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(Nature)   Ancient DNA once again reveals human behavior to be a cross between time travel and Chatroulette   (nature.com) divider line 48
    More: Obvious, Chatroulette, DNA, Ancient DNA, Denisovans, genomes, paleoanthropologist, human behavior, human ancestor  
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3851 clicks; posted to Geek » on 19 Nov 2013 at 9:56 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



48 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-11-19 08:18:15 AM  
Dude, is she even human?

Meh, close enough.
 
2013-11-19 10:18:30 AM  
Wanted for questioning  img.fark.net
 
2013-11-19 10:19:37 AM  
The meeting was abuzz with conjecture about the identity of this potentially new population of humans. "We don't have the faintest idea," says Chris Stringer, a paleoanthropologist at the London Natural History Museum, who was not involved in the work.

It's Sasquatch. Duh.
 
2013-11-19 10:21:20 AM  
hmm, if we don't find or create another hominid species with which to interbreed, are we doomed?

I'm not necessarily volunteering, but I wouldn't mind pictures...
 
2013-11-19 10:29:49 AM  
I'd get freaky with it.
 
2013-11-19 10:37:13 AM  
Dang; how awesome is it to think that stories about big muscular meat-eating humanoids like ogres might be inspired by Neanderthals, and other "fantasy" humans by other extinct branches of the hominid family tree? This is so cool :)
 
2013-11-19 10:42:05 AM  

Heron: Dang; how awesome is it to think that stories about big muscular meat-eating humanoids like ogres might be inspired by Neanderthals, and other "fantasy" humans by other extinct branches of the hominid family tree? This is so cool :)


I'm just so sad they're not still around.
 
2013-11-19 10:46:19 AM  
It's miscegenation all the way down to the turtles who are farking human-turtle hybrids, man.
 
2013-11-19 10:54:56 AM  
On a more serious note, this really does play merry hell with the old theories of human evolution, and evidence has been building for years.

There was not, apparently, a wave or three out of Africa in which modern sapiens replaced other populations.

In reality, it would appear, what we used to consider "modern humans" split into different groups and had wild monkey-sex with other "near-sapiens" populations, and that is what made modern humans. Africans bred with some groups we haven't named yet, Europeans bred with Neandertals, some Asians bred with Neandertals and Denisovans whilst the the latter two were farking each other...it's a big web of farking around the world.

Modern humans are not who we thought we were. We are, essentially, what happens when what we thought were anatomically modern humans farks everything else that's a hominid and can talk.

We are Ninja from Die Antwoord writ large across the globe. Every single vaguely-human population, farked into one person, just in varying percentages.
 
2013-11-19 10:55:31 AM  
It blows my mind so much that tags are literally cast off into the aether.
 
2013-11-19 11:28:53 AM  
I guess we really DO like rape...
 
2013-11-19 11:43:48 AM  

Rev. Skarekroe: The meeting was abuzz with conjecture about the identity of this potentially new population of humans. "We don't have the faintest idea," says Chris Stringer, a paleoanthropologist at the London Natural History Museum, who was not involved in the work.

It's Sasquatch. Duh.


imnotsayingitwasaliens.jpg
 
2013-11-19 11:45:30 AM  

Lady Indica: Heron: Dang; how awesome is it to think that stories about big muscular meat-eating humanoids like ogres might be inspired by Neanderthals, and other "fantasy" humans by other extinct branches of the hominid family tree? This is so cool :)

I'm just so sad they're not still around.


I thought they are and are typically called gingers.

/I can't think of any I got to know and liked.
 
2013-11-19 11:47:16 AM  

grumpfuff: Rev. Skarekroe: The meeting was abuzz with conjecture about the identity of this potentially new population of humans. "We don't have the faintest idea," says Chris Stringer, a paleoanthropologist at the London Natural History Museum, who was not involved in the work.

It's Sasquatch. Duh.

imnotsayingitwasaliens.jpg


I thought the headline started with Ancient Aliens, and figured that guy would be the first fence-stick.
 
2013-11-19 11:56:35 AM  

Sybarite: Dude, is she even human?

Meh, close enough.


Pretty sure I went i home with a hobbit last Satruday night.
 
2013-11-19 12:00:41 PM  
Once alcohol became common, a single interbred race was inevitable.
 
2013-11-19 12:07:28 PM  
So modern humans came out of africa and basically farked anything with two legs that couldn't run or fly away from them. Thus producing all the various different races we see now?

Want to mess with a racist? Fill them in on the fact that Africans may well be the most pure HUMAN as far as DNA goes. That white supremacist has neanderthal and who knows what else floating around in their past. Who's pure now biatches?
 
2013-11-19 12:09:36 PM  
Baelz

So modern humans came out of africa and basically farked anything with two legs that couldn't run or fly away from them. Thus producing all the various different races we see now?

Want to mess with a racist? Fill them in on the fact that Africans may well be the most pure HUMAN as far as DNA goes. That white supremacist has neanderthal and who knows what else floating around in their past. Who's pure now biatches?


Not Africans...they bred with their own form of semi-sapiens...

Everyone did, apparently.
 
2013-11-19 12:36:31 PM  
I like big brows and I cannot lie.
 
2013-11-19 12:58:49 PM  

Baelz: So modern humans came out of africa and basically farked anything with two legs that couldn't run or fly away from them. Thus producing all the various different races we see now?


Not exactly, no. The racial differences we see today are not related in any way to the small genetic differences inherited from interbreeding.

Really want to mess with a racist? Point out that genetic differences between modern humans are so small that if we were dogs, we'd all be the same breed.

Facetious_Speciest: Not Africans...they bred with their own form of semi-sapiens...


Also this. In addition, this seems to have been going on as far back as we can tell: there's growing evidence that archaic hominims were cross-breeding into each others' populations even before groups started leaving Africa.
 
2013-11-19 01:19:34 PM  

TheGogmagog: Lady Indica: Heron: Dang; how awesome is it to think that stories about big muscular meat-eating humanoids like ogres might be inspired by Neanderthals, and other "fantasy" humans by other extinct branches of the hominid family tree? This is so cool :)

I'm just so sad they're not still around.

I thought they are and are typically called gingers.

/I can't think of any I got to know and liked.


Guess what I am. Go on, guess!

/dark auburn & freckles
//soulless
 
2013-11-19 01:22:57 PM  

Lady Indica: TheGogmagog: Lady Indica: Heron: Dang; how awesome is it to think that stories about big muscular meat-eating humanoids like ogres might be inspired by Neanderthals, and other "fantasy" humans by other extinct branches of the hominid family tree? This is so cool :)

I'm just so sad they're not still around.

I thought they are and are typically called gingers.

/I can't think of any I got to know and liked.

Guess what I am. Go on, guess!

/dark auburn & freckles
//soulless


Redheads r teh awsum
 
2013-11-19 01:43:42 PM  

Lady Indica: TheGogmagog: Lady Indica: Heron: Dang; how awesome is it to think that stories about big muscular meat-eating humanoids like ogres might be inspired by Neanderthals, and other "fantasy" humans by other extinct branches of the hominid family tree? This is so cool :)

I'm just so sad they're not still around.

I thought they are and are typically called gingers.

/I can't think of any I got to know and liked.

Guess what I am. Go on, guess!

/dark auburn & freckles
//soulless


I guess incredibly hot.  What do I win?
 
2013-11-19 01:47:50 PM  

TheGogmagog: Lady Indica: Heron: Dang; how awesome is it to think that stories about big muscular meat-eating humanoids like ogres might be inspired by Neanderthals, and other "fantasy" humans by other extinct branches of the hominid family tree? This is so cool :)

I'm just so sad they're not still around.

I thought they are and are typically called gingers.

.



www.reelmama.com
 
2013-11-19 02:23:40 PM  

Lady Indica: Guess what I am. Go on, guess!


farm7.staticflickr.com
 
2013-11-19 02:34:51 PM  
i1168.photobucket.com


Do you know what the last Xon said just before he died? [clutches chest] AAAAGGGHHHH!
 
2013-11-19 02:49:47 PM  
So the Harkness Test is not a recent invention, then.
 
2013-11-19 03:38:12 PM  
I am not surprised that every male in history only wanted to sink it in the pink.
 
2013-11-19 03:55:34 PM  
The Out of Africa theory has a competing theory in which humans evolved simultaneously on the three Old World continents.

The Denisovans, Neaderthals, modern humans and at least one African species seem to have lived together for quite some time. There's also the "Hobbits". We know that some Neanderthals interbred with humans in Europe and the Middle East, possibly North Africa as well. The Denisovans moved East and have left genes among the humans who inhabit Indonesia, Macronesia and so forth. So we do have non-human ancestry, although only a few percent of our genes are non-human. There seems to be traces of another African species that interbred with our African ancestors before they left via Saudi Arabia or the Sinai.

This "mystery" species is probably not that different from the others we arlready know about.

It would be interesting to explore a multi-species world and see how more than one species might be able to live together. Perhaps prejudice would lead to genocide, or perhaps specialization would lead to adaptations that would further separate the species the way they are specialized for war or trade or peaceful agrarian societies in shows like the original Star Trek, etc.

It would be a definite learning opportunity if we could find such a world or explore our own past in more detail. Despite diversification over the last 90,000-150,000 years, we are all one species and there's nothing to prevent interbreeding, although we can't all be basketball players or fashion models.
 
2013-11-19 04:05:12 PM  

SovietCanuckistan: I am not surprised that every male in history only wanted to sink it in the pink.


Men have attempted to procreate with every domesticated mammal. If it wasn't for limitations of biology there would exist satyrs, centaurs, and minotaurs.
 
2013-11-19 04:21:57 PM  

MyEnamine: SovietCanuckistan: I am not surprised that every male in history only wanted to sink it in the pink.

Men have attempted to procreate with every domesticated mammal. If it wasn't for limitations of biology there would exist satyrs, centaurs, and minotaurs.


Given that all cats but the cheetah can hybridize, and all canids save the foxes, one has to wonder if bonobo-human crosses, even if "mules", have ever been attempted.

And then swiftly killed.
 
2013-11-19 04:23:25 PM  

brantgoose: The Out of Africa theory has a competing theory in which humans evolved simultaneously on the three Old World continents.

The Denisovans, Neaderthals, modern humans and at least one African species seem to have lived together for quite some time. There's also the "Hobbits". We know that some Neanderthals interbred with humans in Europe and the Middle East, possibly North Africa as well. The Denisovans moved East and have left genes among the humans who inhabit Indonesia, Macronesia and so forth. So we do have non-human ancestry, although only a few percent of our genes are non-human. There seems to be traces of another African species that interbred with our African ancestors before they left via Saudi Arabia or the Sinai.

This "mystery" species is probably not that different from the others we arlready know about.

It would be interesting to explore a multi-species world and see how more than one species might be able to live together. Perhaps prejudice would lead to genocide, or perhaps specialization would lead to adaptations that would further separate the species the way they are specialized for war or trade or peaceful agrarian societies in shows like the original Star Trek, etc.

It would be a definite learning opportunity if we could find such a world or explore our own past in more detail. Despite diversification over the last 90,000-150,000 years, we are all one species and there's nothing to prevent interbreeding, although we can't all be basketball players or fashion models.


Perhaps prejudice is hard wired into modern humans from the days when you had to protect your mate from Dennisons or the Hobbit people?
 
2013-11-19 04:42:04 PM  

Valiente: Given that all cats but the cheetah can hybridize, and all canids save the foxes, one has to wonder if bonobo-human crosses, even if "mules", have ever been attempted.

And then swiftly killed.


Relevant to your interests.
 
2013-11-19 05:48:09 PM  

brantgoose: It would be interesting to explore a multi-species world and see how more than one species might be able to live together. Perhaps prejudice would lead to genocide, or perhaps specialization would lead to adaptations that would further separate the species the way they are specialized for war or trade or peaceful agrarian societies in shows like the original Star Trek, etc.


I think the "Hominids" trilogy by Robert J. Sawyer covered that idea.
 
2013-11-19 08:00:23 PM  

anfrind: brantgoose: It would be interesting to explore a multi-species world and see how more than one species might be able to live together. Perhaps prejudice would lead to genocide, or perhaps specialization would lead to adaptations that would further separate the species the way they are specialized for war or trade or peaceful agrarian societies in shows like the original Star Trek, etc.

I think the "Hominids" trilogy by Robert J. Sawyer covered that idea.


Never made it to the third book. Worth finishing?
 
kth
2013-11-19 08:51:16 PM  

Titanius Anglesmith: Wanted for questioning  [img.fark.net image 850x478]


Dibs on Apollo. Or Tyrol. Or both.
 
2013-11-19 09:57:16 PM  

MyEnamine: SovietCanuckistan: I am not surprised that every male in history only wanted to sink it in the pink.

Men have attempted to procreate with every domesticated mammal. If it wasn't for limitations of biology there would exist satyrs, centaurs, and minotaurs.


Don't forget the gerbilmen, and the chicken people.
 
2013-11-20 01:46:43 AM  

Vanis: anfrind: brantgoose: It would be interesting to explore a multi-species world and see how more than one species might be able to live together. Perhaps prejudice would lead to genocide, or perhaps specialization would lead to adaptations that would further separate the species the way they are specialized for war or trade or peaceful agrarian societies in shows like the original Star Trek, etc.

I think the "Hominids" trilogy by Robert J. Sawyer covered that idea.

Never made it to the third book. Worth finishing?


No. The Neanderthal cuts of some guys balls, and then he becomes way happier without balls.
 
2013-11-20 04:32:38 AM  

Agarista: hmm, if we don't find or create another hominid species with which to interbreed, are we doomed?

I'm not necessarily volunteering, but I wouldn't mind pictures...


They've already been discovered at a place called "Wal-Mart". Apparently the population is pretty large and widespread (you can take that several ways). Not sure they'll make good breeding stock but they certainly are a different species.
 
2013-11-20 09:32:46 AM  

Rev. Skarekroe: Valiente: Given that all cats but the cheetah can hybridize, and all canids save the foxes, one has to wonder if bonobo-human crosses, even if "mules", have ever been attempted.

And then swiftly killed.

Relevant to your interests.


Get your sperm offa me, you damned dirty ape!
 
2013-11-20 01:18:17 PM  

RedVentrue: Don't forget the gerbilmen, and the chicken people.


i103.photobucket.com
 
2013-11-20 03:54:16 PM  

WereBear666: I guess we really DO like rape...


While rape isn't a modern invention, the available evidence suggests most pre-historic human nomadic societies would have been organized in such a way that rape was unlikely and deeply discouraged. Basically, it's probable that humans practiced a sort of group-wide persistent polyamory like that of bonobos, combined with social taboos against jealousy, disrespect, and controlling behavior that would have strongly discouraged such behavior. If you want a good summary of the relevant research, check out Sex at Dawn.
 
2013-11-20 03:58:16 PM  

Facetious_Speciest: On a more serious note, this really does play merry hell with the old theories of human evolution, and evidence has been building for years.

There was not, apparently, a wave or three out of Africa in which modern sapiens replaced other populations.

In reality, it would appear, what we used to consider "modern humans" split into different groups and had wild monkey-sex with other "near-sapiens" populations, and that is what made modern humans. Africans bred with some groups we haven't named yet, Europeans bred with Neandertals, some Asians bred with Neandertals and Denisovans whilst the the latter two were farking each other...it's a big web of farking around the world.

Modern humans are not who we thought we were. We are, essentially, what happens when what we thought were anatomically modern humans farks everything else that's a hominid and can talk.

We are Ninja from Die Antwoord writ large across the globe. Every single vaguely-human population, farked into one person, just in varying percentages.


Not "near-sapiens"; other species of the Homo line. These were humans, just different varieties than our own, and likely just as intelligent.
 
2013-11-20 04:02:23 PM  
Heron

Not "near-sapiens"; other species of the Homo line. These were humans, just different varieties than our own, and likely just as intelligent.

Shorthand. We're homo sapiens sapiens, as opposed to (for example) homo sapiens neanderthalensis.

We are the sapiensest.
 
2013-11-20 04:18:37 PM  

Valiente: MyEnamine: SovietCanuckistan: I am not surprised that every male in history only wanted to sink it in the pink.

Men have attempted to procreate with every domesticated mammal. If it wasn't for limitations of biology there would exist satyrs, centaurs, and minotaurs.

Given that all cats but the cheetah can hybridize, and all canids save the foxes, one has to wonder if bonobo-human crosses, even if "mules", have ever been attempted.

And then swiftly killed.


In our far ancestors maybe, but I don't think we're still compatible at this point. I have heard talk of getting rid of the Pan designation and including Bonobos and Chimpanzees in the Homo line though.
 
2013-11-20 04:19:14 PM  

Facetious_Speciest: Heron

Not "near-sapiens"; other species of the Homo line. These were humans, just different varieties than our own, and likely just as intelligent.

Shorthand. We're homo sapiens sapiens, as opposed to (for example) homo sapiens neanderthalensis.

We are the sapiensest.


fair enough :p
 
2013-11-20 05:18:21 PM  

Facetious_Speciest: Heron

Not "near-sapiens"; other species of the Homo line. These were humans, just different varieties than our own, and likely just as intelligent.

Shorthand. We're homo sapiens sapiens, as opposed to (for example) homo sapiens neanderthalensis.

We are the sapiensest.


Living up to your Fark handle, I see.
 
2013-11-20 06:23:15 PM  
czetie

Living up to your Fark handle, I see.

Opportunities to do so are relatively rare on the ground; I have to take what I can get.
 
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