If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Washington Post)   White suburbia learns that all their children are not above average (no word on whether the women are strong and the men are good looking)   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 141
    More: Obvious, Common Core, U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan, meats, Common Core State Standards  
•       •       •

9307 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Nov 2013 at 10:28 AM (35 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



141 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-11-17 09:02:50 AM
Never underestimate the ability of white America to indulge in self-delusion, hypocrisy, and a sense of entitlement. And like the submitter's headline suggests, it's not a race thing. It's a culture thing. White skin doesn't make you think your kid is above average regardless of what the average may be, and white skin doesn't make you think the rules don't apply to you. Parenting and culture do that.
 
2013-11-17 09:54:35 AM
Brought to you by:
www.fullercenter.org
 
2013-11-17 10:00:07 AM
But but but we fled the urban parts so our scores wouldn't be drug down by idiots. Say it ain't so.

I think they should just drop all the BS and teach. The kids can take tests like the ACT or SAT later and it'll get sorted out just fine.
 
2013-11-17 10:20:42 AM

edmo: But but but we fled the urban parts so our scores wouldn't be drug down by idiots. Say it ain't so.

I think they should just drop all the BS and teach. The kids can take tests like the ACT or SAT later and it'll get sorted out just fine.


What about those of us whose parents came from the farm and small towns into suburbia to provide their kids a better life?
 
2013-11-17 10:32:22 AM
In God we trust all others pay cash
 
2013-11-17 10:36:20 AM

whistleridge: Never underestimate the ability of white America to indulge in self-delusion, hypocrisy, and a sense of entitlement. And like the submitter's headline suggests, it's not a race thing. It's a culture thing. White skin doesn't make you think your kid is above average regardless of what the average may be, and white skin doesn't make you think the rules don't apply to you. Parenting and culture do that.


You sound white.
 
2013-11-17 10:36:40 AM
U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan told a group of state schools superintendents Friday that he found it "fascinating" that some of the opposition to the Common Core State Standards has come from "white suburban moms who - all of a sudden - their child isn't as brilliant as they thought they were, and their school isn't quite as good as they thought they were."

Aside from the fact that the above is a single sentence (which is bad), it also misses a verb. Something like 'find out' needs to be in there.
 
2013-11-17 10:36:52 AM

edmo: But but but we fled the urban parts so our scores wouldn't be drug down by idiots. Say it ain't so.

I think they should just drop all the BS and teach. The kids can take tests like the ACT or SAT later and it'll get sorted out just fine.


Right. Those kids who do poorly on the ACT and SAT can start work at McDonald's post haste.
 
2013-11-17 10:39:18 AM
Breaking news: Intelligence is scholastic aptitude is not a direct product of race.

/Now, scholastic aptitude can correlate to poverty which can correlate to income inequality or unemployment which might correlate to race
//Slashies longer than original comment
 
2013-11-17 10:39:54 AM

rnatalie: Brought to you by:
[www.fullercenter.org image 260x198]


Leaving satisfied, dontcha know.
 
2013-11-17 10:42:28 AM
new standardized tests supposedly aligned with the Core.

What do the Marines have to do with this?
 
2013-11-17 10:43:56 AM
education is a complex process, and there is not a perfect solution that fits the whole country.  the best way to help kids get better educated is to get the parents involved and make the kids actually enjoy learning.  both of those things are almost impossible to do.  most parents, both rich and poor, honestly don't have the time to be involved, and there are too many other things distracting most kids from their education, primarily television and video games, and now cell phones.

i'm glad i graduated high school back in the 90s because it seems like public education has gotten significantly worse in the past 15 years.  i'm also terrified of when i have kids, because i have no faith in the public school system.  i would love to homeschool my future kids but i don't think that's a viable option either.
 
2013-11-17 10:44:57 AM
Well my kids took the tests last year and my kids actually are very focused and smart but came back in the average for several cores and only tested above average in one core. It really does raise the standards to a global one and America needs to admit that we have education system problems. We as a country are not number one in primary education.

It is very much a culture thing. Living in suburbia I know a ton of parents who are convinced their average or even kinda slow son is absolutely brilliant. I've seen the way they pressure the schools to get their sons in enrichment programs.

So when I saw my kids' results I knew a whole bunch of other parents must be freaking out! Haha
 
2013-11-17 10:45:51 AM

abhorrent1: new standardized tests supposedly aligned with the Core.

What do the Marines have to do with this?


Simmer Fry!
 
2013-11-17 10:46:20 AM
Hey subby, if all of White Suburbia's children are not above average, that means every single one of them is below average.  Is that what you're saying, or do you not understand logic?  You should have said: "White Suburbia learns that not all of their children...."
 
2013-11-17 10:46:39 AM
Duncan also had the best line later about the conspiracy theories, tea baggers, and other crazies that have been criticizing Common Core.
"The Common Core has become a rallying cry for fringe groups that claim it is a scheme for the federal government to usurp state and local control of what students learn. An op-ed in the New York Times called the Common Core "a radical curriculum." It is neither radical nor a curriculum. ... When the critics can't persuade you that the Common Core is a curriculum, they make even more outlandish claims. They say that the Common Core calls for federal collection of student data. For the record, it doesn't, we're not allowed to, and we won't. And let's not even get into the really wacky stuff: mind control, robots, and biometric brain mapping. "
 
2013-11-17 10:47:38 AM

KawaiiNot: Well my kids took the tests last year and my kids actually are very focused and smart but came back in the average for several cores and only tested above average in one core.


Your kids are average.  Sorry.
 
2013-11-17 10:50:15 AM
www.biography.com

I have a dream that one day my four little children will one day live in a country where they are judged not by the color of their skin but by their scores on standardized tests.
 
2013-11-17 10:50:31 AM
Speaking as a math teacher, Common Core might result in some positive gains -- but it's being implemented about as poorly as humanly possible -- so it's rather difficult to claim it's a good thing.

A decent analogy would be training a teenager to drive a car, and then when it comes time for the driving test, they're blindfolded and put in the pilot seat of an airplane.  When the kid inevitably fails, the driving trainers are blamed.  The driving teachers were told before the training:  "Teach this kid how to control a vehicle."  The driving teachers were never given access to either a car or a plane throughout any of this -- they simply used whatever they could buy with their own money.
 
2013-11-17 10:51:38 AM
What about the Asian suburban kids?
 
2013-11-17 10:51:38 AM

ThrillaManilla: KawaiiNot: Well my kids took the tests last year and my kids actually are very focused and smart but came back in the average for several cores and only tested above average in one core.

Your kids are average.  Sorry.


Yes, globally average and above average in one core. Doesn't bother me. The point is that a whole lot of suburban entitled parents are finding out their kids are globally below average and they are freaking out about it.
 
2013-11-17 10:55:49 AM
Stupid headline... Be more funny!
 
2013-11-17 10:56:53 AM

Blink: Speaking as a math teacher, Common Core might result in some positive gains -- but it's being implemented about as poorly as humanly possible -- so it's rather difficult to claim it's a good thing.

A decent analogy would be training a teenager to drive a car, and then when it comes time for the driving test, they're blindfolded and put in the pilot seat of an airplane.  When the kid inevitably fails, the driving trainers are blamed.  The driving teachers were told before the training:  "Teach this kid how to control a vehicle."  The driving teachers were never given access to either a car or a plane throughout any of this -- they simply used whatever they could buy with their own money.


I really would like to hear more about this from actual educators. Education threads have always caught my interest.

/wanted to be a teacher
//before I found out how torturous it is
///thank Odin I dodged no child left behind
 
2013-11-17 10:57:06 AM

rnatalie: I have a dream that one day my four little children will one day live in a country where they are judged not by the color of their skin but by their scores on standardized tests.


+1
 
2013-11-17 10:58:04 AM

Deep Contact: What about the Asian suburban kids?


Straight A average.
 
2013-11-17 10:58:49 AM
When I was in high school in Minnesota back in the late 90s, our school hosted several foreign exchange students from Germany and Brazil. Those kids freaked out when they realized how far nehind coming to the US was going to leave them in cpmparison to their peers back home. One even left early. I went to a well-respected, but public school. How can the US prrepare everyone to be "the best" when other countries test for "the best" and then teach the rest how to ACTUALLY DO SOMETHING in terms of getting a job. Im already starting to see how little masters degrees have, as many who have them still can't tie their own shoes.
 
2013-11-17 11:00:25 AM
The delusion of being nice is more important than the truth.

Biology is not more important than upbringing, okay? Everyone is born exactly and totally equal. Intelligence is a Choice!
 
2013-11-17 11:00:28 AM
The most shocking point for me was somehow, 350 million wasn't enough to develop a couple of math and reading tests.

And do Mississippi schools really want to be measured on the same metric and directly compared to New England schools? I doubt it.
 
2013-11-17 11:00:38 AM
From what I have seen, common core uses nonconventional methods of doing math that confuses the fark out of kids who already know how to do math.  Asking questions about how to proceed with their weird procedures and not what the actual answer is will give poor results

http://twitchy.com/2013/10/04/must-see-common-core-math-problems-of- th e-day-pics/

I have the equivalent of a minor in math, and have no clue what a 'subtraction sentence' is.
 
2013-11-17 11:01:10 AM

enderthexenocide: education is a complex process, and there is not a perfect solution that fits the whole country.  the best way to help kids get better educated is to get the parents involved and make the kids actually enjoy learning.  both of those things are almost impossible to do.  most parents, both rich and poor, honestly don't have the time to be involved, and there are too many other things distracting most kids from their education, primarily television and video games, and now cell phones.

i'm glad i graduated high school back in the 90s because it seems like public education has gotten significantly worse in the past 15 years.  i'm also terrified of when i have kids, because i have no faith in the public school system.  i would love to homeschool my future kids but i don't think that's a viable option either.


I sent my kids to private school from PK3 through 2nd grade so that they had an excellent base education. Then I pulled them out to go to public school. And when public school is lacking, such as teaching to the tests rather than teaching the kids to think, I supplement their education at home. This hybrid method allows me to work full-time and still maximize the education. We supplement with trips to places of historical importance, museums, etc. as well as science experiments and--get this--we discuss things with our kids (politics, finance, etc.) amazing how much you can do with a little planning and a commitment not to let your child be an uneducated semiliterate moran.
 
2013-11-17 11:04:20 AM
"The Common Core was designed to elevate teaching and learning. Supporters say it does that;   say it doesn't and that some of the standards, especially for young children, are not developmentally appropriate."

What does that even mean?
It does matter if you give out calculus tests, some of the kids are going to do better than the mass of average in the middle and much better than the focused brain mush on the bottom.
 
2013-11-17 11:05:38 AM
I was born in Jersey City, NJ, but grew up in a lower middle class town in Bergen County, NJ.  I'd like a to label the white, American, suburban society, but I don't any words that fit.  Can't  refer to them as  petit bourgeois,  Unlike European petit bourgeois, the American suburban class has no culture.
 
2013-11-17 11:06:36 AM

doubleextra: When I was in high school in Minnesota back in the late 90s, our school hosted several foreign exchange students from Germany and Brazil. Those kids freaked out when they realized how far nehind coming to the US was going to leave them in cpmparison to their peers back home. One even left early. I went to a well-respected, but public school. How can the US prrepare everyone to be "the best" when other countries test for "the best" and then teach the rest how to ACTUALLY DO SOMETHING in terms of getting a job. Im already starting to see how little masters degrees have, as many who have them still can't tie their own shoes.


Oh, like school is about education and job competition, huh?

Not about letting kids just be kids, letting them learn and explore creatively, and most importantly, letting them not be home when their parents are at work.
 
2013-11-17 11:07:49 AM

doubleextra: When I was in high school in Minnesota back in the late 90s, our school hosted several foreign exchange students from Germany and Brazil. Those kids freaked out when they realized how far nehind coming to the US was going to leave them in cpmparison to their peers back home. One even left early. I went to a well-respected, but public school. How can the US prrepare everyone to be "the best" when other countries test for "the best" and then teach the rest how to ACTUALLY DO SOMETHING in terms of getting a job. Im already starting to see how little masters degrees have, as many who have them still can't tie their own shoes.


=============

America has never really been a meritocracy.  The US has always been about exploitation.
 
2013-11-17 11:08:06 AM

SPARC Pile: Duncan also had the best line later about the conspiracy theories, tea baggers, and other crazies that have been criticizing Common Core.
"The Common Core has become a rallying cry for fringe groups that claim it is a scheme for the federal government to usurp state and local control of what students learn. An op-ed in the New York Times called the Common Core "a radical curriculum." It is neither radical nor a curriculum. ... When the critics can't persuade you that the Common Core is a curriculum, they make even more outlandish claims. They say that the Common Core calls for federal collection of student data. For the record, it doesn't, we're not allowed to, and we won't. And let's not even get into the really wacky stuff: mind control, robots, and biometric brain mapping. "


Oh, I wish it would.  State and local officials are, by and large, farking retards.  I barely trust my local officials to deliver trash pick-up.  Sure, the federales can be chuckleheads, but at least they are chuckleheads smart enough to get into Washington.  Think about it: in Texas there are people too dumb to beat Ted Cruz.  I am not real happy about his input into a federal standard; but I am absolutely terrified of giving that power to those even more wackadoodle than him.  "Local control of education" means "Retard Jesus sez 'book lernin' is of the Debil!'"  I want a common baseline across the country, not good education in blue states, and Alabama refusing to teach anything except the colors red and white.
 
2013-11-17 11:09:02 AM
He's right.

To the outragemobile!
 
2013-11-17 11:09:28 AM
Bad teachers don't like standardised tests.
This is because their teaching efforts can be quantified and evaluated.

Good teachers do like standardised tests.
This is because their teaching efforts can be quantified and evaluated.
 
2013-11-17 11:09:35 AM
Duh, anyone who goes to a public school is not above average anything. If any of these brats would step foot in a decent private school they will be shocked to see how the curriculum is at least 1-2 years ahead of your typical public school.

/Glad I went to a private school
//Went to a public school for 1 year and was placed in advanced classes
///was still bored... they really dumb things down
 
2013-11-17 11:10:32 AM

Kuta: edmo: But but but we fled the urban parts so our scores wouldn't be drug down by idiots. Say it ain't so.

I think they should just drop all the BS and teach. The kids can take tests like the ACT or SAT later and it'll get sorted out just fine.

Right. Those kids who do poorly on the ACT and SAT can start work at McDonald's post haste.


It is the circle of life.  Some antelope are just destined to be a meal.  It takes audacious humans to think this is a flawed plan.
 
2013-11-17 11:10:38 AM

TheGreatGazoo: From what I have seen...http://twitchy


See, there's your problem.
 
2013-11-17 11:10:53 AM
Most of us are average.
Some are better
Some are worse

If more of us were either better or worse, then THAT would be the average.

Welcome to the real world.
You will not get a ribbon.

You get to survive.
 
2013-11-17 11:11:02 AM

o_blah: Blink: Speaking as a math teacher, Common Core might result in some positive gains -- but it's being implemented about as poorly as humanly possible -- so it's rather difficult to claim it's a good thing.

A decent analogy would be training a teenager to drive a car, and then when it comes time for the driving test, they're blindfolded and put in the pilot seat of an airplane.  When the kid inevitably fails, the driving trainers are blamed.  The driving teachers were told before the training:  "Teach this kid how to control a vehicle."  The driving teachers were never given access to either a car or a plane throughout any of this -- they simply used whatever they could buy with their own money.

I really would like to hear more about this from actual educators. Education threads have always caught my interest.

/wanted to be a teacher
//before I found out how torturous it is
///thank Odin I dodged no child left behind


as a parent of a child in a Title I school with 80% of the student body receiving free or reduced lunch...horse shiat. the materials the teachers have to teach to the core standards (at least in my district) are just fine. ( the tradin reading and math in particular are amazing. my first grader is reading at what we used to consider a third grade level, and doing basic farking ALGEBRA!) The problem is a) the parents. " What the hell is this " new math"? what are these dirty socialists teaching my kid? I won't support this at home and will actively undermine the teacher by teaching my kid what I think it should be!" and b) the state, that won't shiat or get off the pot about WHICH testing scheme they are going to use, because anything publically discussed that includes the word "core" makes the republican base in this state lose their collective shiat.
 
2013-11-17 11:11:02 AM

whistleridge: Never underestimate the ability of white America to indulge in self-delusion, hypocrisy, and a sense of entitlement. And like the submitter's headline suggests, it's not a race thing. It's a culture thing. White skin doesn't make you think your kid is above average regardless of what the average may be, and white skin doesn't make you think the rules don't apply to you. Parenting and culture do that.


Nice, racist troll to kick of the thread.  Bravo.
 
2013-11-17 11:12:19 AM

sendtodave: doubleextra: When I was in high school in Minnesota back in the late 90s, our school hosted several foreign exchange students from Germany and Brazil. Those kids freaked out when they realized how far nehind coming to the US was going to leave them in cpmparison to their peers back home. One even left early. I went to a well-respected, but public school. How can the US prrepare everyone to be "the best" when other countries test for "the best" and then teach the rest how to ACTUALLY DO SOMETHING in terms of getting a job. Im already starting to see how little masters degrees have, as many who have them still can't tie their own shoes.

Oh, like school is about education and job competition, huh?

Not about letting kids just be kids, letting them learn and explore creatively, and most importantly, letting them not be home when their parents are at work.


That's what the mall is for.
 
2013-11-17 11:14:12 AM

LtDarkstar: Duh, anyone who goes to a public school is not above average anything. If any of these brats would step foot in a decent private school they will be shocked to see how the curriculum is at least 1-2 years ahead of your typical public school. /Glad I went to a private school


Thanks for sharing your vast experience with one private school and one public school that encompasses all of American education.
 
2013-11-17 11:14:48 AM

Nutsac_Jim: Kuta: edmo: But but but we fled the urban parts so our scores wouldn't be drug down by idiots. Say it ain't so.

I think they should just drop all the BS and teach. The kids can take tests like the ACT or SAT later and it'll get sorted out just fine.

Right. Those kids who do poorly on the ACT and SAT can start work at McDonald's post haste.

It is the circle of life.  Some antelope are just destined to be a meal.  It takes audacious humans to think this is a flawed plan.


seriously. there is no shame in being a mill worker, lineman, plumber, etc.
 
2013-11-17 11:16:05 AM
Common Core textbook quotes - "Explain how Thomas Jefferson was a hypocrite"  "I pledge to do what my President says unconditionally"  "Many argue that the Constitution is outdated and no longer useful. Is an effort to start over legitimate or not?"

Common Core = Communism.

If you can't understand that, GTFO out of America.
 
2013-11-17 11:17:40 AM

letrole: Bad teachers don't like standardised tests.
This is because their teaching efforts can be quantified and evaluated.

Good teachers do like standardised tests.
This is because their teaching efforts can be quantified and evaluated.


Troll, right?

Bad teachers don't like students.
Good teachers do like students.

A teacher liking standardized tests is a bit like a doctor liking insurance paperwork.  It's something we have to do, but sure as hell could do without it.  Good teachers couldn't care less about what a bureaucratic piece of paper says about their instruction.  However, when you see an individual student mentally engaging with a concept -- that means something.
 
2013-11-17 11:17:42 AM

Fissile: meritocracy


Fissile: doubleextra: When I was in high school in Minnesota back in the late 90s, our school hosted several foreign exchange students from Germany and Brazil. Those kids freaked out when they realized how far nehind coming to the US was going to leave them in cpmparison to their peers back home. One even left early. I went to a well-respected, but public school. How can the US prrepare everyone to be "the best" when other countries test for "the best" and then teach the rest how to ACTUALLY DO SOMETHING in terms of getting a job. Im already starting to see how little masters degrees have, as many who have them still can't tie their own shoes.

=============

America has never really been a meritocracy.  The US has always been about exploitation.


It that where someone actually does something, and then other workers decide they want to join that party and do more of it.   Exploitation.

Thats not the traditional use of the word.  Usually it means forcing someone to do something they dont want
so you can take from them.
like this guy.img.fark.net
 
2013-11-17 11:17:52 AM

TheGreatGazoo: From what I have seen, common core uses nonconventional methods of doing math that confuses the fark out of kids who already know how to do math.  Asking questions about how to proceed with their weird procedures and not what the actual answer is will give poor results

http://twitchy.com/2013/10/04/must-see-common-core-math-problems-of- th e-day-pics/

I have the equivalent of a minor in math, and have no clue what a 'subtraction sentence' is.


One of my two majors was math, and all my electives were additional math that was beyond the undergrad curriculum, and for the life of me I have no idea WTF that first question, or that process they explain in the second picture are babbling about.  If that's what they are teaching children these days this nation will be in for a huge shortage of scientists, engineers, technicians, architects, etc.  There's no way you could take that line of reasoning and scale it up to something even as simple as basic integration.

/I haz a sad now
 
Displayed 50 of 141 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report