If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(RealClear)   Deep-sea diver attempting world record without oxygen tank or fins dies, well, predictably   (realclear.com) divider line 121
    More: Sad, International Association of Educators  
•       •       •

9570 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Nov 2013 at 2:20 PM (36 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



121 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-11-18 12:15:16 PM
'Doing What He Loved,' Deep-Sea Diver Dies After Record Bid


At least he died doing what he loved: grasping hopelessly at life after extreme pressure crushed his lungs into a fine paste and took away all his reasoning and motor skills. Oh, to be young and free.
 
2013-11-18 12:19:38 PM
Drowning is a sport now?
 
2013-11-18 12:31:55 PM

Saborlas: Drowning is a sport now?


I prefer synchronized drowning.
 
2013-11-18 12:34:04 PM
most elaborate suicide plot ever?
 
2013-11-18 12:48:23 PM
Ive been snorkeling and scuba diving a few times, how is this even physically possible? Wouldnt the pressure cause serious problems? I guess you can train and get your body used to it.
 
2013-11-18 12:55:33 PM

www.problogger.net

 
2013-11-18 12:55:58 PM
The first thing you are taught in scuba diving is to never hold your breath. The second thing is to always ascend slowly.
 
2013-11-18 01:13:38 PM

vernonFL: The first thing you are taught in scuba diving is to never hold your breath. The second thing is to always ascend slowly.


This is free-diving, ie., holding your breath and seeing how deep you can go.  The normal cautions you find in SCUBA diving don't really apply because you aren't forcing gasses into your bloodstream.
 
2013-11-18 01:14:47 PM

vernonFL: Wouldnt the pressure cause serious problems?


Apparently.
 
2013-11-18 01:16:09 PM

vernonFL: Ive been snorkeling and scuba diving a few times, how is this even physically possible? Wouldnt the pressure cause serious problems? I guess you can train and get your body used to it.


Apparently, you can.  The "Dynamic weight/with fins" free-diving record is 281 meters.  That's just about 900 feet.
 
2013-11-18 01:22:32 PM

dittybopper: vernonFL: Ive been snorkeling and scuba diving a few times, how is this even physically possible? Wouldnt the pressure cause serious problems? I guess you can train and get your body used to it.

Apparently, you can.  The "Dynamic weight/with fins" free-diving record is 281 meters.  That's just about 900 feet.


Correction:  Depth record is 214 meters, which is about 685 feet, still nothing to sneeze at.
 
2013-11-18 01:25:36 PM
That's sad.  I'll never listen to Petty's Freediving the same way ever again.
 
2013-11-18 01:26:23 PM

I_Am_Weasel: That's sad.  I'll never listen to Petty's Freediving the same way ever again.


Dude, that song is about going commando:  'Cause I'm free, free ballin'....
 
2013-11-18 01:31:54 PM
Free diving is ridiculously thrilling, although I've never come close to this level of diving nor even breath holding.  But like all things in the water and/or thrilling, there are significant risks associated with it.

vernonFL: The first thing you are taught in scuba diving is to never hold your breath. The second thing is to always ascend slowly.


Scuba has its own litany of serious, easy-to-achieve, deadly side effects, but it is a different ball game as Dittybopper pointed out.

/former Navy diver
 
2013-11-18 01:36:54 PM
I guess if you dont have any air in your lungs, the pressure changes wouldnt cause them to explode.

It must be possible to dive down 300 feet ann come up again because people have done it, but i don't see how.
 
2013-11-18 01:55:05 PM

vernonFL: I guess if you dont have any air in your lungs, the pressure changes wouldnt cause them to explode.

It must be possible to dive down 300 feet ann come up again because people have done it, but i don't see how.


Of course not, because it's below the surface.

Much of it appears to be training, along with native ability.  It's amazing what the human body can do.
 
2013-11-18 02:03:43 PM
"Nobody could do what he did under the water," said Paul Mevoli, 55, a dentist in St. Petersburg, Fla

What, die?
 
2013-11-18 02:09:20 PM
And my ears hurt just swimming to the bottom of a pool.
 
2013-11-18 02:14:01 PM
Why the sad tag? He did something that carries a very serious risk. Just like those skydivers who are now throwing their parachutes out before and diving after them.
 
2013-11-18 02:21:57 PM
Did anyone else find themselves taking an extra deep breath just now?
 
2013-11-18 02:22:49 PM

dittybopper: dittybopper: vernonFL: Ive been snorkeling and scuba diving a few times, how is this even physically possible? Wouldnt the pressure cause serious problems? I guess you can train and get your body used to it.

Apparently, you can.  The "Dynamic weight/with fins" free-diving record is 281 meters.  That's just about 900 feet.

Correction:  Depth record is 214 meters, which is about 685 feet, still nothing to sneeze at.


You should definitely not sneeze at 685 feet deep.
 
2013-11-18 02:24:20 PM
"Nobody could do what he did under the water," said Paul Mevoli, 55, a dentist in St. Petersburg, Fla.

I'm pretty sure I could drown if I really set my mind to it.
 
2013-11-18 02:25:59 PM
www.fr2day.com

One of these guys?
 
2013-11-18 02:26:22 PM

dittybopper: vernonFL: The first thing you are taught in scuba diving is to never hold your breath. The second thing is to always ascend slowly.

This is free-diving, ie., holding your breath and seeing how deep you can go.  The normal cautions you find in SCUBA diving don't really apply because you aren't forcing gasses into your bloodstream.


You're also only at depth for a nanosecond, so the nitrogen doesn't have a chance to dissapate into your bloodstream - which is what causes the bends.
 
2013-11-18 02:26:34 PM
I want to die doing what I love: Repeatedly thrusting a knife into my abdomen.

And then when it kills me, I want the story posted here with a "sad" tag.
 
2013-11-18 02:26:46 PM

NutWrench: "Nobody could do what he did under the water," said Paul Mevoli, 55, a dentist in St. Petersburg, Fla.

I'm pretty sure I could drown if I really set my mind to it.


Yeah, but can you drown with style?
 
2013-11-18 02:26:52 PM

scottydoesntknow: Why the sad tag? He did something that carries a very serious risk. Just like those skydivers who are now throwing their parachutes out before and diving after them.


Who the hell does that? More than once, anyway.
 
2013-11-18 02:27:58 PM
"You were right."
"I was right about what?"
"It is much better down there. It's a better place."
 
2013-11-18 02:28:41 PM
He died doing what he loved, drowning. Kind of strange, but everyone has a habit that is probably bad for them.

//Mine is breathing like I'm addicted to oxygen. I haven't been able to find a counseling group yet.
 
2013-11-18 02:29:16 PM

FrancoFile: [www.fr2day.com image 600x400]

One of these guys?


/tips hat
 
2013-11-18 02:30:06 PM
He should have taken the Arthur Dent approach to flying, and simply forget to drown.
 
2013-11-18 02:30:48 PM

impaler: And my ears hurt just swimming to the bottom of a pool.


Ditto, and that's just 13 feet. Can't even begin to imagine what 685 feet deep would feel like, even in one of those giant Big Daddy type suits.
 
2013-11-18 02:31:35 PM
He did not sea that coming.
 
GBB [TotalFark]
2013-11-18 02:33:30 PM
The entire point of these dare-devil stunts is to do something risky and come out OK.  When someone does it, there is much celebration.  When someone dies doing it, it's not sad, it's expected.

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-11-18 02:33:56 PM

labman: scottydoesntknow: Why the sad tag? He did something that carries a very serious risk. Just like those skydivers who are now throwing their parachutes out before and diving after them.

Who the hell does that? More than once, anyway.


Banzai Skydiving
 
2013-11-18 02:34:12 PM
We will name a buoy after him.
 
2013-11-18 02:34:23 PM
"Nobody could do what he did under the water," said Paul Mevoli, 55, a dentist in St. Petersburg, Fla.


Not even him apparently...
 
2013-11-18 02:34:34 PM

scottydoesntknow: Why the sad tag? He did something that carries a very serious risk. Just like those skydivers who are now throwing their parachutes out before and diving after them.


O_o

seriously? Dayum...
 
2013-11-18 02:37:03 PM
Did he win, or do they have some stupid rule that you have to still be alive to claim a prize?
 
2013-11-18 02:39:27 PM

Saborlas: Drowning is a sport now?


Why not, people think turning left at 200mph is a sport.
 
2013-11-18 02:40:19 PM
shiat. Should've refreshed.

"The longest time ever recorded between skydiver and parachute leaving the plane and linking up is 50 seconds"

Christ, that would be the longest 50 seconds ever.

Back on topic, this dude dying got me thinking about Bushman's Hole. Somebody's always going to push the envelope.
 
2013-11-18 02:41:21 PM
Well, he's now trying for the world's record without breathing, and he's got a good start.
eddyphillips.blog.com
 
2013-11-18 02:42:11 PM
<sigh>  For the umpteenth time, SCUBA divers do not use "oxygen" tanks.  For most divers, it's air.  Just plain old air.  As a matter of fact, dumbassmitter, you might say we use "nitrogen tanks" since most of what we breathe is not, in fact, oxygen.  Now, there are obvious exceptions for deco dives, rebreathers, and of course dive boats always have a tank of pure O2 on board for emergencies, but in most instances, diving with 100% oxygen is a death sentence.

All of that sandy vagina whining aside, I at least have to give it up for your correct usage of 'fins'.  "Fins" go on your feet.  "Flipper" is a dolphin.
 
2013-11-18 02:42:31 PM

Hz so good: Ditto, and that's just 13 feet. Can't even begin to imagine what 685 feet deep would feel like, even in one of those giant Big Daddy type suits.


You need to valsalva even when in as little as eight feet to equalize the pressure across your eardrum, and then regularly as you proceed downward.  That pain doesn't continue unless you fail to equalize, at which point it would just become excruciating and you'd stop anyhow.
 
2013-11-18 02:44:05 PM
"Nick appears to have suffered from a depth-related injury to his lungs," the AIDA statement said.

/Really.
 
2013-11-18 02:45:25 PM
You gotta combine the Zora scale with the iron boots, or else you're gonna have a bad time.
 
2013-11-18 02:48:07 PM

dittybopper: vernonFL: I guess if you dont have any air in your lungs, the pressure changes wouldnt cause them to explode.

It must be possible to dive down 300 feet ann come up again because people have done it, but i don't see how.

Of course not, because it's below the surface.

Much of it appears to be training, along with native ability.  It's amazing what the human body can do.


Didn't the Spanish have the natives swim deep to collect gold bars from wrecks back in the day? Or were those just pearl divers? God knows what the record is for a muff diver holding his breath.
 
2013-11-18 02:48:32 PM
The shocking thing to me is that he made it all the way back up to the surface, then died.

Hz so good: "The longest time ever recorded between skydiver and parachute leaving the plane and linking up is 50 seconds"


NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE
 
2013-11-18 02:50:01 PM

durbnpoisn: dittybopper: vernonFL: The first thing you are taught in scuba diving is to never hold your breath. The second thing is to always ascend slowly.

This is free-diving, ie., holding your breath and seeing how deep you can go.  The normal cautions you find in SCUBA diving don't really apply because you aren't forcing gasses into your bloodstream.

You're also only at depth for a nanosecond, so the nitrogen doesn't have a chance to dissapate into your bloodstream - which is what causes the bends.


Actually, for several minutes.

But you aren't breathing, so you aren't adding any additional nitrogen to your blood that can bubble out with decreased pressure, so you're mostly good.

Mostly.
 
2013-11-18 02:51:24 PM

factoryconnection: Hz so good: Ditto, and that's just 13 feet. Can't even begin to imagine what 685 feet deep would feel like, even in one of those giant Big Daddy type suits.

You need to valsalva use any number of techniques to open your airspaces even when in as little as eight feet at the surface to equalize the pressure across your eardrum, and then regularly as you proceed downward (and upward to eliminate reverse blocks).  That pain doesn't continue unless you fail to equalize, at which point it would just become excruciating and you'd stop anyhow you wouldn't really feel it when your eardrum bursts open and all the nerves are destroyed, but you'd notice your equilibrium being completely farked up and realize you screwed the pooch..


FTFY.  I haven't used the Valsalva technique since about dive number 10.  I wiggle my jaw, or I yawn.
 
Displayed 50 of 121 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report