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(International Education)   Want a college education without crushing student debt? Did you know other countries have universities too? Enrollment in foreign colleges triples in the past few years   (iie.org) divider line 119
    More: Cool, higher educations, student debt, United States, Assistant Secretary of State, graduate students, Americans, study abroad, course credits  
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5285 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Nov 2013 at 3:37 PM (41 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-11-16 02:59:44 PM
 
2013-11-16 03:24:57 PM
We may not be investing well for our future, but you'd better believe that bank execs are making a killing. Everbody wins.
 
2013-11-16 03:40:29 PM
cdn.picture2life.com
What a foreign collage might look like.
 
2013-11-16 03:40:29 PM
Why would I want to enroll in a foreign art production technique, subs?  An, art degree from a foreign school is just as worthless as an art degree from an in-country school.
 
2013-11-16 03:41:25 PM
I guess those foreign colleges don't teach you how to spell English.
 
2013-11-16 03:41:43 PM

lokis_mentor: Why would I want to enroll in a foreign art production technique, subs?  An, art degree from a foreign school is just as worthless as an art degree from an in-country school.


But the experience itself is probably worth it.
 
2013-11-16 03:42:06 PM
I just feel out of place in a collage, like I just don't fit.
 
2013-11-16 03:42:42 PM
I've been looking for a use of all of my pictures I took in Europe, though isn't a foreign collage something more geared towards tween girls?
 
2013-11-16 03:43:23 PM
I was going to enroll in a foreign collage, but it turns out I just couldn't cut it.
 
2013-11-16 03:43:44 PM
or stay at home and go to state school.
 
2013-11-16 03:44:07 PM
And if there's a coup, the 82nd Airborne will come rescue you!
 
2013-11-16 03:45:02 PM
www.luisescobarblog.com
 
2013-11-16 03:45:48 PM
RIP US Collagen
img.fark.net
 
2013-11-16 03:45:58 PM

Fun Dumpster: I've been looking for a use of all of my pictures I took in Europe, though isn't a foreign collage something more geared towards tween girls?


pics or it didnt happen....
 
2013-11-16 03:46:09 PM
'collages'???  someone needs to go to 'collage'
 
2013-11-16 03:47:29 PM
I had a friend who wanted to go abroad for Women Studies.  I told her I heard Afghanistan had some nice programs.  She doesn't talk to me much anymore.
 
2013-11-16 03:47:46 PM
I am a programmer with no degree. I work for a Fortune 100 company writing financial management software. I would like a useless piece of paper for the hiring luddites. Hepl.
 
2013-11-16 03:48:30 PM

Maturin: [cdn.picture2life.com image 544x473]
What a foreign collage might look like.


Came for "foreign collage", leaving satisfied.
 
2013-11-16 03:48:31 PM
Heh!  Subby spelled it wrong.  To funny!
 
2013-11-16 03:48:34 PM

gilgamesh23: I was going to enroll in a foreign collage, but it turns out I just couldn't cut it.


BWAAAAAAHAAHAHAAAAAHAHAA!

/ No serious - *snort* - that was funny.
 
2013-11-16 03:49:08 PM
"Collages?"
 
2013-11-16 03:49:15 PM

Naritai: RIP US Collagen
[img.fark.net image 130x167]


urbancliq.com
 
2013-11-16 03:49:48 PM
Ironically, seeing as Homeland Security made it hard for top students and top professors alike to go to US universities. Canada, Australia, New Zealand ... and the UK possibly ... took up a lot of slack--valuable, creative slack.

Mmmmm ... delicious slack. Beware the stealers of slack.

A lot of Americans go to Canadian schools because it is, even with the much higher fees that are charged foreign students, dirt cheap and good value. Canada is fairly homelike for Northern US students and professors.

Canada has fewer than 100 universities to 16,000 or so in the USA, but they are all good or middle rank universities, whereas the US has a small number of great universities and a large number of jumped up high schools and seminaries and teacher colleges.

If the US adopted Canadian education proportionately it would have less than 1,000 universities. If Canada adopted the US system, it would have about 1,500. Once again, Canadians get the job done on the cheap compared to the US. In fact, we're even more economical in education than we are in health insurance and health care. This is a good thing all in all.

The best American schools, teachers and students are very good and equal to any in the world, but the worst are dismal and drag down the average.

Canada ranks behind a handful of Asian countries (Japan, South Korea, whatever) in math and sciences but that is good. That is very good. The Asians are, if anything, working too hard and a lot of students break down or commit suicide from the stress. The Canadian system is more relaxed but still good. Common sense prevails over intelligence some of the time, and that is good.

Canada is what the USA would be like if it worked more for the people and less for the super rich.
 
2013-11-16 03:50:07 PM
I see they have faculties in Sub Saharan Africa, Rabat, and Cairo.

I wonder if they are party schools?
 
2013-11-16 03:51:41 PM
Btw, the previous comment was snarky. But i do need the paper.
 
2013-11-16 03:52:27 PM
ICWUTUDIDTHR
 
2013-11-16 03:54:45 PM

GDubDub: I am a programmer with no degree. I work for a Fortune 100 company writing financial management software. I would like a useless piece of paper for the hiring luddites. Hepl.


I hear Phoenix Univeristy has an easy B.A. in Stochastic Systems Financial Modeling.  You should try that.
 
2013-11-16 03:55:22 PM

brantgoose: Ironically, seeing as Homeland Security made it hard for top students and top professors alike to go to US universities. Canada, Australia, New Zealand ... and the UK possibly ... took up a lot of slack--valuable, creative slack.

Mmmmm ... delicious slack. Beware the stealers of slack.

A lot of Americans go to Canadian schools because it is, even with the much higher fees that are charged foreign students, dirt cheap and good value. Canada is fairly homelike for Northern US students and professors.

Canada has fewer than 100 universities to 16,000 or so in the USA, but they are all good or middle rank universities, whereas the US has a small number of great universities and a large number of jumped up high schools and seminaries and teacher colleges.

If the US adopted Canadian education proportionately it would have less than 1,000 universities. If Canada adopted the US system, it would have about 1,500. Once again, Canadians get the job done on the cheap compared to the US. In fact, we're even more economical in education than we are in health insurance and health care. This is a good thing all in all.

The best American schools, teachers and students are very good and equal to any in the world, but the worst are dismal and drag down the average.

Canada ranks behind a handful of Asian countries (Japan, South Korea, whatever) in math and sciences but that is good. That is very good. The Asians are, if anything, working too hard and a lot of students break down or commit suicide from the stress. The Canadian system is more relaxed but still good. Common sense prevails over intelligence some of the time, and that is good.

Canada is what the USA would be like if it worked more for the people and less for the super rich.


Yeah, but you've also got a couple universities in Canada that, if you applied your scaling factor, would enroll 400,000 students each in the US.  McGill at 25k is absolutely huge considering the population base of Canada.  So I don't think your math is as compelling as you want it to be.
 
2013-11-16 03:55:52 PM

brantgoose: Ironically, seeing as Homeland Security made it hard for top students and top professors alike to go to US universities.


From the files of "Let's just make this shiat up and see if anyone notices"

http://www.post-gazette.com/neighborhoods-city/2012/11/12/Overseas-s tu dents-set-record-for-U-S-enrollment/stories/201211120177

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/college_bound/2012/11/more_internatio na l_students_drawn_to_us_campuses.html
 
2013-11-16 03:57:44 PM

Maturin: What a foreign collage might look like.


But is our children educated?
 
2013-11-16 03:58:49 PM

theflatline: I see they have faculties in Sub Saharan Africa, Rabat, and Cairo.

I wonder if they are party schools?



You know they are.
psucollegio.com
 
2013-11-16 04:00:34 PM
Far in countries aren't the best places for a collage education.
 
2013-11-16 04:01:41 PM

GDubDub: I am a programmer with no degree. I work for a Fortune 100 company writing financial management software. I would like a useless piece of paper for the hiring luddites. Hepl.


As someone who started programming in the late 70s, let me tell you something, if I may. Right now it makes no difference to you whether or not you have that degree, you are either a talented programmer or you are not. If you are, you do not need a degree. If you are not, no degree can help you.  If, however, your ambitions are to climb the corporate ladder, you will eventually reach the point beyond which most corporations will not promote someone who doesn't have a degree.

Two way around this: work for a smaller company, or become self-employed.  When you're an IT consultant, no one asks you if you have a degree.
 
2013-11-16 04:01:54 PM

The Southern Dandy: Heh!  Subby spelled it wrong.  To funny!


And beyond?
 
2013-11-16 04:02:24 PM

BunkyBrewman: brantgoose: Ironically, seeing as Homeland Security made it hard for top students and top professors alike to go to US universities.

From the files of "Let's just make this shiat up and see if anyone notices"

http://www.post-gazette.com/neighborhoods-city/2012/11/12/Overseas-s tu dents-set-record-for-U-S-enrollment/stories/201211120177

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/college_bound/2012/11/more_internatio na l_students_drawn_to_us_campuses.html


The Canadian Reality Distortion field, is much like the Apple one.
 
2013-11-16 04:04:15 PM

brantgoose: Canada is what the USA would be like if it worked more for the people and less for the super rich



And if my aunt had a dick, she'd be my uncle.
 
2013-11-16 04:05:13 PM

eas81: Naritai: RIP US Collagen
[img.fark.net image 130x167]

[urbancliq.com image 640x360]


Dude, I'm horrified at how quickly you were able to find that image...
 
2013-11-16 04:08:16 PM

TomD9938: brantgoose: Canada is what the USA would be like if it worked more for the people and less for the super rich


And if my aunt had a dick, she'd be my uncle.


Also true.
 
2013-11-16 04:08:20 PM

GDubDub: I am a programmer with no degree. I work for a Fortune 100 company writing financial management software. I would like a useless piece of paper for the hiring luddites. Hepl.


get back to us when you start applying for better paying management positions.
 
2013-11-16 04:09:40 PM
We get a lot of US students in Canadian universities. Our fees aren't as high as some US private schools, though they're often above most state universities. For example, University of Toronto (top ranked in Canada, 21st in the world in 2012, just under University of Michigan to which it's very similar) charges foreign students entering in 2013 $32,075 a year for a BA/BSc, $17,730 for most PhD programs,$38,604 for Law, and $59,923 for Medicine. McGill (34 in the world, 3rd in Canada) is a comparative bargain, especially for PhDs ($3,864).
 
2013-11-16 04:09:45 PM
If we truly cared about education in this country, we'd semi-nationalize everything at at least the high school level, and we'd tie financial aid to the BLS's projections for particular career fields and degrees, and what you can expect to make upon graduation.  Everybody should also have the opportunity to take community college courses for credit beginning in high school, and if you're expecting to get aid for a $20k-40k a year school for some BS undergrad degree, and the required courses for the first year or two can be taken at a junior college, you should be given aid to take those courses at the junior college level.  There's no reason why English 101, 102, or Intro to Psych/Sociology should cost $400 per credit hour, and as taxpayers, we shouldn't be subsidizing them.
 
2013-11-16 04:13:21 PM

Fark It: If we truly cared about education in this country, we'd semi-nationalize everything at at least the high school level, and we'd tie financial aid to the BLS's projections for particular career fields and degrees, and what you can expect to make upon graduation.  Everybody should also have the opportunity to take community college courses for credit beginning in high school, and if you're expecting to get aid for a $20k-40k a year school for some BS undergrad degree, and the required courses for the first year or two can be taken at a junior college, you should be given aid to take those courses at the junior college level.  There's no reason why English 101, 102, or Intro to Psych/Sociology should cost $400 per credit hour, and as taxpayers, we shouldn't be subsidizing them.


I'll keep my private HS, thanks
 
2013-11-16 04:16:32 PM
Just a quick "behind-the-scenes" peek: the admin who greened this link is a mixed media artist who enjoys both foreign and domestic collages.
 
2013-11-16 04:16:45 PM

Johnsnownw: One of the reasons I did my MA in Scotland...


Incest is legal in Scotland?
 
2013-11-16 04:17:24 PM
Spell me like won of you're foren collages
 
2013-11-16 04:18:11 PM
It's really hard to get an understanding of what life is like, or what things cost, when you compare from country X to country Y.

In the United States, I racked up some 50k in student debt to get a degree in computer science.  My monthly payment is something like $140.
Now I live and work in Ireland.  I have Irish co-workers who are SHOCKED at how expensive education is in the US.  They think it is outrageous.  They received a similar education for 'free'.

Except that a large part of my 50k in student debt wasn't tuition, it was cost of living.
Rent, food, transportation, supplies, electricity, etc, etc....

As far as I know, most 'free' Universities don't provide any of that.  And in many places, because it is more affordable, there are actually less programs available.  You can be dirt poor in the US and borrow barrels of money, no problem and it'll pay for your big screen TV in your super cool private dorm.

On top of that - the fact remains that the education isn't free.  It's being paid for, but by tax payers.  Let's say I made $80k (I don't, but let's pretend)...  In the US I'd have an 'effective tax rate' of something like 22%, in Ireland, it would be closer to 30% (In Ireland, you very quickly hit a point where 51% of any additional income you earn is taken in the form of tax.  In the US you'd need to earn a lot more before you hit the maximum tax rate, and it isn't nearly 51%).

80k - US Taxes == 62.4k - Student loan debt (1.8k) is 60.6.k
80k - IRE Taxes == 56k

In the US system, most of the student debt burden is paid by the people who went to school and presumably benefited from it.  In the Irish system, anyone with a job that earns enough to pay taxes is paying for everyone's education.  That doesn't seem fair to me, but to each their own.  Also, using the numbers above, in 10 (or 15, I can't remember) my loans would be repaid.  In the Irish system, I'll continue to pay, forever, until I stop working.

From what I understand, lots of EU countries are similar in regards to education.

It's also worth mentioning that most of the countries won't allow anyone to just show up and get a free education.  Citizens of that country can, but international students can't.

The majority of people I know (including my wife) who are studying abroad pay as much (or more) than they would compared to a US in-state tuition.  They go abroad for the experience.  They don't get free education, they aren't citizens of the country in question and, even if they were dual-citizens of the US and this other country, they wouldn't meet the residency requirements.  If I stick around in Ireland long enough to become a citizen, my children could easily obtain dual citizenship in both the US and Ireland...but in order to attend an Irish university as an Irish student they'd need to *live* in Ireland, for years (I think it is four years) before they could enroll.  Otherwise, they could apply as international students and get charged rates, on par, with US out-of-state tuition.

But yeah, the grass is always greener....
//Ask me about the wonderful free health care sometime!
 
2013-11-16 04:20:27 PM

skullkrusher: or stay at home and go to state school.


Yep.  Many top rated science and tech schools are state.  And it's no coincidence that the U.S. is thronged with foreign university science students.    But if you feel you must go to a small private art school for your cultural studies degree, then well, honestly, we aren't sad that you are leaving the country.
 
2013-11-16 04:20:59 PM

Fark It: There's no reason why English 101, 102, or Intro to Psych/Sociology should cost $400 per credit hour,


I know several people from northern Virginia that couldn't afford four years of college right away, or weren't sure what they were going to do, so they went to one of the NVCC schools.  Most of the credits from introductory classes would transfer to in-state four year schools.   I always thought that that was a cool system; not sure if it still works that way.
 
2013-11-16 04:26:18 PM
I went to a state school in the US and a private university in Colombia costs were about the same except for books.

Everyone chips in to buy one book and then you all have it photocopied.
 
2013-11-16 04:26:33 PM
feeling blue? rest assured that your thrifty. foreign trained psychiatrist was taught by the best mental health experts that the Soviet Union ever produced.
 
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