If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(22 Words)   Color photo of the set from the old Addams Family TV series. Well, this ought to be interesAHHHH GOD MY EYES MY EYES   (twentytwowords.com) divider line 60
    More: Cool, television series, color photography, Addams Family  
•       •       •

14114 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 20 Nov 2013 at 8:21 PM (43 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



60 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-11-20 08:10:52 PM
Huh, that certainly changes the tone.
 
433 [TotalFark]
2013-11-20 08:15:51 PM
Wow, it looks like a bordello in there.
 
2013-11-20 08:26:21 PM
It's about as nightmarish as I expected.
 
2013-11-20 08:32:00 PM
That's a really cool set.
 
2013-11-20 08:32:01 PM
I understand you need to use certain colors to get particular tones in black and white, but goddamn...
 
2013-11-20 08:33:07 PM
Also keep in mind that set designers of the time knew that standard color stages wouldn't show up on black and white TV's that well, so they would crank the colors up to 11 to get the desired result for B&W viewers.
 
2013-11-20 08:35:59 PM
The regular cast members were used to it, but they would only let guests on the set at the last minute, preferably while filming, just so they could get the reaction shots.
 
2013-11-20 08:36:52 PM

MrSteve007: Also keep in mind that set designers of the time knew that standard color stages wouldn't show up on black and white TV's that well, so they would crank the colors up to 11 to get the desired result for B&W viewers.


As is part of the reason that when color tv came in, that some shows like Star Trek went over the top with color on the sets - y'know, so folk knew this was TV IN COLOR!

\loves me some Star Trek, but gods the colors are a bit much.....
 
2013-11-20 08:36:54 PM
Heh, pretty much like I would have imagined.
 
2013-11-20 08:39:26 PM
Nevermind the fact that the furniture of that era of the type the producers needed, didn't come in drab and dull colors, it was all bright and whorish looking.
 
2013-11-20 08:40:26 PM
Yeah. That's pretty much what I saw in my head as well.
 
2013-11-20 08:41:54 PM
Well the original TARDIS console on Doctor Who was mint green...
 
2013-11-20 08:48:08 PM
 
2013-11-20 08:48:39 PM
That would be a fantastic home to live in.  Ever since I was a small child  I wanted to be like Gomez Addams when I grew up.


/I have the bizarre sense humor but lack the money, Carolyn Jones and Ted Cassidy
 
2013-11-20 08:49:07 PM

UberNeuman: MrSteve007: Also keep in mind that set designers of the time knew that standard color stages wouldn't show up on black and white TV's that well, so they would crank the colors up to 11 to get the desired result for B&W viewers.

As is part of the reason that when color tv came in, that some shows like Star Trek went over the top with color on the sets - y'know, so folk knew this was TV IN COLOR!

\loves me some Star Trek, but gods the colors are a bit much.....


Sort of like 3D these days in movie theatres and HDTV.
 
2013-11-20 08:51:37 PM
Wow. That's pretty neato.

I liked the oversaturated colours in Star Trek.
 
2013-11-20 08:54:16 PM

OtherLittleGuy: UberNeuman: MrSteve007: Also keep in mind that set designers of the time knew that standard color stages wouldn't show up on black and white TV's that well, so they would crank the colors up to 11 to get the desired result for B&W viewers.

As is part of the reason that when color tv came in, that some shows like Star Trek went over the top with color on the sets - y'know, so folk knew this was TV IN COLOR!

\loves me some Star Trek, but gods the colors are a bit much.....

Sort of like 3D these days in movie theatres and HDTV.


Don't forget that there would still have been massive numbers of black and white tvs out there.  I'd bet a majority.
 
2013-11-20 08:55:06 PM

UberNeuman: As is part of the reason that when color tv came in, that some shows like Star Trek went over the top with color on the sets - y'know, so folk knew this was TV IN COLOR!\loves me some Star Trek, but gods the colors are a bit much.....


While I was born long after the transition to color, I did go to school for TV & film production and have played with some of the old equipment of the era. I'd imagine that the accuracy of the color capture devices wasn't that great, then much of the signal accuracy was lost in the over-the-air transmission, and early home TV sets probably weren't exactly Adobe RGB calibrated either.

What we see today, in restored digital blue-ray versions of the early color shows, likely wasn't anywhere close to what was rendered at home with similar technology:
retrothing.typepad.com
 
2013-11-20 08:56:56 PM
What, were people expecting the set to actually be in black and white?
 
2013-11-20 08:57:58 PM
It's very Victorian. Those 19th-century folk loved their garishness.
 
2013-11-20 09:01:15 PM

433: Wow, it looks like a bordello in there.


What kind of brothels do you visit?!??!?
 
2013-11-20 09:02:48 PM
I was expecting more Maroon and Gold.
 
2013-11-20 09:07:02 PM
i1182.photobucket.com
 
2013-11-20 09:25:17 PM
The cinematographers who supervised the lighting of  1960s color TV shows had a special eyepiece to show what the set looked like in B&W.  Black and White was in the majority well into the 70s, actually.

Trek looked great in color - in fact, it made NBC's parent company a ton of money by selling RCA color TVs - but it looked so-so in black and white, which also tended to have smaller screens, when people bought color sets, they bought a bigger set (bigger for the 60's that is!). (The remastered Trek looks absolutely amazing on an HD screen, especially when it is being streamed. ) Trek always scored near the top of the so-called 'color ratings'.
 
2013-11-20 09:35:56 PM
"SUBBY'S INTERNET SERVICE BACK ON AFTER A MONTH'S OUTAGE."

FTFY
 
2013-11-20 09:37:28 PM
Same thing with George Reeves' Superman costumes. It wasn't the "correct" colors until the show switched to filming in color.  i.imgur.com
 
2013-11-20 09:43:28 PM

Nem Wan: Same thing with George Reeves' Superman costumes. It wasn't the "correct" colors until the show switched to filming in color.  [i.imgur.com image 850x956]


What's weird about that suit is it looks just like it did on the show. It's further support for Calvin's dad's argument that color didn't begin to appear in the world until sometime in the 1930s.
 
2013-11-20 09:45:33 PM
What pics? Just a white screen with words and no photo. Can someone post them here?
 
2013-11-20 10:01:17 PM
i.imgur.com
 
2013-11-20 10:15:15 PM
Many Victorian area interiors were actually bright gaudy messes.
 
2013-11-20 10:15:58 PM
I'll take black and white TV anyday. Color assaults my brain.
Don't even get me started on smash cut television. Just thinking about it makes me convulse.
 
2013-11-20 10:21:45 PM

Great_Milenko: What, were people expecting the set to actually be in black and white?


Cue the Calvin & Hobbes cartoon...
 
2013-11-20 10:21:59 PM

netringer: Hey!  They had a Hookah!  The Adams druggies!

George  "Reeves's red-blue-and-yellow Superman costume was originally brown-gray-and-white, so that it would photograph in appropriate gray tones on black-and-white film."


Hookahs are not the sole province of stoners. They have traditionally been used to smoke spiced tobacco-- That is, tobacco soaked in a flavored molasses mixture.

So most of the time when you see a hookah in a setting like this, it's for tobacco.
 
2013-11-20 10:30:48 PM

ZeroCorpse: netringer: Hey!  They had a Hookah!  The Adams druggies!

George  "Reeves's red-blue-and-yellow Superman costume was originally brown-gray-and-white, so that it would photograph in appropriate gray tones on black-and-white film."

Hookahs are not the sole province of stoners. They have traditionally been used to smoke spiced tobacco-- That is, tobacco soaked in a flavored molasses mixture.

So most of the time when you see a hookah in a setting like this, it's for tobacco.


Besides, Morticia would NEVER be so crude as to smoke a cigarette, even in an absurdly long holder.
 
2013-11-20 10:53:29 PM

Nem Wan: Same thing with George Reeves' Superman costumes. It wasn't the "correct" colors until the show switched to filming in color.  [i.imgur.com image 850x956]


What the hell did he wear when he made public appearances?
 
2013-11-20 10:53:42 PM
I remember reading back when Turner was colorizing old black and white films that the criticism of that practice was that art directors carefully gauged IRL set colors to "translate" the correct depth and hues to black and white TVs of the day, and that it was a lot of work, and pretty much a science of its own.

I find that garish stage set fascinating, because when the above argument about design was mentioned I could not imagine what would have to be so different, but this pretty much fits with what I imagined.
 
2013-11-20 10:54:40 PM
http://kenlevine.blogspot.com/2013/04/i-love-lucy-in-real-color.html

I Love Lucy shot by a spectator. The Copa in 16mm color. Major set designer fapping material.
 
2013-11-20 11:02:30 PM

Mobius strip of human stupidity: http://kenlevine.blogspot.com/2013/04/i-love-lucy-in-real-color.html

I Love Lucy shot by a spectator. The Copa in 16mm color. Major set designer fapping material.


Damn that was wonderful. Thanks!

/ I love Lucy

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-11-20 11:09:23 PM

fustanella: It's very Victorian. Those 19th-century folk loved their garishness.


That's what I was thinking. The picture reminds me of a Victorian-era parlor.
 
2013-11-20 11:13:42 PM

Gyrfalcon: ZeroCorpse: netringer: Hey!  They had a Hookah!  The Adams druggies!

George  "Reeves's red-blue-and-yellow Superman costume was originally brown-gray-and-white, so that it would photograph in appropriate gray tones on black-and-white film."

Hookahs are not the sole province of stoners. They have traditionally been used to smoke spiced tobacco-- That is, tobacco soaked in a flavored molasses mixture.

So most of the time when you see a hookah in a setting like this, it's for tobacco.

Besides, Morticia would NEVER be so crude as to smoke a cigarette, even in an absurdly long holder.


31.media.tumblr.com
Do you mind if I smoke
 
2013-11-20 11:34:25 PM
So, the Addams Family turns into PeeWees Playhouse in color?  Interesting....
 
2013-11-20 11:38:54 PM

Prophet of Loss: Many Victorian area interiors were actually bright gaudy messes.


Yes, they were. I couldn't figure out why that didn't look that strange to me. But they were. Lots of big draperies and velvet and bright colors.

thumbs.dreamstime.com
 
2013-11-20 11:39:39 PM

Prophet of Loss: Many Victorian area interiors were actually bright gaudy messes.


Same with Roman & Greek temples and statues up until they started engaging in proto-archaeology and uncovering then trading old stuff which had lost its paint - making the same incorrect inference the early antiquarians did. Some of that stuff was painted to look realistic and some of it was nearly fluorescent.

The eye melting multicolour aesthetic is really popular throughout the world and through time.
 
2013-11-20 11:42:45 PM

Great_Milenko: What, were people expecting the set to actually be in black and white?


i1282.photobucket.com
 
2013-11-21 12:21:52 AM

zeppo: The cinematographers who supervised the lighting of  1960s color TV shows had a special eyepiece to show what the set looked like in B&W.  Black and White was in the majority well into the 70s, actually.

Trek looked great in color - in fact, it made NBC's parent company a ton of money by selling RCA color TVs - but it looked so-so in black and white, which also tended to have smaller screens, when people bought color sets, they bought a bigger set (bigger for the 60's that is!). (The remastered Trek looks absolutely amazing on an HD screen, especially when it is being streamed. ) Trek always scored near the top of the so-called 'color ratings'.


Came to mention this when I saw Trek mentioned upthread. That show was almost a loss-leader for RCA/NBC.
 
2013-11-21 12:25:45 AM
It is now the set for the TBN Network. I'll bet that chair is soaked with Tammy Faye Bakers tears. And mascara.
 
2013-11-21 01:22:30 AM

MrSteve007: While I was born long after the transition to color, I did go to school for TV & film production and have played with some of the old equipment of the era. I'd imagine that the accuracy of the color capture devices wasn't that great, then much of the signal accuracy was lost in the over-the-air transmission, and early home TV sets probably weren't exactly Adobe RGB calibrated either.

What we see today, in restored digital blue-ray versions of the early color shows, likely wasn't anywhere close to what was rendered at home with similar technology:


I can remember seeing my first color TV in the late 60's or so (Brinkley and Hunt was on as I recall) at my grandparents house (it was a 21" console job which according to grandpa was the biggest one that you could get at the time). We got one a few years later. Keep in mind that this was in San Francisco and not some backwater town out in the middle of nowhere. They weren't very common yet as people usually waited until their old B&W sets went on the fritz before they shelled out the big bucks for a color one.

Anyway, the old sets were not calibrated at all. There were 3 knobs on the back (Red, green and blue) along with the vertical and horizontal hold and brightness. Most of the first color sets had all of them them sticking out but people invariably ended up reaching behind to tweak one of the hold knobs (something fairly common back then as the set tended to slowly drift off of what you set them to because of vacuum tubes if I had to guess) and ended up twisting one of the color ones by mistake. Later sets had them recessed and had to be turned with a regular screwdriver. Usually when the set was delivered the guy setting it up would set the color using a test pattern generator attached to the antenna leads and a card with the right colors on it. Even then you had to wait about 5 minutes for it to warm up and then the colors would look pretty good.

As to TFA the old, old TV shows had some hideous makeup that looked positively horrendous (like green skin horrendous) but when shown on the B&W sets they looked perfectly normal. That the stage setting were garish doesn't surprise me at all.
 
2013-11-21 01:45:58 AM
i.huffpost.com

GIS "William F Buckley apartment"
 
2013-11-21 05:42:11 AM
That's altogether ooky.
 
2013-11-21 07:28:44 AM

fusillade762: zeppo: The cinematographers who supervised the lighting of  1960s color TV shows had a special eyepiece to show what the set looked like in B&W.  Black and White was in the majority well into the 70s, actually.

Trek looked great in color - in fact, it made NBC's parent company a ton of money by selling RCA color TVs - but it looked so-so in black and white, which also tended to have smaller screens, when people bought color sets, they bought a bigger set (bigger for the 60's that is!). (The remastered Trek looks absolutely amazing on an HD screen, especially when it is being streamed. ) Trek always scored near the top of the so-called 'color ratings'.

Came to mention this when I saw Trek mentioned upthread. That show was almost a loss-leader for RCA/NBC.


And KILLED Desilu - which was also producing Mission Impossible, another expensive show, at the same time.
 
Displayed 50 of 60 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report