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(Gawker)   Wal-Mart would like you to donate food to needy families who can't afford a traditional Thanksgiving dinner. Namely, their own employees   (gawker.com) divider line 49
    More: Sad, Thanksgiving, Thanksgiving dinner, United Food, Walton family, Walmart  
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49 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-11-18 08:21:06 PM
This looks bad... for Fark.
 
2013-11-18 08:21:52 PM
That is absolutely disgusting such a large company would do that.
 
2013-11-18 08:22:07 PM
Saw an interesting vid on live leak about Wal mart, and despite the whole corporate "we care, and give our employees a good wage..blah blah rhetoric ", you see what really happens. Low wages, lawsuits for stolen / non paid overtime, working overtime by force with no pay as compensation, and the list goes on. I'm sure its on youtube if you look.
 
2013-11-18 08:22:48 PM

i301.photobucket.com

Repeat parrot likes repeat thread!

 
2013-11-18 08:22:59 PM
I would make a snarky remark, but I haven't celebrated since I have no family.
 
d23 [TotalFark]
2013-11-18 08:23:16 PM
 
2013-11-18 08:24:07 PM
Are the mods asleep?  This was already posted earlier today.

But what I really want  to know is, are the mods asleep?  Because this was already posted earlier today.
 
2013-11-18 08:24:28 PM
When I worked for Anheuser-Busch, every employee, even the lowly merchandisers on the bottom of the wage ladder and working part time, were given a turkey for Thanksgiving and a ham or turkey for Christmas.  I'm not sure if that changed post InBev, but it was the case at least up until that sale.  I wish more companies would do this when they have working class employees.  It helps tremendously
 
d23 [TotalFark]
2013-11-18 08:24:39 PM
oh and since I have this chance again,

fark you waltons all the way back to john-boy's walton's mountain.
 
d23 [TotalFark]
2013-11-18 08:25:35 PM

bhcompy: When I worked for Anheuser-Busch, every employee, even the lowly merchandisers on the bottom of the wage ladder and working part time, were given a turkey for Thanksgiving and a ham or turkey for Christmas.  I'm not sure if that changed post InBev, but it was the case at least up until that sale.  I wish more companies would do this when they have working class employees.  It helps tremendously


screw you taker!  Those turkies are enough to pay for 1/3 of the CEO's next car!
 
2013-11-18 08:25:39 PM
So now Walmart employees receive socialized healthcare -and- socialized foodcare. They don't sound very bootstrappy.
 
2013-11-18 08:26:06 PM
ah! I'm on fire!

it burns! it burns!
 
2013-11-18 08:26:10 PM
re-pete
 
2013-11-18 08:26:45 PM
Wow, that's the same thing they did this year!
 
2013-11-18 08:28:16 PM

d23: bhcompy: When I worked for Anheuser-Busch, every employee, even the lowly merchandisers on the bottom of the wage ladder and working part time, were given a turkey for Thanksgiving and a ham or turkey for Christmas.  I'm not sure if that changed post InBev, but it was the case at least up until that sale.  I wish more companies would do this when they have working class employees.  It helps tremendously

screw you taker!  Those turkies are enough to pay for 1/3 of the CEO's next car!


That's the general shareholder point of view, I imagine.  Pity that shareholders value goodwill so little, considering it is on the balance sheet.

Then again, that's why I typically try to find work with private business.
 
2013-11-18 08:28:25 PM
Let me get this straight.

1. Walmart asks you to donate food to needy families.
2. You buy the food at Walmart who has driven the price down so far that the manufacturer makes no profit and manufactures in China.
3. PROFIT (for Walmart)

Instead Walmart could just use their crazy insanely low negotiated supplier prices to get way more food and give it to poor people. I get that Walmart is publicly owned and can't just give their profit away to needy people, but they are spending money on this campaign, why not just buy food with the money and give it to people? Will this really work better?
 
2013-11-18 08:28:46 PM
quick, someone post a bunch of boobie pictures, the mods are asleep!!!
 
2013-11-18 08:29:13 PM

AloysiusSnuffleupagus: Are the mods asleep?  This was already posted earlier today.

But what I really want  to know is, are the mods asleep?  Because this was already posted earlier today.


www.fanboy.com
 
2013-11-18 08:29:56 PM
Much work remains to be done with this experiment called 'civilization'.
 
2013-11-18 08:30:42 PM
img.photobucket.com
 
2013-11-18 08:31:00 PM
Likei said earlier,  they should give them all the McDonalds leftovers
 
2013-11-18 08:31:36 PM
Old shiat - no one cares. Really.
 
2013-11-18 08:31:40 PM
I don't always point out repeat threads.  But when I do, I prefer they're posted within hours of each other.
 
2013-11-18 08:31:53 PM
img.photobucket.com
 
d23 [TotalFark]
2013-11-18 08:32:35 PM
livedoor.blogimg.jp
 
2013-11-18 08:33:24 PM

Notabunny: [img.photobucket.com image 600x471]


What am I looking at?!
 
2013-11-18 08:33:44 PM
I'm not sure what's going on in here.
 
2013-11-18 08:34:18 PM
img.photobucket.com
 
2013-11-18 08:34:39 PM
We all hear so very much about how people need to be bootstrappy and support themselves. Since corporations are people, my friends, I propose the following:

Okay, we eliminate welfare and food stamps...

In exchange for a minimum wage high enough that companies which employ minimum wage workers are paying for their workers, rather than me subsidizing them by making up the difference between what they're currently paid and enough to live.

Deal?
 
2013-11-18 08:34:49 PM
Pete und Repete bist in ein boot.

Pete aus gefallen

Wie übrig?
 
2013-11-18 08:34:56 PM

star_topology: I'm not sure what's going on in here.


mods are asleep. post ponies.
 
d23 [TotalFark]
2013-11-18 08:35:03 PM
tawny kitaen? oh no..

media.windingroad.com
 
d23 [TotalFark]
2013-11-18 08:36:09 PM
i2.listal.com
 
2013-11-18 08:36:17 PM
i.imgur.com
 
TWX
2013-11-18 08:36:28 PM

viscountalpha: Notabunny: [img.photobucket.com image 600x471]

What am I looking at?!


A screencap from a Victoria Principal movie?

/just a guess
//but there's a fairly statistically significant chance
 
2013-11-18 08:36:58 PM

spidermilk: Let me get this straight.

1. Walmart asks you to donate food to needy families.
2. You buy the food at Walmart who has driven the price down so far that the manufacturer makes no profit and manufactures in China.
3. PROFIT (for Walmart)


Worse than that. The meal might look like a traditional Thanksgiving feast, but the needy families are hungry again an hour later.
 
2013-11-18 08:37:04 PM
img.photobucket.com
 
2013-11-18 08:37:47 PM

bhcompy: d23: bhcompy: When I worked for Anheuser-Busch, every employee, even the lowly merchandisers on the bottom of the wage ladder and working part time, were given a turkey for Thanksgiving and a ham or turkey for Christmas.  I'm not sure if that changed post InBev, but it was the case at least up until that sale.  I wish more companies would do this when they have working class employees.  It helps tremendously

screw you taker!  Those turkies are enough to pay for 1/3 of the CEO's next car!

That's the general shareholder point of view, I imagine.  Pity that shareholders value goodwill so little, considering it is on the balance sheet.

Then again, that's why I typically try to find work with private business.



I don't know.  If you gathered every shareholder into a big room and had them vote on whether or not to pay employees a reasonable wage, would they vote against it even if meant uncertainty in near-term profits?  Certainly Walmart would still have a profit, just perhaps not as much for a short period of time.

What if the employees were also shareholders or something like it?  In Germany this is quite common.  It's not quite like a union where the union and management tend to be in open conflict with their goals, but rather what's good for the employees is good for the company, and vice versa.
 
2013-11-18 08:38:10 PM

Notabunny: star_topology: I'm not sure what's going on in here.

mods are asleep. post ponies.


Oh I get it, we (you guys) spam the thread with "inappropriate" posts until the dupe thread (this one) is taken down?
 
2013-11-18 08:38:34 PM
Capitalism without human morality is nothing more than exploitation. This leads me to believe the owners of Walmart are Lizard people.
 
2013-11-18 08:40:11 PM

TWX: viscountalpha: Notabunny: [img.photobucket.com image 600x471]

What am I looking at?!

A screencap from a Victoria Principal movie?

/just a guess
//but there's a fairly statistically significant chance


Tawny Kitaen in The Perils of Gwendoline in the Land of the Yik Yak. Possible the finest movie ever made.
 
2013-11-18 08:41:21 PM

star_topology: Notabunny: star_topology: I'm not sure what's going on in here.

mods are asleep. post ponies.

Oh I get it, we (you guys) spam the thread with "inappropriate" posts until the dupe thread (this one) is taken down?


And because I am a 10 years old

img.photobucket.com
 
d23 [TotalFark]
2013-11-18 08:41:24 PM

TheDirtyNacho: I don't know. If you gathered every shareholder into a big room and had them vote on whether or not to pay employees a reasonable wage, would they vote against it even if meant uncertainty in near-term profits? Certainly Walmart would still have a profit, just perhaps not as much for a short period of time.

What if the employees were also shareholders or something like it? In Germany this is quite common. It's not quite like a union where the union and management tend to be in open conflict with their goals, but rather what's good for the employees is good for the company, and vice versa.


Everyday shareholders have NO sway in corporate america.  It's one of the biggest myths in the world right now.  The biggest shareholders are board members and CEOs.

I am anti-corporate, but I don't think the shareholder system is the problem.  The problem is the executive "class" that the country has right now.  As a shareholder I would stand up and say this should be done even if it costs the a bit of money.  But just try to stand up at a shareholders meeting of ANY company and be heard.  I dare ya.
 
2013-11-18 08:43:26 PM
img.photobucket.com
 
2013-11-18 08:43:32 PM

Amish Tech Support: Capitalism without human morality is nothing more than exploitation. This leads me to believe the owners of Walmart are Lizard people.


Give Lizard People a break. You'd be angry too if an asteroid wiped out your capital city of Chicxulub.

/stupid upstart mammals. All this "I have fur! I laugh at cold weather!" Bah!
 
2013-11-18 08:46:48 PM
img.photobucket.com
 
2013-11-18 08:46:52 PM

TheDirtyNacho: bhcompy: d23: bhcompy: When I worked for Anheuser-Busch, every employee, even the lowly merchandisers on the bottom of the wage ladder and working part time, were given a turkey for Thanksgiving and a ham or turkey for Christmas.  I'm not sure if that changed post InBev, but it was the case at least up until that sale.  I wish more companies would do this when they have working class employees.  It helps tremendously

screw you taker!  Those turkies are enough to pay for 1/3 of the CEO's next car!

That's the general shareholder point of view, I imagine.  Pity that shareholders value goodwill so little, considering it is on the balance sheet.

Then again, that's why I typically try to find work with private business.


I don't know.  If you gathered every shareholder into a big room and had them vote on whether or not to pay employees a reasonable wage, would they vote against it even if meant uncertainty in near-term profits?  Certainly Walmart would still have a profit, just perhaps not as much for a short period of time.

What if the employees were also shareholders or something like it?  In Germany this is quite common.  It's not quite like a union where the union and management tend to be in open conflict with their goals, but rather what's good for the employees is good for the company, and vice versa.


Part of the problem is that the shareholders aren't all in a big room.  Instead there are a few dozen fund managers across the world and hundreds of thousands/millions of little individuals across the world, not in the same room, who don't see what's right in front of them because they're in their own little islands trying to make 50 cents more for their retirement.

And then you have guys like Carl Icahn who buy significant but small shares in companies(like 5% stakes) but stirring shiat up in the news about hostile takeovers and the stocks go ballistic.

Workers cooperatives are great, but Walmart isn't one of them, and neither are most listed companies(rather than public, they're private, but owned by the workers instead of a proprietor).

Tree Top (apple juice and sauce) is probably the most visible cooperative I can think of in the States
 
2013-11-18 08:47:41 PM

d23: Everyday shareholders have NO sway in corporate america. It's one of the biggest myths in the world right now. The biggest shareholders are board members and CEOs.

I am anti-corporate, but I don't think the shareholder system is the problem. The problem is the executive "class" that the country has right now. As a shareholder I would stand up and say this should be done even if it costs the a bit of money. But just try to stand up at a shareholders meeting of ANY company and be heard. I dare ya.


Hello non-voting shares!
 
2013-11-18 09:50:24 PM

viscountalpha: Notabunny: [img.photobucket.com image 600x471]

What am I looking at?!


One of the greatest b-movies of all time:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Perils_of_Gwendoline_in_the_Land_of _t he_Yik-Yak
 
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