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(Science Daily)   Long term oral contraceptive users are more likely to get something in their eye   (sciencedaily.com) divider line 23
    More: Interesting, pills, risk profiles, glaucoma, eye exams, uc san francisco, Duke University School of Medicine, American Academy of Ophthalmology  
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4502 clicks; posted to Geek » on 18 Nov 2013 at 3:13 PM (33 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



23 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-11-18 03:15:05 PM
Love?
 
2013-11-18 03:20:56 PM
Several years ago I read that women on the pill blink a lot more often. Wonder if there's a connection.
 
2013-11-18 03:26:54 PM
Luckily they can just smoke a j
 
2013-11-18 03:39:59 PM

Fano: Luckily they can just smoke a j


Most can't do so legally.
 
2013-11-18 03:40:49 PM
I really wish medical science articles in the popular press would put "double the risk" type stats in context. I mean Glaucoma is relatively common but in those under 50 it is only 0.5% incidence in the general population. 10% of the population over 80. And that is pill/non-pill users combined although obviously most of those users are in the current, under-50 cohort.
 
2013-11-18 03:41:11 PM
I suspect that the negative health affects of 'the pill' are greatly under-emphasized because, for large groups, it's way better to have an increased risk of x,y,z and avoid pregnancy almost all of the time.
 
2013-11-18 04:00:26 PM
It's odd to me, as a man, that more women don't choose to get an IUD instead of hormonal birth control, particularly now as they're free if you have health insurance.
 
2013-11-18 04:05:06 PM
More likely to get something in their eye? Maybe they don't need the contraceptives in the first place.
 
2013-11-18 04:06:14 PM

jxb465: More likely to get something in their eye? Maybe they don't need the contraceptives in the first place.


<ThatsTheJoke.jpg>
 
2013-11-18 04:20:04 PM
I'm not an expert, but I have heard that when you get it in your eyes, it burns.

/No, I don't want to try it.
 
2013-11-18 04:26:09 PM
semen has prostaglandins in it, so potentially direct application may lower IOP
 
2013-11-18 04:27:13 PM

Andric: jxb465: More likely to get something in their eye? Maybe they don't need the contraceptives in the first place.

<ThatsTheJoke.jpg>


Really?
 
2013-11-18 04:40:45 PM

meanmutton: It's odd to me, as a man, that more women don't choose to get an IUD instead of hormonal birth control, particularly now as they're free if you have health insurance.


If you've never had a child, some practitioners won't give you one, because there's a chance that a) it won't fit, b) your cervix won't open up enough to allow it in, and/or c) a slightly higher chance of expulsion or other complications. I've heard that insertion is also more painful for women who've never been pregnant, and providers are loath to provide one unless you promise that the pain won't get to you and that you won't be back in under a month to have it out. I pretty much had to beg for mine, but the likelihood that I'd go back to the pill at this point is negligible. I think a lot of it comes down to lack of knowledge, though. I didn't find out about it until I went looking because I don't get along with the pill. Well that and some young women are afraid of the pain just after insertion. I do recommend it any time the subject of birth control comes up, though.
 
2013-11-18 04:42:11 PM

meanmutton: It's odd to me, as a man, that more women don't choose to get an IUD instead of hormonal birth control, particularly now as they're free if you have health insurance.


It's odd to you that women wouldn't want something jammed into their uterus? Having the IUD inserted is a painful, invasive procedure. Having it removed can be worse.
 
2013-11-18 04:57:04 PM
Although the survey mentioned they were fromAmerican Academy of Ophthalmology in New Orleans, the article failed to mention the demographics of the survey other then age of individuals over 40 that were asked questions.  Were the subjects women who had already had been diagnosed with glaucoma and just happened to use oral contraceptives? And of course other info that could be relevant was also not mentioned. So I don't entirely believe it as fact.

Being this is from New Orleans and there is and with its current political environment, I would not be surprised that there could be more behind this survey being used by an anti contraceptive group or grand given by one as a scare tactic.
 
2013-11-18 04:59:36 PM
So since I smoked the entire time I was on bc,more than 3 years,I'm probably going to go blind extra quick?
 
2013-11-18 05:08:59 PM

A Terrible Human: So since I smoked the entire time I was on bc,more than 3 years,I'm probably going to go blind extra quick?


Bros ex wife had an aneurism. BC for probably 15 + years without a break, smoked the whole time including ganja.
May have been related.
 
2013-11-18 05:11:04 PM

Luthien's Tempest: meanmutton: It's odd to me, as a man, that more women don't choose to get an IUD instead of hormonal birth control, particularly now as they're free if you have health insurance.

If you've never had a child, some practitioners won't give you one, because there's a chance that a) it won't fit, b) your cervix won't open up enough to allow it in, and/or c) a slightly higher chance of expulsion or other complications. I've heard that insertion is also more painful for women who've never been pregnant, and providers are loath to provide one unless you promise that the pain won't get to you and that you won't be back in under a month to have it out. I pretty much had to beg for mine, but the likelihood that I'd go back to the pill at this point is negligible. I think a lot of it comes down to lack of knowledge, though. I didn't find out about it until I went looking because I don't get along with the pill. Well that and some young women are afraid of the pain just after insertion. I do recommend it any time the subject of birth control comes up, though.


I loved mine until it got lost in my uterus and had to be removed, quite painfully.
 
2013-11-18 05:11:34 PM

Luthien's Tempest: meanmutton: It's odd to me, as a man, that more women don't choose to get an IUD instead of hormonal birth control, particularly now as they're free if you have health insurance.

If you've never had a child, some practitioners won't give you one, because there's a chance that a) it won't fit, b) your cervix won't open up enough to allow it in, and/or c) a slightly higher chance of expulsion or other complications. I've heard that insertion is also more painful for women who've never been pregnant, and providers are loath to provide one unless you promise that the pain won't get to you and that you won't be back in under a month to have it out. I pretty much had to beg for mine, but the likelihood that I'd go back to the pill at this point is negligible. I think a lot of it comes down to lack of knowledge, though. I didn't find out about it until I went looking because I don't get along with the pill. Well that and some young women are afraid of the pain just after insertion. I do recommend it any time the subject of birth control comes up, though.


Plus, there's less of a chance of having a stroke, I believe?

/I'm kiiindaaaa biased against the pill after a generic ofYaz nearly killed my then-girlfriend, now-wife. She's fine now, though!
 
2013-11-18 05:48:49 PM

SundaesChild: I loved mine until it got lost in my uterus and had to be removed, quite painfully.


Eeeek! I'd probably still feel I came out ahead since the pill worsened my depression (and I'm enjoying the no menstrual cycle thing), but I could see how that would change many people's opinions *shudder*

I found it odd that going into it, I was worried about what might happen in the future with things going wrong, but the NP who inserted mine was infinitely more worried about the insertion pain and me wanting it out soon after having it inserted. Two years in, though, and so far, so good.
 
2013-11-18 07:26:12 PM

Luthien's Tempest: SundaesChild: I loved mine until it got lost in my uterus and had to be removed, quite painfully.

Eeeek! I'd probably still feel I came out ahead since the pill worsened my depression (and I'm enjoying the no menstrual cycle thing), but I could see how that would change many people's opinions *shudder*

I found it odd that going into it, I was worried about what might happen in the future with things going wrong, but the NP who inserted mine was infinitely more worried about the insertion pain and me wanting it out soon after having it inserted. Two years in, though, and so far, so good.


Interesting observations. The guy I went to (keep in mind this was Canada, because I got the Mirena before it was approved in the US) was only concerned that I knew that it didn't prevent STDs. Now, the pain, the insertion pain was pain I didn't think was possible. The only comparison I have is blowing out my knee (and yeah, about equal, but the recovery from the IUD was much quicker, and didn't involved three months of physical therapy). Maybe getting kicked in the balls would be the same? Not sure, you'd have to ask a football player I guess. Removal pain wasn't bad; worse was actually the one time I had them check because I couldn't feel the strings. The nurse took a sound and tapped the bottom of the IUD. When I sat up straight on the bed, she was like, "Yup, still there!"

/would have gotten another one, but California quit paying for them for a time and I would have had to shell out $700
 
2013-11-18 10:05:45 PM
How long before this is debunked as sponsored right-wing tomfoolery?
 
2013-11-19 10:54:05 AM
I'd rather be blind that get pregnant.

/2 years on the first pill brand I tried and not pregnant yet.
/Not blind either.
 
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