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(NPR) Video On November 22nd, 1963, the director of the Boston Symphony broke the news to his musicians and the audience that the President had been assassinated. Here is the audio from that event, and the remarkable music which followed   (npr.org) divider line 107
    More: Video, Boston Symphony, Boston, executive directors, New York Philharmonic, Leonard Bernstein, President John F. Kennedy  
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7004 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Nov 2013 at 5:15 AM (42 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-11-22 12:05:13 AM
That is really hard to listen to. Wow.
 
2013-11-22 12:16:13 AM
That first gasp gave me chills, then sadness.

/Remember watching the TV coverage as a 2 year old
//Parents named me John after him
 
2013-11-22 12:25:46 AM
Absolutely chilling. I was but a young boy when Kennedy was shot and all I remember was how every adult I knew, men and women both, were incredibly sad. That funeral dirge summed it up perfectly. Great link, Subby.
 
2013-11-22 12:33:49 AM
I heard this on NPR earlier today. Sent shivers down my spine.
 
2013-11-22 12:35:03 AM
I remember distinctly looking at the clock, and I realize now it must have been 5 minutes slow; it read 10:55

/and then time stood still for a while
 
2013-11-22 12:48:31 AM
The day American innocence died
 
2013-11-22 01:21:00 AM
Third grade.  Mrs. Pendergras walked into the room and whispered in Mrs. Crandall's ear.  Mrs. Crandall told us all to go home.  At home, Mom was crying in front of the television.  The whole thing was surreal.
 
2013-11-22 01:39:49 AM

MorrisBird: Third grade.  Mrs. Pendergras walked into the room and whispered in Mrs. Crandall's ear.  Mrs. Crandall told us all to go home.  At home, Mom was crying in front of the television.  The whole thing was surreal.


Yeah? I was in third grade, too

/*respectfistbump*
 
2013-11-22 02:08:54 AM
img.fark.net
That concert might have gone a whole different direction had Fiedler been conducting at the time.
 
2013-11-22 03:40:43 AM

bearded clamorer: /Remember watching the TV coverage as a 2 year old
//Parents named me John after him


what was you name before he died?
 
2013-11-22 04:23:48 AM

log_jammin: bearded clamorer: /Remember watching the TV coverage as a 2 year old
//Parents named me John after him

what was you name before he died?


honestly, if you can find something to joke about in this story go for it... if not, pack it up and go home.  as much as 9/11 has been exploited, when you ask people where they were, what they remember from things like jfk getting shot, the planes at the tower, the challenger explosion,  anyone who does have a memory will get real serious, real quick.  and if you joke about it, you're the jackass.
 
2013-11-22 04:34:29 AM

cynicalminion: honestly, if you can find something to joke about in this story go for it... if not, pack it up and go home.  as much as 9/11 has been exploited, when you ask people where they were, what they remember from things like jfk getting shot, the planes at the tower, the challenger explosion,  anyone who does have a memory will get real serious, real quick.  and if you joke about it, you're the jackass.


i131.photobucket.com
 
2013-11-22 04:39:35 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: MorrisBird: Third grade.  Mrs. Pendergras walked into the room and whispered in Mrs. Crandall's ear.  Mrs. Crandall told us all to go home.  At home, Mom was crying in front of the television.  The whole thing was surreal.

Yeah? I was in third grade, too

/*respectfistbump*


It was a bizarre era in which to be raised.  People kept being shot, famous people.  Boys kept coming home in boxes.  We were actually told to "duck and cover" to avoid nuclear annihilation.  The National Guard started shooting kids.  Our childhoods were anything but innocent.  They were terrifying.  I watched Jack Ruby shoot Lee Harvey Oswald on live television with my daddy.  These are not normal things.
 
2013-11-22 04:43:01 AM

MorrisBird: These are not normal things.


but look at how normal you turned out!
 
2013-11-22 04:47:39 AM

log_jammin: cynicalminion: honestly, if you can find something to joke about in this story go for it... if not, pack it up and go home.  as much as 9/11 has been exploited, when you ask people where they were, what they remember from things like jfk getting shot, the planes at the tower, the challenger explosion,  anyone who does have a memory will get real serious, real quick.  and if you joke about it, you're the jackass.

[i131.photobucket.com image 510x363]


francis doesn't live here anymore.
 
2013-11-22 04:57:09 AM

log_jammin: MorrisBird: These are not normal things.

but look at how normal you turned out!


Exactly!
 
2013-11-22 04:58:04 AM
Abby Normal, or something.
 
2013-11-22 05:15:14 AM

MorrisBird: MaudlinMutantMollusk: MorrisBird: Third grade.  Mrs. Pendergras walked into the room and whispered in Mrs. Crandall's ear.  Mrs. Crandall told us all to go home.  At home, Mom was crying in front of the television.  The whole thing was surreal.

Yeah? I was in third grade, too

/*respectfistbump*

It was a bizarre era in which to be raised.  People kept being shot, famous people.  Boys kept coming home in boxes.  We were actually told to "duck and cover" to avoid nuclear annihilation.  The National Guard started shooting kids.  Our childhoods were anything but innocent.  They were terrifying.  I watched Jack Ruby shoot Lee Harvey Oswald on live television with my daddy.  These are not normal things.


Another third grader here. I was home sick that day and the television was on as the whole thing unfolded.

The sound quality is surprisingly good. I think this was also played at the Olympics ceremony held after the massacre in Munich.
 
2013-11-22 05:32:52 AM
I was not quite three years old and don't remember it, and I am not sure when I became aware of it.

But I do remember thinking in 1983 that it happened 20 years ago -- ancient history.
And now it happened 50 years ago -- just yesterday.

The assassination really put the zap on America's head.
 
2013-11-22 05:35:53 AM
I wasn't even born yet. Not even a gleam in my parents eyes. My older brother shiat his pants. Which was not unusual for a 3 month old kid.


Strange thing was that my mom told me that Kennedy was pretty much unpopular when he died.chances were that he was not going to get re-elected.

Then I see Tom Brokaw saying Kennedy was on the upswing.
 
2013-11-22 05:50:03 AM
I was living in Australia.  I was pretty much oblivious to the assasination itself, but I do remember my Dad had to spend extra hours at work, and my Mom had to make him a black armband.
 
2013-11-22 05:56:23 AM
Also in third grade, at Forest Lake Elementary School, and they had the radio turned on in the school office. They broadcast the radio over the PA system into the classrooms. We were stunned. It's the first time I ever saw an "Extra" edition of the daily paper. Until then, I thought that was just a joke thing they showed on cartoons. But there was an "Extra" edition of the Herald Tribune that day (I think it was the HT; can't remember for sure. Might have been another NY paper.)
 
2013-11-22 05:59:26 AM
This happened long before I was born, but my Dad talked about it every year when I was growing up. Kennedy was massively popular here before he died, mostly because he's been to visit Ireland just a few months before. The visit was a big deal and still fondly remembered here.
 
2013-11-22 05:59:33 AM
Before my time. My parents hadn't even met yet. My first real memory of an event of similar stature was the Challenger disaster (was in high school at the time). Well, that and the Buffalo Bills disaster of the early 90's.

/so sorry
 
2013-11-22 06:11:59 AM
This has been interesting and all, but doesn't it seem odd to make such a big deal on the 48th anniversary?

/I know a Kennedy is working in politics.
//That means it's after 1935
 
2013-11-22 06:21:28 AM

SauronWasFramed: The day American innocence died


I don't really agree with this common statement. I think it is boomer sentiment being extended to the greater population.

The two hundred years previous to this horrible event were not years of childlike make believe.

My family lore tells that one of my ancestors, a tough laborer, did not leave the house for days after the Lincoln assassination. He could not stop sobbing.
 
2013-11-22 06:31:07 AM
I am far too young to have a memory of the event.

But I remember learning about it in school. We were taught about it much later, and after spending your entire childhood with a black and white, good and evil, world, the fact that someone could just kill the president was a difficult thing to accept. I cannot imagine what it must have been like at the time.
 
2013-11-22 06:32:08 AM
So why did they have that sheet music with them?

- O. Stone
 
2013-11-22 06:37:41 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: MorrisBird: Third grade.  Mrs. Pendergras walked into the room and whispered in Mrs. Crandall's ear.  Mrs. Crandall told us all to go home.  At home, Mom was crying in front of the television.  The whole thing was surreal.

Yeah? I was in third grade, too

/*respectfistbump*


3rd grader too. Principal announced it over the pa. Went home early to find my (republican) mother weeping in front of the TV. Worst part for kids was the wall to wall coverage until the funeral. No kids shows at all.
 
2013-11-22 06:46:13 AM
I could say that Kennedy was overrated. That his dad was a giant scum bag who bought him the election with mob money. That he was a disrespectful womanizer, like most of the male Kennedy's are.

I could say all that.

If only some jerk hadn't shot him.

Bah.
 
Juc
2013-11-22 06:49:28 AM
That has happened a long time ago.
well more than half of the people in the world have been born after the assassination.
This is about as relevant to people now a days as the William McKinley assassination was to the boomers.
 
2013-11-22 06:49:48 AM
Is this what all y'all are talking about?

img.fark.net
 
2013-11-22 06:52:30 AM
I really do not have much of an emotional connection to this story as I was not even born yet, and my parents were only kids/teens.  I have spoken to them about it, and the way 9/11 resonates with me, is the same thing for them when it comes to emotional ties and memory.  They remember exactly where they were when they learned about Kennedy, as I (and they) remember exactly where I was when I saw 9/11 unfolding.

/sad shait bro
 
2013-11-22 06:54:31 AM

evilbryan: I could say that Kennedy was overrated. That his dad was a giant scum bag who bought him the election with mob money. That he was a disrespectful womanizer, like most of the male Kennedy's are.

I could say all that.

If only some jerk hadn't shot him.

Bah.


Try the Bobby Baker thread over in Politics.


Juc: That has happened a long time ago.
well more than half of the people in the world have been born after the assassination.
This is about as relevant to people now a days as the William McKinley assassination was to the boomers.


Gee, sorry some of us aren't "now a days" people.
 
2013-11-22 06:55:58 AM
If this happened today there would be a shiatfit over the insensitivity of continuing the performance. Spineless times we live in.
 
2013-11-22 07:00:53 AM
Remember Rosemary Kennedy.
 
2013-11-22 07:01:37 AM
I was in 5th grade.  We didn't have an intercom in our school but every room had a radio that we were allowed to listen to on special occasions like the first Mercury mission.  The principle walked into the room, whispered something to the teacher, she told us what had happened and immediately turned on the radio.  At the time, we only knew that Kennedy had been shot.  There was a bit of a delay until they pronounced him dead.  At the point that the announcement was made that he had died, school was closed.

Bob The Nob: So why did they have that sheet music with them?

- O. Stone


Most orchestras  used to have quite a bit of music "on their desk" (sometimes a whole concert season's worth) and this was probably the most appropriate piece they had on hand at the time.  But, since Kennedy was a Senator from Massachusetts before he was elected President, it wouldn't surprise me if they were in on the conspiracy and had planned this all along.  Or not.
 
2013-11-22 07:05:20 AM
www.stokowski.org
Gibson, William McHargue
Principal trombone 1955-1975

www.stokowski.org
Kahila, Kauko Emil "Koko"
Bass trombone 1952-1972

www.stokowski.org
Moyer, William
Trombone 1952-1966
 
2013-11-22 07:05:24 AM

DrBenway: Gee, sorry some of us aren't "now a days" people.


No.  We're not.  We're "once upon a time" people.
 
2013-11-22 07:10:05 AM

MorrisBird: DrBenway: Gee, sorry some of us aren't "now a days" people.

No.  We're not.  We're "once upon a time" people.


You're both Pepperidge Farm-people.
 
2013-11-22 07:12:15 AM

Public Savant: MorrisBird: DrBenway: Gee, sorry some of us aren't "now a days" people.

No.  We're not.  We're "once upon a time" people.

You're both Pepperidge Farm-people.


Pepperidge Farm remembers
 
2013-11-22 07:14:27 AM
My dad, may he rest in peace, worked as a reporter/writer.editor in the newspaper industry for fifty years. He once told me that November 22, 1963 was the only time he ever heard the phrase, "STOP THE PRESSES!"
 
2013-11-22 07:14:28 AM

Public Savant: MorrisBird: DrBenway: Gee, sorry some of us aren't "now a days" people.

No.  We're not.  We're "once upon a time" people.

You're both Pepperidge Farm-people.


Sara Lee-people. I could really go for some coffee cake right about now.
 
2013-11-22 07:22:16 AM
I turn 50 in three weeks.

My mom never talks about it but I bet it sucked being 8.5 months pregnant when that went down. It never really occurred to me until I watched that episode of Mad Men, which actually wigged me out a little.
 
2013-11-22 07:26:40 AM
An NPR commenter says "But...why didn't they run for fear America was under attack??  Why did they all just SIT there?!?!"

Clearly posted by a young person whose first national tragedy was 9/11, but a poignant question that's interesting to consider.

My first thought was they didn't run because, in 1963, despite the absurdity of regular duck-and-cover drills to protect kids from supposedly imminent Russian nuclear bombs, it was simply unthinkable that America could or would be attacked.

Adults of that day were still believing as instructed that authorities never lie and when they do it's for your own good, that families only find happiness in being like Leave it to Beaver and that it's Christian America's duty to police the earth.

And my second thought was, well, he simply did not say America was being attacked.  And that's why nobody ran.

I was four when it happened.  Mom worked at a brokerage (as secretary because women were not allowed to do big-boy stuff like trading stocks) and she saw the newsflash come over the teletype.  She's only cried once in my entire life and she simply does not get rattled.  However, she came home that day walking like a blood-drained zombie with deer-in-headlight eyes and barely strength to hold the afternoon paper in her hand.

Five years later when Martin Luther King was assassinated, the cumulative lesson for this simpleton 9-year-old was that we will never be allowed to have good leaders/heroes because bad people will always kill them.

Seven months later when Nixon was elected, a man who scared me to bits just looking at him, it confirmed to my kid-brain that only bad people win.
 
2013-11-22 07:32:34 AM
I'm only 31, but I have 2 complete days of the WLW Cincinnati broadcast from today and the following day of that year. Listening to it is like watching a very long, unsettling movie as they talk about JFK visting Dallas, some mild commentary (and comedic jabs) about the current political situation, daytime talk shows, gunshots fired, Oswald (and a great deal of information on him that's mostly glossed over now), and JFK's eventual death. Even knowing it was 50 years ago doesn't make the whole event any less creepy when you hear details unfolding in real time.
 
2013-11-22 07:42:44 AM
My WW2 purple heart veteran Grandfather was as Republican as they come.  In his workshop a photo of JFK was framed and proudly displayed.
When I was old enough to understand things a little, I asked him why he had a photo of a serious Democrat hanging in his shop, I will always remember his answer and carried it with through all my years of service.

"Because he was MY President, even though I disagree politically with Presidents they are ours because the people of America elected them.  When JFK was killed every American, Democrat or Republican, lost their President".

He was a stoic man my Grandfather, but he choked up telling me that.
 
2013-11-22 07:45:32 AM

mike_d85: This has been interesting and all, but doesn't it seem odd to make such a big deal on the 48th anniversary?

/I know a Kennedy is working in politics.
//That means it's after 1935



Really?  Nothing on that?  I expected to give someone a brain hemmorage.  You guys aren't any fun.
 
2013-11-22 07:56:05 AM
My parents were 14 in November of 1963; they remember the day as it if were yesterday.  My mom was in P. E., my dad was in math class.  They both went to Catholic school, so when a priest came to inform the teacher (a nun) what was going on, everyone was shuffled off to church right away.  I think that would have happened even if Kennedy hadn't been Catholic, but they immediately said prayers, then were all dismissed.  They spent the next four days glued to the TV with my respective grandparents, as there was nothing else on, nothing else to do, and nowhere to go.

9/11 is probably the only comparable event to the Kennedy assassination that has happened since, but even then, the whole country didn't shut down; schools didn't close, businesses didn't close.....certainly air travel stopped for a while, but it wasn't for 4 days.  It's hard to imagine the entire country grinding to a halt for that same length of time, but it did.
 
2013-11-22 07:59:13 AM

Bob The Nob: So why did they have that sheet music with them?

- O. Stone


RTFA.
 
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