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(11 Alive)   Scientists close in on finding most far-out galaxies, man   (11alive.com) divider line 40
    More: Interesting, galaxies, University of Texas-Austin, star clusters, scientists, Wide Field Camera 3, James Webb Space Telescope, netting, redshifts  
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4096 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 Nov 2013 at 7:41 PM (40 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



40 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-11-23 07:43:26 PM
Groovy
 
2013-11-23 07:43:45 PM
They're all pretty high and far out.
 
2013-11-23 07:44:40 PM
Sandra Bullock dies at the end of "Gravity."

There. I just saved you $10 and two hours. Now go see "Free Birds" and enjoy a real movie.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-11-23 07:50:56 PM
Why do we call it infrared and not ultrared? It's like, how much more red can this be? And the answer is, ultrared.
 
2013-11-23 07:53:35 PM

ZAZ: Why do we call it infrared and not ultrared? It's like, how much more red can this be? And the answer is, ultrared.


Uktra-red is the new orange. ..
 
2013-11-23 07:55:15 PM

SpdrJay: ZAZ: Why do we call it infrared and not ultrared? It's like, how much more red can this be? And the answer is, ultrared.

Uktra-red is the new orange. ..


Octarine is the new Uktra-red.
 
2013-11-23 07:55:21 PM

nickdaisy: Sandra Bullock dies at the end of "Gravity."

There. I just saved you $10 and two hours. Now go see "Free Birds" and enjoy a real movie.


Congrats on being an ass.
 
2013-11-23 08:02:59 PM
Hopefully scientists get their money's worth out of the James Webb Telescope since it's sucking up a huge chunk of NASA's science budget.
 
2013-11-23 08:05:04 PM

JasonOfOrillia: SpdrJay: ZAZ: Why do we call it infrared and not ultrared? It's like, how much more red can this be? And the answer is, ultrared.

Uktra-red is the new orange. ..

Octarine is the new Uktra-red.


www.zeldauniverse.net

Is that like the Octarine Of Time?
 
2013-11-23 08:06:21 PM
If it goes on forever how can they find the last 1 ?
 
2013-11-23 08:08:07 PM
Thinking about it now-- I regret my earlier post

I'm sorry
 
2013-11-23 08:15:26 PM

ZAZ: Why do we call it infrared and not ultrared? It's like, how much more red can this be? And the answer is, ultrared.


Ultraviolet - shorter wavelength (higher frequency) than violet.
Infrared - longer wavelength (lower frequency) than red.

Sort of like ultrasound is too high to hear and infrasonics are too low to hear (but you can feel it).
 
2013-11-23 08:16:50 PM

Danger Avoid Death: JasonOfOrillia: SpdrJay: ZAZ: Why do we call it infrared and not ultrared? It's like, how much more red can this be? And the answer is, ultrared.

Uktra-red is the new orange. ..

Octarine is the new Uktra-red.

[www.zeldauniverse.net image 400x280]

Is that like the Octarine Of Time?


Nah, it's like the eighth colour from the spectrum of Discworld.
 
2013-11-23 08:21:55 PM

nickdaisy: Thinking about it now-- I regret my earlier post

I'm sorry


Damage? Done.

You? On record in favor of Free Birds.
 
2013-11-23 08:35:02 PM
So the universe is supposedly 13.7 billion years old, based on what we can see.  What we see is what happened 13.7 billion years ago.  What happens there today we won't see for another 13.7 billion years. But if space is expanding then we won't see it for 27 billion years, and if the rate of expansion is accelerating then we really won't see it for 50 billion years.
So what we see today is really 50 billion light years away, meaning what happens there today we won't see for 100 billion years. Or something.
 
2013-11-23 08:55:12 PM

nickdaisy: Sandra Bullock dies at the end of "Gravity."

There. I just saved you $10 and two hours. Now go see "Free Birds" and enjoy a real movie.


Really, dude? I was finally going to take my wife to see this tomorrow and I come across this post I'd expect to see from an antisocial nitwit on /b/
I didn't expect a cinematic masterpiece, but I was still looking forward to it. That was a pretty shiatty thing to do.
 
2013-11-23 08:57:22 PM

nickdaisy: Sandra Bullock dies at the end of "Gravity."

There. I just saved you $10 and two hours. Now go see "Free Birds" and enjoy a real movie.


You are a bad person, and you should feel very bad.
 
2013-11-23 09:04:48 PM

Plissken: nickdaisy: Sandra Bullock dies at the end of "Gravity."

There. I just saved you $10 and two hours. Now go see "Free Birds" and enjoy a real movie.

Really, dude? I was finally going to take my wife to see this tomorrow and I come across this post I'd expect to see from an antisocial nitwit on /b/
I didn't expect a cinematic masterpiece, but I was still looking forward to it. That was a pretty shiatty thing to do.


Obviously he's trolling because at the end of the movie she kills Dumbledore.
 
2013-11-23 09:14:00 PM

Plissken: nickdaisy: Sandra Bullock dies at the end of "Gravity."

There. I just saved you $10 and two hours. Now go see "Free Birds" and enjoy a real movie.

Really, dude? I was finally going to take my wife to see this tomorrow and I come across this post I'd expect to see from an antisocial nitwit on /b/
I didn't expect a cinematic masterpiece, but I was still looking forward to it. That was a pretty shiatty thing to do.


Snape kills Sandra Bullock?
 
2013-11-23 09:29:02 PM
People whining about trolls on fark? Is there a new  influx of users?
 
2013-11-23 09:30:02 PM
There are always distant specs of galaxies farther away in the photos.
 
2013-11-23 09:40:16 PM

mikalmd: If it goes on forever how can they find the last 1 ?


You mean the first one?  The bigger debate is going to be what defines a galaxy once the bones are picked clean.  Does a giant spinning cloud of dust with just one star qualify as a galaxy?
 
2013-11-23 09:58:33 PM

Hazard91AWD: People whining about trolls on fark? Is there a new  influx of users?


Why we need immigration reform.
 
2013-11-23 10:06:50 PM
Under Relativistic time frames that Einstein set forth, 13.7 Billion is the starting point time of the Universe, and somehow we have been able to "see", everything back to a few fractions of a second after the "Big Bang" occured.
Now if dark matter exists, the dark matter is what is allowing us to see back so far, through Gravitic Lensing, and these effects are allowing us to see past the Inflation phase of the Universe back to the moments of creation.

However there are still a few, literally 3, scientists that are trying to use Machian Relativity, yes that Mach, that calculated the speed of sound. Using their calculations the Universe is closer to 17.5 to 18.2 Billion years old, and doesn't need dark matter to square the calculations, because everthing moves exclusively relative to each other (instead of through "special" relativity").

However, regardless of which system is actually correct, we are only able to see a sphere 13.7 (or 18.2) Billion years of the Universe, which is probably only about 1/81 of the actual total universe that is out there, and which we will probably never ever see, even if we were to get access to relativistic travel speeds. To make matters worse there are extrademensional 'branes and then possibly other entire universe(s), that again we'll never experience, but still may have an impact on ours (gravitational force, and if another universe starts to expand to impede or encompass ours).

Of course to trip out even more, if there is 85% of the Universe that is unseen, scientists are now suggesting the possibility of complex dark matter, and even suggesting "dark life" as a possible outcome of a diversity of dark matter. Sort of like in "Andromeda" (Yes a terrible TV Soap/Space/Buffy/Xena/Hercules/ Opera mashup) when the idea of "negative" or "dark" elements was introduced as a concept.

So there is a lot of "Far Out" ideas being explored. With something like 44% of the universe being dark energy, they are now trying to equate that to the theorhetically smallest unit of space/time the Planck time which is 5.39121 × 10−44 seconds or Planck length is 1.616252×10−35 meters as the energy that holds the universe together.
 
2013-11-23 11:02:22 PM
Hazard91AWD

People whining about trolls on fark? Is there a new influx of users?

September was a couple of months ago, but with all that net lag and expanding universe stuff ...

// Look between "new" and "influx" and you can actually see it.
 
2013-11-23 11:05:38 PM
i14.photobucket.com
 
2013-11-23 11:13:06 PM
....
Acravius:
However there are still a few, literally 3, scientists that are trying to use Machian Relativity, yes that Mach, that calculated the speed of sound. Using their calculations the Universe is closer to 17.5 to 18.2 Billion years old, and doesn't need dark matter to square the calculations, because everthing moves exclusively relative to each other (instead of through "special" relativity").
....

There is other evidence of dark matter, including one that even I can understand: gravitational lensing.  The light from very distant galaxies can be bent by intervening matter, or galaxies, resulting in a warped image of a galaxy, like you would see through a rippled piece of glass.  The cool thing is you can do a sort of reverse ray-trace on that image to map the density distribution of the massive material.  This yields a plot of clearly discernable galaxies, plus big blobs of other matter.
 
2013-11-23 11:32:30 PM
Do they have health care?
 
2013-11-23 11:40:57 PM
home.earthlink.net
 
2013-11-24 12:05:42 AM

nickdaisy: Thinking about it now-- I regret my earlier post

I'm sorry


Welcome to a multitude of ignore lists, farktard.
 
2013-11-24 02:14:58 AM
Hubble limit
 
2013-11-24 02:17:39 AM

nickdaisy: Sandra Bullock dies at the end of "Gravity."

There. I just saved you $10 and two hours. Now go see "Free Birds" and enjoy a real movie.


i.imgur.com
 
2013-11-24 12:08:16 PM

Hazard91AWD: People whining about trolls on fark? Is there a new  influx of users?


Half of the old trolls with Alts trying to keep the coals stoked.
 
2013-11-24 12:57:02 PM

ZAZ: Why do we call it infrared and not ultrared? It's like, how much more red can this be? And the answer is, ultrared.


Yes, but this one's redshift goes to 11.
 
2013-11-24 10:06:46 PM

nickdaisy: Sandra Bullock dies at the end of "Gravity."

There. I just saved you $10 and two hours. Now go see "Free Birds" and enjoy a real movie.


You assh*le.

Congrats on being the first dude I've put on "ignore" outside the politics tab.
 
2013-11-24 10:24:57 PM
for now...
 
2013-11-24 10:29:05 PM

nickdaisy: Sandra Bullock dies at the end of "Gravity."

There. I just saved you $10 and two hours. Now go see "Free Birds" and enjoy a real movie.


...pants on fire
 
2013-11-24 11:12:04 PM

El Morro: nickdaisy: Sandra Bullock dies at the end of "Gravity."

There. I just saved you $10 and two hours. Now go see "Free Birds" and enjoy a real movie.

You assh*le.

Congrats on being the first dude I've put on "ignore" outside the politics tab.


It's only a movie.
 
2013-11-24 11:13:08 PM

nickdaisy: Sandra Bullock dies at the end of "Gravity."

There. I just saved you $10 and two hours. Now go see "Free Birds" and enjoy a real movie.


Don't worry son, it's just a movie.
 
2013-11-25 04:59:06 AM
In an article about distant galaxies, why include a photo of a star cluster that's in our galaxy?

/confused.

www.11alive.com
 
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