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(CNN)   What kind of shiathole are you in when garbage preserved by sewage is considered a major archaeological find?   (cnn.com) divider line 44
    More: Florida, environmental scientist, cap gun  
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7683 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Nov 2013 at 5:04 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



44 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-11-17 12:57:55 AM  
archaeologists love garbage pits and sewers. and graveyards.
 
2013-11-17 05:08:10 AM  
LOL. Subby doesn't understand archaeology.
 
2013-11-17 05:19:16 AM  
I also live in FL and when digging a trench for a water line, came across bottles and pottery bits from 75-100 years ago. A lot less valuable than this find, but still interesting. The county declared it an archaeological site, to my amusement.
 
2013-11-17 05:24:03 AM  
the spear point is awesome.
 
2013-11-17 05:30:37 AM  
Pretty cool .
 
2013-11-17 05:39:44 AM  
Garbage, subby? You sound dumb.
 
2013-11-17 05:43:25 AM  
Florida is the answer suybb was looking for
 
2013-11-17 05:46:13 AM  
I guess subby is a total idiot.

Or thinks that only gold, jewels and real old stuff is a "major archaeological find", which is pretty much the same thing.
 
2013-11-17 05:59:32 AM  
I'm surprised they didn't find mammoth bones.
 
2013-11-17 06:00:51 AM  
Herculaneum?
 
2013-11-17 06:28:36 AM  
"I'm guessing that it was probably either intentionally dumped there or accidentally dropped"

Sometimes I wish I were smart enough to be a scientist.
 
2013-11-17 06:42:42 AM  
Gary?
 
2013-11-17 06:52:21 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: LOL. Subby doesn't understand archaeology.


Nor does the person who green lit that headline

libranoelrose: Florida is the answer suybb was looking for


Guess you don't either.
 
2013-11-17 06:54:04 AM  
S**T BELONGS IN A MUSEUM!
 
2013-11-17 07:04:18 AM  
FTA: "Anything younger than 50 years does not meet Florida's definition of an artifact..."

How many Artifacts here have Fark Handles?

/You should be in a museum
 
433 [TotalFark]
2013-11-17 07:21:14 AM  
This is a fine headline! You guys aren't quite grasping the notion of humorous headlines very well at all.
 
2013-11-17 07:28:30 AM  

433: This is a fine headline! You guys aren't quite grasping the notion of humorous headlines very well at all.


It wasn't even fair to midden.
 
2013-11-17 07:33:46 AM  

433: This is a fine headline! You guys aren't quite grasping the notion of humorous headlines very well at all.


This guy got it:

image2.findagrave.com
 
2013-11-17 07:42:53 AM  

433: This is a fine headline! You guys aren't quite grasping the notion of humorous headlines very well at all.


Nothing to grasp as it's not a humorous headline.
 
2013-11-17 07:46:50 AM  
I live in St Augustine and stuff like this is found all the time. In this county though everything belongs to the State because of possible historical significance.

Growing up in Wakulla County, Florida we would spend a lot of time on the Wakulla River. Me, my dad, and my cousins would dive up artifacts from that river quite often. Cannon balls from the Civil War were a common item found. We had many of them around our home. Indian arrow heads were another. Liquor bottles that dated back to the early-mid 1800's were also found. Those were usually worth good money. Without the liquor though.

Many of the things found in rivers and springs in Florida could be called garbage, but after a certain time they became much more than that and tell of a era when things were much different here. St Marks, Florida for example(which sits at the head of the Wakulla River) was founded in the 1600's so there's no telling what you'd find around there. Don't discount something as garbage that might actually be history.
 
2013-11-17 07:48:31 AM  
This is a metaphor for Dick Cheney's heart transplant, right?
 
2013-11-17 08:25:03 AM  

draa: I live in St Augustine and stuff like this is found all the time. In this county though everything belongs to the State because of possible historical significance.

Growing up in Wakulla County, Florida we would spend a lot of time on the Wakulla River. Me, my dad, and my cousins would dive up artifacts from that river quite often. Cannon balls from the Civil War were a common item found. We had many of them around our home. Indian arrow heads were another. Liquor bottles that dated back to the early-mid 1800's were also found. Those were usually worth good money. Without the liquor though.

Many of the things found in rivers and springs in Florida could be called garbage, but after a certain time they became much more than that and tell of a era when things were much different here. St Marks, Florida for example(which sits at the head of the Wakulla River) was founded in the 1600's so there's no telling what you'd find around there. Don't discount something as garbage that might actually be history.


One man's junk is another man's treasure, as they say. I was canoeing on the Wacissa River (not far from the Wakulla)when I noticed some official-looking signs back in an eddy.  Eased back in there and saw a partially excavated dug-out canoe, resting on the bottom.

I believe that coals were used as part of the process to hollow out the tree trunks.  Anyway, I'm in the 21st century in a fiberglass canoe, peering down at evidence that people had been using the same flotation principal here for a long, long time.  Pretty cool.
 
2013-11-17 08:41:42 AM  
FTFA:  Anything younger than 50 years does not meet Florida's definition of an artifact and was not saved.

Florida now considers me an artifact?
 
2013-11-17 08:41:53 AM  
Came for St. Aug., leaving satisfied. They should dredge Otter Springs next, but the flow is so slow that it often turns into a siphon, so it will likely become a muck pit again in no time.

I never found points, but my first Florida shark's tooth was one from an extinct great white, found in Salt Springs, and in nearby Silver Glenn I discovered a potshard. I had friends who routinely pulled Civil War artifacts from the muck in Ocean Pond near Olustee, and my best find ever were a fossil caiman skull from Ponte Vedra as well as Glyptodon and 'Gator skin "scutes". That's one of the few things I miss about Florida: relic hunting, and the Springs.
 
2013-11-17 08:49:26 AM  

Lee451: FTFA:  Anything younger than 50 years does not meet Florida's definition of an artifact and was not saved.

Florida now considers me an artifact?


I was going to say no because you would have to stay still for 50 years, but I don't want to make assumptions about when was the last time you left your house.
 
2013-11-17 08:58:45 AM  
Don't worry, I just re-checked my toilet...... no major finds there.

At least nothing older than 50 yrs, that is.
And, *no*, I will not be checking my neighbors' toilets. Raised a bit of a stink last time.
 
2013-11-17 09:25:51 AM  
"Garbage preserved by sewage" is actually an excellent way to describe the contents of CNN's front page on any given day.

Today's MOST IMPORTANT NEWS:
- Celebrity jerk talks about jesus
- Other celebrity jerk talks about money
- Completely made-up details of titillating murder
- Other celebrity jerk talks about their recent PR campaign
- Other celebrity jerk talks about previously-mentioned celebrity jerk
- CNN interviews Mrs. Edna Humpwaffle, 63, of Butt Neck, IN, about jesus
- Unresearched suppositions about some stuff nobody will ever read, because the NEXT LINK IS:
- Celebrity jerk: "Bla bla bla bla!!!!"
 
2013-11-17 09:40:20 AM  

Speef: "Garbage preserved by sewage" is actually an excellent way to describe the contents of CNN's front page on any given day.

Today's MOST IMPORTANT NEWS:
- Celebrity jerk talks about jesus
- Other celebrity jerk talks about money
- Completely made-up details of titillating murder
- Other celebrity jerk talks about their recent PR campaign
- Other celebrity jerk talks about previously-mentioned celebrity jerk
- CNN interviews Mrs. Edna Humpwaffle, 63, of Butt Neck, IN, about jesus
- Unresearched suppositions about some stuff nobody will ever read, because the NEXT LINK IS:
- Celebrity jerk: "Bla bla bla bla!!!!"


[Checks CNN front page...]
Wow, you're not only bitter, you're full of crap too! How fun it must be to be you.
 
2013-11-17 10:05:02 AM  
This is about 15 mins from my house and is a beautiful area to canoe, fish and camp.
Nothing else worth a sh*t for 300 miles though.
 
2013-11-17 10:07:01 AM  

StrikitRich: AverageAmericanGuy: LOL. Subby doesn't understand archaeology.

Nor does the person who green lit that headline

libranoelrose: Florida is the answer suybb was looking for

Guess you don't either.


could you explain what you mean please?
 
2013-11-17 10:30:14 AM  

Lee451: FTFA:  Anything younger than 50 years does not meet Florida's definition of an artifact and was not saved.

Florida now considers me an artifact?


No, just the next candidate for a Silver Alert.
 
2013-11-17 10:42:03 AM  

libranoelrose: StrikitRich: AverageAmericanGuy: LOL. Subby doesn't understand archaeology.

Nor does the person who green lit that headline

libranoelrose: Florida is the answer suybb was looking for

Guess you don't either.

could you explain what you mean please?


I think I was pretty clear the first time.
 
2013-11-17 10:45:01 AM  

StrikitRich: libranoelrose: StrikitRich: AverageAmericanGuy: LOL. Subby doesn't understand archaeology.

Nor does the person who green lit that headline

libranoelrose: Florida is the answer suybb was looking for

Guess you don't either.

could you explain what you mean please?

I think I was pretty clear the first time.


no you were not

do you mean to say florida is not a shiat hole?
 
2013-11-17 10:58:55 AM  
draa:
Many of the things found in rivers and springs in Florida could be called garbage, but after a certain time they became much more than that and tell of a era when things were much different here.

That's a great point, that a lot of people seem to miss.  What archaeologists are really trying to discover was what life was like for people of the past.  The "stuff" we find is not valuable in its own right; it is valuable because of what it can tell us about ancient people.  "Finding treasure" seems exciting, I guess, but it doesn't really help us understand anything about the past.  Finding "garbage" can actually tell us a lot.  To put it in perspective, if someone wanted to know what my life was like, they would learn a lot more by sifting through my garbage can than by looking at my bank balance.
 
2013-11-17 11:24:02 AM  

thespindrifter: I never found points, but my first Florida shark's tooth was one from an extinct great white, found in Salt Springs, and in nearby Silver Glenn I discovered a potshard. I had friends who routinely pulled Civil War artifacts from the muck in Ocean Pond near Olustee, and my best find ever were a fossil caiman skull from Ponte Vedra as well as Glyptodon and 'Gator skin "scutes". That's one of the few things I miss about Florida: relic hunting, and the Springs.


Around 40 years ago you could walk down the beach at Shell Point (in Wakulla County) and find arrow heads and spear tips that the surf had uncovered. We had dozens of them back then as kids. Of course we never knew their value so none were ever saved. They stopped people from taking them some years back though and now they'd lock you up if they caught you doing it.

The area I'm from was inhabited by native peoples for centuries and there's shell mounds bigger than some houses. Easily 40 feet tall and 300 feet or more in diameter at their base. I often wondered how long it took those Indians to eat that many oysters.
 
2013-11-17 11:37:13 AM  

FloydA: To put it in perspective, if someone wanted to know what my life was like, they would learn a lot more by sifting through my garbage can than by looking at my bank balance.


I loved going to old abandoned home sites when I was growing up and digging through trash piles that were left behind. Some of those places were 150+ years old and I found a bunch of neat stuff doing that. And a lot of snakes. They like to hole up in glass jars underground and it makes a perfect place to get out of the cold weather. Still, as a 13 year old boy there was nothing better than digging through old garbage piles and finding snakes. At least to me anyway.

/yes, I'm a little weird
 
2013-11-17 12:23:34 PM  

draa: I loved going to old abandoned home sites when I was growing up and digging through trash piles that were left behind. Some of those places were 150+ years old and I found a bunch of neat stuff doing that. And a lot of snakes. They like to hole up in glass jars underground and it makes a perfect place to get out of the cold weather. Still, as a 13 year old boy there was nothing better than digging through old garbage piles and finding snakes. At least to me anyway.
/yes, I'm a little weird


My mother used to take us garbage-picking regularly at old homesteads, looking for bottles. If you think that people aren't regularly sifting through old "garbage" piles to look for treasure, think again. People love to look for old stuff.
 
2013-11-17 12:39:09 PM  
I came just to see all the Florons/Floridiots get their panties twisted about the headline.
 
2013-11-17 01:00:32 PM  

cryinoutloud: draa: I loved going to old abandoned home sites when I was growing up and digging through trash piles that were left behind. Some of those places were 150+ years old and I found a bunch of neat stuff doing that. And a lot of snakes. They like to hole up in glass jars underground and it makes a perfect place to get out of the cold weather. Still, as a 13 year old boy there was nothing better than digging through old garbage piles and finding snakes. At least to me anyway.
/yes, I'm a little weird

My mother used to take us garbage-picking regularly at old homesteads, looking for bottles. If you think that people aren't regularly sifting through old "garbage" piles to look for treasure, think again. People love to look for old stuff.


sounds a lot like looting. going on land you don't own searching for valuable artifacts.
 
2013-11-17 01:12:32 PM  

pedobearapproved: sounds a lot like looting. going on land you don't own searching for valuable artifacts.


In most case the people that own the land don't care. And in some cases they're long gone. Besides, it's not like your panning for gold and if they really cared about that stuff they wouldn't have thrown it in a trash pile to begin with.
 
2013-11-17 01:13:38 PM  

pedobearapproved: sounds a lot like looting. going on land you don't own searching for valuable artifacts.


You sound like someone who doesn't have a lick of imagination.
 
2013-11-17 01:49:53 PM  

cryinoutloud: pedobearapproved: sounds a lot like looting. going on land you don't own searching for valuable artifacts.

You sound like someone who doesn't have a lick of imagination.


The line between archaeology and looting is extremely fuzzy and gray. The more so when regular people are doing it for fun and edification.
 
2013-11-17 01:51:18 PM  

FloydA: draa:
Many of the things found in rivers and springs in Florida could be called garbage, but after a certain time they became much more than that and tell of a era when things were much different here.

That's a great point, that a lot of people seem to miss.  What archaeologists are really trying to discover was what life was like for people of the past.  The "stuff" we find is not valuable in its own right; it is valuable because of what it can tell us about ancient people.  "Finding treasure" seems exciting, I guess, but it doesn't really help us understand anything about the past.  Finding "garbage" can actually tell us a lot.  To put it in perspective, if someone wanted to know what my life was like, they would learn a lot more by sifting through my garbage can than by looking at my bank balance.


This.  I LOVE this stuff, and I took it a step further and studied human bones/skeletons.   Fresh bones or old, both tell stories.
 
2013-11-17 07:04:23 PM  
I've spent many a weekend slowly sifting through middens and privies under the supervision of professional archaeologists, so I'm really getting a kick out of the headline.
 
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