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(YouTube) Video Eight-year-old soccer player: I'm going to score a goal with a move so cool, I'll even do it twice   (youtube.com) divider line 31
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6387 clicks; posted to Video » on 19 Nov 2013 at 8:11 AM (35 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



31 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-11-19 08:15:19 AM
Yes, too bad it's still soccer.
 
2013-11-19 08:21:32 AM
Thats an extremely standard move. Thats only slightly fancier than dribbling.
 
2013-11-19 08:24:23 AM
8-year-olds dude.  If you can coach anyone to play any defense beyond "run toward ball and kick", the very gods will descend from the skies and ask YOU to make miracles for THEM.
 
2013-11-19 08:26:48 AM

dragonchild: 8-year-olds dude.  If you can coach anyone to play any defense beyond "run toward ball and kick", the very gods will descend from the skies and ask YOU to make miracles for THEM.


Truer words have never been spoken.

My kids managed an accidental Give and Go to a score exactly once.  I don't care that it was utter luck.  It nearly moved me to tears.
 
2013-11-19 08:35:15 AM
The skill level difference between some kids at 6-8 years old is horrific.  My son is on a U8 recreation (rec) league - one kid basically cries every time the ball hits him anywhere but the foot, there is one player  on his team who can dribble through traffic almost with impunity.  One or two of the others are easily distracted and have been known to wander off while playing goalie early in the season.  Their coach did a nice job improving them over the year and they beat just about every other rec team easily.

We played a U7 travel team last weekend (kids one year younger) - we managed to hang with them 3-2 after one quarter but the game ended 8-3 - they had at least 3 kids who could rip a well placed shot with either foot immediately after making a skilled move past a defender.
 
2013-11-19 08:41:49 AM
Here's a good example of why Europeans are better at soccer.
Those U9 teams are run by teams in the Bundesliga.
You can bet that child is already getting top quality coaching.
 
2013-11-19 08:44:41 AM

Fizpez: The skill level difference between some kids at 6-8 years old is horrific.  My son is on a U8 recreation (rec) league - one kid basically cries every time the ball hits him anywhere but the foot, there is one player  on his team who can dribble through traffic almost with impunity.  One or two of the others are easily distracted and have been known to wander off while playing goalie early in the season.  Their coach did a nice job improving them over the year and they beat just about every other rec team easily.

We played a U7 travel team last weekend (kids one year younger) - we managed to hang with them 3-2 after one quarter but the game ended 8-3 - they had at least 3 kids who could rip a well placed shot with either foot immediately after making a skilled move past a defender.


This. My son would pick the grass while there was a kid on his team who was good enough to be trash talking.
 
2013-11-19 09:19:45 AM

TeamEd: You can bet that child is already getting top quality coaching.


Notice that- for example- there wasn't a pack of 20 kids all within 10 yards of the ball. Contrast that with an American youth team. The Euros get drilled in the fundamentals early.
 
2013-11-19 09:19:55 AM

Fizpez: there is one player on his team who can dribble through traffic almost with impunity. One or two of the others are easily distracted and have been known to wander off while playing goalie early in the season.


I think defenders tend to be late bloomers.  It's easier to teach kids ball-handling at that age as that keeps them engaged; it's tough to teach a kid to think without the ball.  Doesn't help that TV only shows scoring highlights (yes they do happen) so pretty much all kids want to be forwards or midfielders at that age.
 
2013-11-19 09:28:54 AM
Yea, kickball! I bet no one keeps score and everyone gets a trophy too.
 
2013-11-19 09:49:31 AM
When does he fall on the ground, grab his shin and cry like a baby?
 
2013-11-19 09:51:27 AM
That was nuts to see spacing in a U9 game. My son's U8 team got taught spacing every practice. Every once in awhile they would do it and score a goal. As for American kids wanting to be a forward or midfielder, that is very true. Although my son loves being a forward, he really likes being defense or goalie.
 
2013-11-19 09:57:23 AM
As stated there are huge differences at this age. My sons last year of rec soccer U8 he averaged 7 goals a game. He then went on to play competitive/travel and he was a good player but certainly not nearly as dominant. coaching is everything at this age. the kids who want to excel and work hard enough will rise to the top later on.
 
2013-11-19 10:00:16 AM

Go_Guins: Yea, kickball! I bet no one keeps score and everyone gets a trophy too.


That, or these are kids who are already being looked at as potential professional players.

Check out the jersey sponsors- Phantasialand (a fairly major amusement park) for one team, and LG for the other. That ain't Chico's Bail Bonds.

This isn't like having a local Little League team called the Yankees. It's more like the New York Yankees having a Little League team.
 
2013-11-19 10:39:03 AM

Gonz: That, or these are kids who are already being looked at as potential professional players.


Before the adolescent growth spurt?  Isn't that kind of like judging a meal by going to the farm and looking at a handful of seeds?
 
2013-11-19 10:59:19 AM

TeamEd: Here's a good example of why Europeans are better at soccer.
Those U9 teams are run by teams in the Bundesliga.
You can bet that child is already getting top quality coaching.


You forgot something:

The kids don't weigh 2x the median weight for their age group.
 
2013-11-19 11:26:29 AM

dragonchild: Gonz: That, or these are kids who are already being looked at as potential professional players.

Before the adolescent growth spurt?  Isn't that kind of like judging a meal by going to the farm and looking at a handful of seeds?


Lionel Messi's 5'7". Diego Maradona was 5'5". Ronaldinho and Gareth Bale are both 6'0", and Zinedine Zidane and Cristiano Ronaldo are both 6'1".

So I don't think clubs are overly concerned about height. This isn't the NBA, where there's a decided advantage in being 6'8".
 
2013-11-19 11:41:48 AM

Gonz: Lionel Messi's 5'7". Diego Maradona was 5'5". Ronaldinho and Gareth Bale are both 6'0", and Zinedine Zidane and Cristiano Ronaldo are both 6'1".

So I don't think clubs are overly concerned about height. This isn't the NBA, where there's a decided advantage in being 6'8".


Bad examples due to confirmation bias AND you missed the point.  Ronaldo is Ronaldo because he DIDN'T wake up one day and measure 6'8".  On the flip side, what if your U-8 GK tops out at 5'6"?  And that's just the most rudimentary aspect of a kid's athleticism.

I'm all for teaching a kid soccer, but I wouldn't want a scout anywhere near a kid at an age where he could just as easily pretend he's dinosaur.
 
2013-11-19 12:28:27 PM
My son used to play rep soccer...there was a kid at around age 10 who was so good he was nearly running circles around the competition literally.  He scored about 4 or 5 goals per game.  Within 4 years he wasn't even good enough to be on the team anymore.  He was so advanced athletically beyond his peers at age 10 but he was an early bloomer, everyone caught up and kicked his ass by age 14.  Recruiting kids under age 12 is just dumb.
 
2013-11-19 12:31:43 PM

BowtoMogul: Thats an extremely standard move. Thats only slightly fancier than dribbling.


Submitting video to show us your skills?
 
2013-11-19 12:41:46 PM
Wonder what happened to "Little Zidane"?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HoEr1unYXRk">http://www.youtube.com/w atch?v=HoEr1unYXRk

TURN SOUND DOWN BEFORE CLICK

Red_Fox: My son used to play rep soccer...there was a kid at around age 10 who was so good he was nearly running circles around the competition literally.  He scored about 4 or 5 goals per game.  Within 4 years he wasn't even good enough to be on the team anymore.  He was so advanced athletically beyond his peers at age 10 but he was an early bloomer, everyone caught up and kicked his ass by age 14.  Recruiting kids under age 12 is just dumb.


The difference in training is a good reason the US bats below average in the World Cup. The systems make a better player (at the expense of all else).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ajax_Youth_Academy
 
2013-11-19 12:44:56 PM
i coached when my oldest was in U7.  the first month we never practiced with a ball, just played keep away - the other teams would score like crazy.  that all ended when i introduced the ball into the keep away drills.  it was amazing to watch them pass the ball past the other teams who were so cocksure after trumping us a few weeks before.  it was a great experience and i couldn't believe the number of parents that wanted me to coach again the following year.  one of the coaches asked to be my assistant because it was clear my coaching style had an impact.
 
2013-11-19 01:01:55 PM
It was a good move, but I figure when that kid tries that maneuver against more experienced opponents, he'll be knocked right out of his shoes.
 
2013-11-19 01:09:34 PM
Would still rather watch crack baby basketball.
 
2013-11-19 01:16:50 PM
This seems a good place to ask: There's currently a commercial for cameras, I believe Canon, that has kids playing soccer. They look to be about 4-5 years old. They're doing headers and bicycle kicks. Is that possible and is it real, or is that a fake commercial?

/mother-in-law says it's got to be fake; wife says there are awesome gymnastic and other athletic kids at that age so it's possibly real.
/I abstained, because we were at the in-laws for dinner and I was focused on the Bears game and not getting in between those two ladies.
 
2013-11-19 01:39:05 PM

skrame: There's currently a commercial for cameras, I believe Canon, that has kids playing soccer. They look to be about 4-5 years old. They're doing headers and bicycle kicks. Is that possible and is it real, or is that a fake commercial?


Without even looking at the commercial let me try to change your mindset:  Anything on camera edited for public consumption is staged.  I expect there are 5-year-olds that can actually perform bicycle kicks, if perhaps inconsistently.  What matters to a coach is consistency, but studios don't need that.  The studio can film a bunch of takes and only use the ones they want.  The kid could very well be doing a bicycle kick, but if what you see in the commercial is the only time in a dozen tries the ball actually went where it was supposed to go, is it real or fake?  People can do some pretty nifty things if given all the chances in the world to do it right exactly once.

The other thing is that these are showy plays that aren't difficult to perform in unstressful situations (at least with some practice) so much as impractical in most game situations.  They're fun to do so I'd be shocked if there was a professional player at any level who couldn't do these.  The reason why they're rare in games is that they're intensely situational, and the just-right circumstances where it makes sense to use these techniques don't come up often.  For example, a bicycle kick starts out with the kicker facing away from the target.  That's generally not an ideal situation, and 99 times out of 100 the player can better improve the situation by just turning around.
 
2013-11-19 02:03:04 PM

skrame: This seems a good place to ask: There's currently a commercial for cameras, I believe Canon, that has kids playing soccer. They look to be about 4-5 years old. They're doing headers and bicycle kicks. Is that possible and is it real, or is that a fake commercial?

/mother-in-law says it's got to be fake; wife says there are awesome gymnastic and other athletic kids at that age so it's possibly real.
/I abstained, because we were at the in-laws for dinner and I was focused on the Bears game and not getting in between those two ladies.


It is fake. I have seen a great number of poorly Photoshopped images in my time as a photographer and I can tell by the pixels that it is a fake.

/snark aside it does look shopped.
 
2013-11-19 04:04:26 PM

asciibaron: i coached when my oldest was in U7.  the first month we never practiced with a ball, just played keep away - the other teams would score like crazy.  that all ended when i introduced the ball into the keep away drills.  it was amazing to watch them pass the ball past the other teams who were so cocksure after trumping us a few weeks before.  it was a great experience and i couldn't believe the number of parents that wanted me to coach again the following year.  one of the coaches asked to be my assistant because it was clear my coaching style had an impact.


I've heard of this technique before...but I just don't get how it works. I coach my son's U9 (ages 6-8) league, and while they understand the concept of keepaway, I get maybe one kid every season who has the ball control abilities accurate enough to even kick in the direction he wants, much less wait and look for an open man.

Meanwhile, I get 2 or 3 kids who just kick at the ball in whatever direction they are facing, scoring goals for the other team.

I'm tempted to try it...but so much of my first month of practice is just spent trying to keep their feet down on throw ins, dribbling, and "don't just stand there and watch after you kick the damn ball" drills...I'm afraid to lose that time to keepaway.
 
2013-11-19 04:34:54 PM
Well that was disappointing...
 
2013-11-20 03:25:10 PM

Gonz: Go_Guins: Yea, kickball! I bet no one keeps score and everyone gets a trophy too.

That, or these are kids who are already being looked at as potential professional players.

Check out the jersey sponsors- Phantasialand (a fairly major amusement park) for one team, and LG for the other. That ain't Chico's Bail Bonds.

This isn't like having a local Little League team called the Yankees. It's more like the New York Yankees having a Little League team.


I saw that the video was titled farkoln U9.  If they are prospects of farkoln that would make a lot of sense.  I have seen European kids play the game and they aren't that much better to explain the difference of all kids on the pitch.
 
2013-11-20 08:52:12 PM
I think I'm more interested in the potential of the ref, because she might be worth a flop or two.
 
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