 PM

timelady: As someone with severe chronic pain that is going to get worse, and the associated mobility issues that are going with it, I would like to politely say the same as Scott Adams. I want to make my own damn choices. I have a living will and power of attorney vested with my loved ones who will respect it. I am also careful to make sure I have options - I just hope I am able to use them. Quite honestly, the decision to choose to die when I choose has been very liberating, and has made me determined to live as richly and as fully as I can as long as I can (have quality). Not the opposite. Unlike those pious sanctimonious freaks who cry about the bliss of heaven and then would deny people the right to enter when they need to. Bet they don't let their pets suffer. I cannot loather them more, or excoriate them sufficiently. Mind your own beeswax, freaks.


THIS
and pain and suffering on everyone who would deny you this right
 
2013-11-24 09:22:35 PM
Wow. I understand the need for suicide in certain circumstances, and would never vote against it, but who knew Adams was such a douche?
 
2013-11-24 09:35:54 PM
I support the idea of people being allowed to make their own choices about how and when they want to die. We simply don't have anything even remotely close to the medical technology we'd need to truly help older people.

timelady: As someone with severe chronic pain that is going to get worse, and the associated mobility issues that are going with it,


Sorry to hear that, is it indiscreet to ask what is going on there? So if it isn't, what is going on there?
 
2013-11-24 09:48:01 PM
I'm surprised so many of you believe the case against assisted suicide lies strictly on religious grounds. I would be wary of unscrupulous individuals demanding euthanasia for personal gain.
 
2013-11-24 09:48:06 PM
Having watched my father die a slow, painful death, I am 100% in agreement with Mr. Adams.
 
Displayed 50 of 99 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report