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(Do You Remember)   No, seriously. Andy Kaufman really was that weird   (doyouremember.com ) divider line
    More: Weird, death hoax, Jerry Springer, letterman  
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13702 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Nov 2013 at 9:37 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-11-19 09:41:12 AM  
The author has no fŮcking idea what he is talking about.
 
2013-11-19 09:44:10 AM  
Just not funny, just weird.
 
2013-11-19 09:44:25 AM  
Seems more clever than weird. Michael Jackson, however...
 
2013-11-19 09:51:09 AM  
You know what I find weird?  That little advertisement box that scrolls with the page, obscuring the article, so you can only read one or two lines at a time.

Nice farking design, dipshiats.

Speaking of Kaufman, I remember that bit with the wrestler.  That was so cringeworthy unfunny, I cannot believe they carried it on for so long.
 
2013-11-19 09:52:35 AM  

durbnpoisn: You know what I find weird?  That little advertisement box that scrolls with the page, obscuring the article, so you can only read one or two lines at a time.

Nice farking design, dipshiats.

Speaking of Kaufman, I remember that bit with the wrestler.  That was so cringeworthy unfunny, I cannot believe they carried it on for so long.


There was an "X"
 
2013-11-19 09:56:44 AM  

kneehall: There was an "X"


Yes. He interviewed her from a six-foot platform.
 
2013-11-19 09:58:25 AM  
He was the pre-internet troll and was great at using the media.

He was clever, he was witty and smart... funny not really in my eyes.
 
2013-11-19 10:00:24 AM  
What is it with all of the Andy K. links lately?

/And what is it with airplane food?
 
2013-11-19 10:00:39 AM  

kneehall: durbnpoisn: You know what I find weird?  That little advertisement box that scrolls with the page, obscuring the article, so you can only read one or two lines at a time.

Nice farking design, dipshiats.

Speaking of Kaufman, I remember that bit with the wrestler.  That was so cringeworthy unfunny, I cannot believe they carried it on for so long.

There was an "X"


I clicked the "X".  The ad went away and the box stayed.
 
2013-11-19 10:05:00 AM  
Andy Dick without drugs.
 
2013-11-19 10:08:13 AM  

kneehall: I remember that bit with the wrestler.


What made it "funny" was that he successfully trolled an entire city's worth of rasslin' fans who were stupid enough not to realize that they were actually being trolled by the wrestling promotion into believing that all of it was real in the first place.

Kaufman was more of a "performance artist" than anything.   He was the guy who pointed out the absurdity of many things a lot of people believed in, or took for granted by pointing a lens at it and seeing if you could actually figure it out.

Was he "funny" in a conventional sort of way?  Only in those few bits where he wanted to be.  Some of his more traditional stand-up bits were as funny as the top comics working the circuit back in his day.

It's difficult to explain to those who weren't around, or old enough to understand a lot of the underlying social context of the 70's when Kaufman rose to fame.  His performances were nearly a form of agitprop, except without an underlying political message.  Instead he substituted the notion of just how easy it was to get a rise out of people by getting them to buy into that what he was doing was serious, rather than just one long prank on them.  (A prank that couldn't exist without their willing participation by setting their brains on "idle" rather than thinking through the notion that what he was doing couldn't be real, just like they couldn't get through their brains that professional wrestling couldn't be real either, even when all the evidence was right there in front of their eyes.)

Was it funny to everyone?  No, but then again: does it have to be?
 
2013-11-19 10:14:31 AM  

mudpants: Just not funny, just weird.


yep.

Cult of personality. He was deemed "funny" by those who some thought were hip and it snowballed from there.
 
2013-11-19 10:26:23 AM  
Andy Kaufman was the beginning of the "anti-humor" trend that persists today. He was the precursor of the stuff that's supposed to be funny because it's not funny. People like Andy Kaufman are the reason we now have people like Tim and Eric and David Cross polluting our comedy eco-systems with their awfulness. And if for no other reason than that, I'm glad he's gone.
 
2013-11-19 10:31:58 AM  

stupiddream: What is it with all of the Andy K. links lately?

/And what is it with airplane food?


It drives a lot of traffic; people are in a big hurry to say how not funny he is.

/Those little bags of peanuts!
 
2013-11-19 10:33:04 AM  
Kaufman was brilliant at what he did. The joke often wasn't what he did, but the public reaction to what he did.

Some people find it hard to laugh at humanity's collective folly. Those people will never appreciate Kaufman.
 
2013-11-19 10:33:48 AM  
There was something a few days ago where somebody confirmed that he is still dead. . . I don't remember the details as the ensuing celebration of an already known fact was . . . intense.
 
2013-11-19 10:35:25 AM  

RevRaven: Tim and Eric


I dunno I don't really get most of what they do but they can make me laugh sometimes Kaufman just doesn't do anything at all for me.
 
2013-11-19 10:47:03 AM  
Hard to say how I feel about Kaufman. On one hand, his "it's not funny therefore it IS funny" followers drive me insane, yet his humor also doesn't appeal to the Dane Cook fanbase, who can't follow any of his acts due to their massive ADHD and need for someone to shout the jokes and wave their arms around.
 
2013-11-19 10:59:37 AM  

A Terrible Human: RevRaven: Tim and Eric

I dunno I don't really get most of what they do but they can make me laugh sometimes Kaufman just doesn't do anything at all for me.


That is because they're not at all the same thing.

Kaufman really was a "you had to be there" kind of act. If you're under 40-ish, it's just not going to resonate with you. And if you weren't in on the joke at the time (meaning, if you didn't realize early on that he was farking with you) then you probably got pissed off at his pranks and decided you hated him because in Andy's comedy, the joke was on you.
 
2013-11-19 11:01:28 AM  

RoxtarRyan: Hard to say how I feel about Kaufman. On one hand, his "it's not funny therefore it IS funny" followers drive me insane, yet his humor also doesn't appeal to the Dane Cook fanbase, who can't follow any of his acts due to their massive ADHD and need for someone to shout the jokes and wave their arms around.


Dane Cook, not only pathetically unfunny, has to throw in his underlying "persecuted Catholic" bullshiat into his act.
 
2013-11-19 11:09:12 AM  

lawboy87: kneehall: I remember that bit with the wrestler.

What made it "funny" was that he successfully trolled an entire city's worth of rasslin' fans who were stupid enough not to realize that they were actually being trolled by the wrestling promotion into believing that all of it was real in the first place.

Kaufman was more of a "performance artist" than anything.   He was the guy who pointed out the absurdity of many things a lot of people believed in, or took for granted by pointing a lens at it and seeing if you could actually figure it out.

Was he "funny" in a conventional sort of way?  Only in those few bits where he wanted to be.  Some of his more traditional stand-up bits were as funny as the top comics working the circuit back in his day.

It's difficult to explain to those who weren't around, or old enough to understand a lot of the underlying social context of the 70's when Kaufman rose to fame.  His performances were nearly a form of agitprop, except without an underlying political message.  Instead he substituted the notion of just how easy it was to get a rise out of people by getting them to buy into that what he was doing was serious, rather than just one long prank on them.  (A prank that couldn't exist without their willing participation by setting their brains on "idle" rather than thinking through the notion that what he was doing couldn't be real, just like they couldn't get through their brains that professional wrestling couldn't be real either, even when all the evidence was right there in front of their eyes.)

Was it funny to everyone?  No, but then again: does it have to be?


You bring up a good point.  AK was a troll 20 years before the Internet came about.  I really miss that guy.
 
2013-11-19 11:13:14 AM  

RevRaven: Andy Kaufman was the beginning of the "anti-humor" trend that persists today. He was the precursor of the stuff that's supposed to be funny because it's not funny. People like Andy Kaufman are the reason we now have people like Tim and Eric and David Cross polluting our comedy eco-systems with their awfulness. And if for no other reason than that, I'm glad he's gone.


Yeah -- he's probably up there, laughing at us now, the bastard.
 
2013-11-19 11:14:06 AM  
Is there any record of Andy admitting what his comedy was about, or did people build a mythos around a guy who was serious in the things he said and did?
 
2013-11-19 11:16:59 AM  
Back around 1980 (81, maybe?) I was a DJ in our small town. As it turned out, Andy Kaufman was friends with a local girl (how, no idea) and our paper even carried the story. Anyway, he had come to town to see her, and that evening his traveling buddy called the station and asked if they could come in. Being the night DJ, there was no one else in the station at the time, so I told him sure, what the hell.

Meeting him, he was a nice enough guy, ordinary, one might even say. (As opposed to someone like the "always on" Robin Williams) I got him on the air, and naturally, he threw out his challenge of beating any woman in wrestling, and he would do it right then, right at the station. We went on for a bit with some on-air banter (anti-banter?), and then I went back to the music, wondering how we were going to pull this off.

It didn't take long for the first call, but it wasn't from a woman. It was from a guy, and he was pissed at Kaufman. He was threatening to come down with his buddies and they were going to show Kaufman exactly what happens to guys who threaten to beat up women. I cut him off short, and hung up. Kaufman and his buddy were still sitting in the studio with me, and Kaufman had this scared look in his eyes. He began pacing back and forth, saying, "Are they really coming down? They wouldn't really come down, would they?"

He kept pacing, and his buddy finally said, "Andy, we should probably leave." However, neither of them would leave until I actually went outside and scoped out the surroundings. (No one was there, of course.)

They thanked me, and took off. The big talkers never showed.

Never saw him again after that.
 
2013-11-19 11:17:14 AM  

RoxtarRyan: On one hand, his "it's not funny therefore it IS funny" followers drive me insane


LOL I VICARIOUSLY TROL U

But yeah, willfully confusing "I'm annoying you" with "I'm funny" is a pretty dangerous thing, since thinking you're funny when you're not is  extremely annoying. That's more on his trufans than on Kaufman himself, though.

/loved him in that movie with Paul Giamatti and Courtney Love
 
2013-11-19 11:19:38 AM  
Funny or not, I think his 15 minutes are up.
 
2013-11-19 11:24:56 AM  

IC Stars: RevRaven: Andy Kaufman was the beginning of the "anti-humor" trend that persists today. He was the precursor of the stuff that's supposed to be funny because it's not funny. People like Andy Kaufman are the reason we now have people like Tim and Eric and David Cross polluting our comedy eco-systems with their awfulness. And if for no other reason than that, I'm glad he's gone.

Yeah -- he's probably up there, laughing at us now, the bastard.


I don't know who Tim and Eric are, and by the association, I probably don't want to, but David Cross is a good example of how much worse off Andy left the world of comedy.
 
2013-11-19 11:31:29 AM  
I'll admit it - I never "got him" - I'm old enough to remember him on Taxi during original airing, and I "got" his character, but nothing since then.

I understand what he was trying to do  -just never thought any of it was funny.
 
2013-11-19 11:35:58 AM  

ZeroCorpse: A Terrible Human: RevRaven: Tim and Eric

I dunno I don't really get most of what they do but they can make me laugh sometimes Kaufman just doesn't do anything at all for me.

That is because they're not at all the same thing.

Kaufman really was a "you had to be there" kind of act. If you're under 40-ish, it's just not going to resonate with you. And if you weren't in on the joke at the time (meaning, if you didn't realize early on that he was farking with you) then you probably got pissed off at his pranks and decided you hated him because in Andy's comedy, the joke was on you.


This. I'm old enough to remember seeing him on SNL singing the theme to Mighty Mouse, doing Elvis, etc.
 
2013-11-19 11:43:06 AM  

lawboy87: kneehall: I remember that bit with the wrestler.

What made it "funny" was that he successfully trolled an entire city's worth of rasslin' fans who were stupid enough not to realize that they were actually being trolled by the wrestling promotion into believing that all of it was real in the first place.

Kaufman was more of a "performance artist" than anything.   He was the guy who pointed out the absurdity of many things a lot of people believed in, or took for granted by pointing a lens at it and seeing if you could actually figure it out.

Was he "funny" in a conventional sort of way?  Only in those few bits where he wanted to be.  Some of his more traditional stand-up bits were as funny as the top comics working the circuit back in his day.

It's difficult to explain to those who weren't around, or old enough to understand a lot of the underlying social context of the 70's when Kaufman rose to fame.  His performances were nearly a form of agitprop, except without an underlying political message.  Instead he substituted the notion of just how easy it was to get a rise out of people by getting them to buy into that what he was doing was serious, rather than just one long prank on them.  (A prank that couldn't exist without their willing participation by setting their brains on "idle" rather than thinking through the notion that what he was doing couldn't be real, just like they couldn't get through their brains that professional wrestling couldn't be real either, even when all the evidence was right there in front of their eyes.)

Was it funny to everyone?  No, but then again: does it have to be?



Yes it does.
 
2013-11-19 11:44:31 AM  
All in all, I miss Bill Hicks considerably more.
 
2013-11-19 11:45:44 AM  

Marquis de Sod: ZeroCorpse: A Terrible Human: RevRaven: Tim and Eric

I dunno I don't really get most of what they do but they can make me laugh sometimes Kaufman just doesn't do anything at all for me.

That is because they're not at all the same thing.

Kaufman really was a "you had to be there" kind of act. If you're under 40-ish, it's just not going to resonate with you. And if you weren't in on the joke at the time (meaning, if you didn't realize early on that he was farking with you) then you probably got pissed off at his pranks and decided you hated him because in Andy's comedy, the joke was on you.

This. I'm old enough to remember seeing him on SNL singing the theme to Mighty Mouse, doing Elvis, etc.


I think everyone old enough to have seen the Kaufman arc lived somewhere on the line of eventually finding what he was doing to be bizarre and self indulgent. Some people thought that the first time they saw him do Mighty Mouse, and some didn't feel that way until he was wrestling women.

Styles of comedy happen in waves, and he was on the forefront of the sarcastic, self-aware, too hip for the room set. I also agree that he was ultimately more performance artist than comedian. He was there to get a reaction, and if he didn't piss you off, then he moved on to something else that might. That's not gonna resonate with most people, which is kind of the point.
 
2013-11-19 11:49:40 AM  

RevRaven: David Cross polluting our comedy eco-systems with their awfulness


Mr. Show was funny. But Cross can be somewhat of a pretentious douchebag, especially for someone who did two Chipmunk movies. 

RoxtarRyan: yet his humor also doesn't appeal to the Dane Cook fanbase, who can't follow any of his acts due to their massive ADHD and need for someone to shout the jokes and wave their arms around.


That sounds like people who say, "Well go watch Transformers 3" whenever someone else says they don't like a movie they like. Maybe something just sucks or people have different tastes.

/and no, Dane Cook isn't funny
 
2013-11-19 11:53:46 AM  

g4zilla: Back around 1980 (81, maybe?) I was a DJ in our small town. As it turned out, Andy Kaufman was friends with a local girl (how, no idea) and our paper even carried the story. Anyway, he had come to town to see her, and that evening his traveling buddy called the station and asked if they could come in. Being the night DJ, there was no one else in the station at the time, so I told him sure, what the hell.

Meeting him, he was a nice enough guy, ordinary, one might even say. (As opposed to someone like the "always on" Robin Williams) I got him on the air, and naturally, he threw out his challenge of beating any woman in wrestling, and he would do it right then, right at the station. We went on for a bit with some on-air banter (anti-banter?), and then I went back to the music, wondering how we were going to pull this off.

It didn't take long for the first call, but it wasn't from a woman. It was from a guy, and he was pissed at Kaufman. He was threatening to come down with his buddies and they were going to show Kaufman exactly what happens to guys who threaten to beat up women. I cut him off short, and hung up. Kaufman and his buddy were still sitting in the studio with me, and Kaufman had this scared look in his eyes. He began pacing back and forth, saying, "Are they really coming down? They wouldn't really come down, would they?"

He kept pacing, and his buddy finally said, "Andy, we should probably leave." However, neither of them would leave until I actually went outside and scoped out the surroundings. (No one was there, of course.)

They thanked me, and took off. The big talkers never showed.

Never saw him again after that.


I don't understand how someone can not think that's funny.
 
2013-11-19 12:01:34 PM  

Valiente: All in all, I miss Bill Hicks considerably more.


Oh, hell yes
 
2013-11-19 12:11:26 PM  

Clemkadidlefark: Valiente: All in all, I miss Bill Hicks considerably more.

Oh, hell yes


He wasn't exactly a comedian either. He did tell some jokes but a lot of his material was just true shiat that did't have a punchline. Like when he told all marketing people to kill themselves. That's it.

/remembers when Bret Butler had to give some Comedy Award to Carrot Top instead of the fellow nominee and recently dead Bill Hicks and she looked like she wanted to stab him in the throat
 
2013-11-19 12:33:12 PM  

RevRaven: Andy Kaufman was the beginning of the "anti-humor" trend that persists today. He was the precursor of the stuff that's supposed to be funny because it's not funny. People like Andy Kaufman are the reason we now have people like Tim and Eric and David Cross polluting our comedy eco-systems with their awfulness. And if for no other reason than that, I'm glad he's gone.


Now, come on, Mr. Show was hilarious. So was the Rickey Henderson bit from Shut Up You F*cking Baby.

As far as Kaufman goes, I don't really get it. He was basically trolling the whole world, but he's the only one who was ever in on the joke, at least until Jim Carrey made that movie. Being intentionally unlikeable for the sole purpose of attracting headlines sounds too much like Ann Coulter to me.
 
2013-11-19 12:44:37 PM  
Overrated.
 
2013-11-19 01:18:31 PM  
I don't understand all the "you had to be there" sentiment.

He got paid to do it and it was funny to him. It didn't matter if it was funny to you. Often, it was an exercise in how far he could take it. The difference between his bits and trolling these days is the level of sophistication.
 
2013-11-19 01:36:43 PM  
I miss Carlin.
 
2013-11-19 01:43:31 PM  
Kaufman was a farking genius.  Watching him has, to me, always invoked tremendous anticipation.  That bit where he was eating ice cream was amazing.  The breakdown in the skit comedy bit was also.  His angle was that he was going to act in a manner other than what you are accustomed to in the situation.  I've been a fan of Kaufman since before he died the first time.
 
2013-11-19 01:59:40 PM  

g4zilla: Back around 1980 (81, maybe?) I was a DJ in our small town. As it turned out, Andy Kaufman was friends with a local girl (how, no idea) and our paper even carried the story. Anyway, he had come to town to see her, and that evening his traveling buddy called the station and asked if they could come in. Being the night DJ, there was no one else in the station at the time, so I told him sure, what the hell.

Meeting him, he was a nice enough guy, ordinary, one might even say. (As opposed to someone like the "always on" Robin Williams) I got him on the air, and naturally, he threw out his challenge of beating any woman in wrestling, and he would do it right then, right at the station. We went on for a bit with some on-air banter (anti-banter?), and then I went back to the music, wondering how we were going to pull this off.

It didn't take long for the first call, but it wasn't from a woman. It was from a guy, and he was pissed at Kaufman. He was threatening to come down with his buddies and they were going to show Kaufman exactly what happens to guys who threaten to beat up women. I cut him off short, and hung up. Kaufman and his buddy were still sitting in the studio with me, and Kaufman had this scared look in his eyes. He began pacing back and forth, saying, "Are they really coming down? They wouldn't really come down, would they?"

He kept pacing, and his buddy finally said, "Andy, we should probably leave." However, neither of them would leave until I actually went outside and scoped out the surroundings. (No one was there, of course.)

They thanked me, and took off. The big talkers never showed.

Never saw him again after that.


Knowing his bits I wouldn't be surprised at all if he was behind the call.  I guess that's his thing though, you never know.

Looking through the cynical eyes of this era all of his bits look silly but I can imagine at the time it looked a lot more genuine since people hadn't seen a million scripted situations like that.
 
2013-11-19 03:09:30 PM  
I'll add my 2 cents.  I watched all the clips in that link and enjoyed them, but I also clicked on a few more leading me to his bit about eating ice cream on stage.  Trollerific!  He just ate ice cream on stage and for some reason people laughed.  It wasn't really funny though.

I liked it much better when he took the audience out for milk and cookies.  A lot of his stuff was hilarious and he wasn't afraid to try the outrageous, but some of his stuff just falls flat on its face.
 
2013-11-19 04:02:52 PM  

RevRaven: Andy Kaufman was the beginning of the "anti-humor" trend that persists today. He was the precursor of the stuff that's supposed to be funny because it's not funny. People like Andy Kaufman are the reason we now have people like Tim and Eric and David Cross polluting our comedy eco-systems with their awfulness. And if for no other reason than that, I'm glad he's gone.


img.fark.net

I'll give you a 1/10 for the effort, but you lose a lot of points for lambasting Tim & Eric and David Cross. I know both of our comments are going to fall under personal tastes ("that's just like, your opinion man"), but I don't get how or why comedy has to be such a straightforward joke>punchline for everyone. I guess that's why Dane Cook and Larry the Cable Guy are so popular, because they appeal to the lowest common denominator.

Now if you'll excuse me, I have some Andy Kaufman videos to watch.
 
2013-11-19 04:44:09 PM  
I-bid-da?

Yak-ta-beh?
 
2013-11-19 08:15:01 PM  
I just recently watched the entire Carnegie Hall special on YouTube.  I recommend it to any Kaufman fan.
 
2013-11-19 08:26:58 PM  
You know, if we're going to start talking about comic geniuses we lost in their prime, somebody has got to mention this towering giant:


www.carolines.com
 
2013-11-19 10:10:16 PM  
Andy Kaufman is one of those guys who, if he were still alive today, probably wouldn't be a big deal at all.

Death has added to his mystique, talent, etc.
 
2013-11-20 01:29:17 AM  
Wow, that show sucked.
 
2013-11-20 01:31:42 AM  

Big_Doofus: Andy Kaufman is one of those guys who, if he were still alive today, probably wouldn't be a big deal at all.

Death has added to his mystique, talent, etc.


Or, he could be blowing our minds in completely new ways.  Sadly, we'll never know.

In my opinion, he drew heavily from the Larry Fine school of comedy.  (That's Larry of the Three Stooges.)  While Curly, Moe, Shemp and/or Curly Joe had their physical comedy, Larry was out there in his own surreal way.  I always saw Andy as extending that to the modern era, only breaking the 4th wall while doing it.

I've always felt we lost an unsung genius when we lost Andy.
 
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