If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The Hollywood Reporter)   It's lights out for Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark   (hollywoodreporter.com) divider line 19
    More: Fail, Turn Off the Dark, Spider-Man, Broadway, Julie Taymor, Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, The Edge, foxwoods casino, Michael Cohl  
•       •       •

2489 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 19 Nov 2013 at 9:03 AM (21 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



19 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-11-19 08:38:21 AM
It was a longer run than I expected.
 
2013-11-19 09:06:22 AM
pleated-jeans.com
 
2013-11-19 09:14:00 AM
Oh goodie I haven't seen any Spiderman memes in a while! One of my faves.
 
2013-11-19 09:30:04 AM
The fail tag is for subtard who didn't RTFA.
 
2013-11-19 10:21:47 AM
thank god.
 
2013-11-19 10:30:41 AM
*falls off stage, dies*
 
2013-11-19 11:31:49 AM

DecemberNitro: *falls off stage, dies*


I was volunteering with a children's (7-14) community theatre company years ago. One of the kids was just a little shiat, you know? Always acting out for attention, always cracking "jokes" that weren't funny - he'd intentionally flub his lines during audition and "accidentally" say "booger" or something.

Anyway, one of the rules there was that every kid gets some sort of part in the show. We were doing...I think it was Into the Woods. Anyway, there was a cow. This kid, not surprisingly, became the back end of a cow.

The show was put on in an actual theatre, with a stage and a (small) orchestra pit.

On opening night, the cow comes on and wanders around stage. The little shiat kid, whose only job was to follow the other kid around while under a sheet and stand still when the cow stands still, starts farking around. While the cow is standing still at one point, he starts kinda dancing, stomping his feet, visibly picking his nose under the sheet, that sort of thing.

Finally, this ends with him wandering off a bit and falling off the damn stage into the orchestra pit, pulling the cow costume off of the other kid. We had to stop production, go fish him out of the orchestra pit (he was unhurt, but he acted like he'd broken every bone in his body). We asked him to not return.

That's how I felt when I read about Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark.
 
2013-11-19 01:01:33 PM
Has anyone seen it? Should I go see this on Broadway before it closes?
 
2013-11-19 01:48:02 PM
I keep telling people: the hell of it is, this COULD have worked.

Of course they react as if I'm nuts, but the truth is, you can make anything "work" if the results come together. Combine the acrobatics of Cirque de Soleil with a West Side Story urban background and the Jacobean revenge fantasies that sometimes popped up in the Silver Age, songs by one of the most popular rock stars in the industry, and a modern book with Avengers/Whedon influences, and you might actually have something that would get young males interested in musical theater. "Les Miserables" and "Evita" don't sound like projects that would lend themselves particularly well to the Great White Way, either.

Well...maybe it's more accurate to say that I WANTED it to work. I'm a comic book nerd with a musical theater education. This thing could have been fun just to look at.

Then I bought the cast recording. And this was the original cast recording, before they redid the whole thing after those disastrous previews. The songs start out okay - just okay - and then get progressively worse until they sound like something you'd hear from a road production of "Annie." The music was uncontainably awful. You're supposed to walk out of the theater humming it, but for the life of me I can't remember a single bit of it except the lead's terrible metal-wail from "The Boy Falls From the Sky."

Anyone on Fark actually see this disgrace? With the feeling that you'd paid your money's worth for an engaging and uplifting theatrical experience?
 
2013-11-19 01:50:35 PM

Rude Turnip: Has anyone seen it? Should I go see this on Broadway before it closes?


I haven't seen it, but I did enjoy this video review on the show
 
2013-11-19 01:59:44 PM

Lord Dimwit: DecemberNitro: *falls off stage, dies*

I was volunteering with a children's (7-14) community theatre company years ago. One of the kids was just a little shiat, you know? Always acting out for attention, always cracking "jokes" that weren't funny - he'd intentionally flub his lines during audition and "accidentally" say "booger" or something.

Anyway, one of the rules there was that every kid gets some sort of part in the show. We were doing...I think it was Into the Woods. Anyway, there was a cow. This kid, not surprisingly, became the back end of a cow.

The show was put on in an actual theatre, with a stage and a (small) orchestra pit.

On opening night, the cow comes on and wanders around stage. The little shiat kid, whose only job was to follow the other kid around while under a sheet and stand still when the cow stands still, starts farking around. While the cow is standing still at one point, he starts kinda dancing, stomping his feet, visibly picking his nose under the sheet, that sort of thing.

Finally, this ends with him wandering off a bit and falling off the damn stage into the orchestra pit, pulling the cow costume off of the other kid. We had to stop production, go fish him out of the orchestra pit (he was unhurt, but he acted like he'd broken every bone in his body). We asked him to not return.

That's how I felt when I read about Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark.


And yet this same formula made for a hilarious movie in Top Secret!
 
2013-11-19 02:02:56 PM
I just remembered, Jim Millan, the guy producing Alton Brown's current tour, was one of the show doctors that was brought in to try and save the show.  He talked about what he did to try to help fix it and what some of the problems were with it when Alton interviewed him on his podcast (32:50 mark).
 
2013-11-19 02:17:20 PM
I actually saw the show a couple months ago. It wasn't ... any worse than "Bring It On: the Musical" or "Ghost: The Musical" or any of the other shows where the production starts from the question of how to make money on Broadway rather than how to tell an interesting and compelling story that will make people feel things.

I've heard through the grapevine that the show cost more like $110M than $75, which is way way way less than a Cirque show. I'm also told that when they moved into the Foxwoods, they hadn't gotten around to writing the second act yet. So really all they came up with was a bunch of visuals that they kind of hoped might tell a story.

I agree with Peasandcarrots that the show COULD have been good, if they had taken the time to build a compelling story and memorable songs. But I got the sense that they just kind of phoned it in. The special effects .... I mean it was cool seeing a dude flying around the theater at 40 mph. But it's no cooler than any decent circus act. The rest of it kind of boiled down to strobe lights and fog machines.

I'm a bit surprised they lasted this long. But apparently they're retooling it into an arena tour, like the batman one that went around (or is going around?). And assuming they can get the running costs down (non-union tour will cut costs quite a bit), it could be really popular. I also suspect that they'll end up licensing the flight technology they developed to other theaters and the investors/producers will make quite a bit from that.
 
2013-11-19 02:42:26 PM

peterquince: I actually saw the show a couple months ago. It wasn't ... any worse than "Bring It On: the Musical" rabid wombats gnawing on my vas deferens or "Ghost: The Musical"

sitting on a toilet seat in a Chinese bus station and catching cancerAIDS. . .
 
2013-11-19 04:25:56 PM
Sesame Street did a pretty good parody with Grover as "Spider Monster: The Musical"
 
2013-11-19 04:45:35 PM
Vegas is a much better home for it than broadway.
 
2013-11-19 05:39:06 PM
FTA: "Our years on Broadway have afforded us the opportunity to build an internationally recognized brand, and Las Vegas, with its year-round stream of tourists seeking the world's best entertainment, is the natural home for this next incarnation," said Cohl and Harris in a statement released Tuesday.

The first sentence is key. They were interested in creating a "brand" that could be taken on tour and make a boatload of money, the whole plot/characters/emotion thing was secondary. Plus, as soon as I saw Bono and The Edge were involved, I knew it was doomed, they've almost completely forgotten how to write good songs in the past decade.

People go to Vegas for "the world's best entertainment"? Hahahahaha, that's classic. The fact that the utterly ghastly Celine Dion is still a major draw there undercuts that argument.

/Gambling
//Hookers
///Cheap drugs
////That's Vegas, baby
 
2013-11-19 07:15:49 PM
Will it win an award for Most Awkward Play Name of the Year?
 
2013-11-20 04:48:18 AM

peterquince: I'm a bit surprised they lasted this long. But apparently they're retooling it into an arena tour, like the batman one that went around (or is going around?). And assuming they can get the running costs down (non-union tour will cut costs quite a bit), it could be really popular. I also suspect that they'll end up licensing the flight technology they developed to other theaters and the investors/producers will make quite a bit from that.


I saw that Batman show when it hit Denver earlier this year. It was pretty cool. The music REALLY sounded like they planned a musical though, as it built up perfectly for the actors to break into song... but didn't.  It was a little offputting, actually, because of that.  I was ready to embrace a singing dynamic duo, too.
 
Displayed 19 of 19 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report