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(Carlsbad Current Argus)   'Halloween Hall' at Carlsbad Caverns is biggest area discovered in more than 25 years   (currentargus.com) divider line 42
    More: Cool, Halloween Hall, Halloween, area discovered  
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12179 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Nov 2013 at 1:11 PM (40 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



42 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-11-16 01:11:58 PM
Cool. Unfortunately, my love of geology is affected by profound claustrophobia.
 
2013-11-16 01:20:20 PM
Was expecting "biggest area" to be followed by "your mom" somehow.

/has the level of discourse risen on Fark?
 
2013-11-16 01:22:10 PM

FunkOut: Cool. Unfortunately, my love of geology is affected by profound claustrophobia.


Carslbad is big inside - at least most of the areas on the general tours are.  I don't know how bad your claustrophobia is, but I'd be willing to bet the rooms in your home are much much smaller by comparison.
 
2013-11-16 01:25:12 PM
Cool, new reason to stop by Carlsbad on the next trip to Ruidoso to spend all my money at the casinos.
 
2013-11-16 01:25:21 PM

gfid: FunkOut: Cool. Unfortunately, my love of geology is affected by profound claustrophobia.

Carslbad is big inside - at least most of the areas on the general tours are.  I don't know how bad your claustrophobia is, but I'd be willing to bet the rooms in your home are much much smaller by comparison.


But the rooms in your home are not under millions of tons of magically suspended rock. That's where a lot of the panic comes from.
 
2013-11-16 01:32:43 PM
we walked the cavern, it was cool
 
2013-11-16 01:35:51 PM

ecmoRandomNumbers: gfid: FunkOut: Cool. Unfortunately, my love of geology is affected by profound claustrophobia.

Carslbad is big inside - at least most of the areas on the general tours are.  I don't know how bad your claustrophobia is, but I'd be willing to bet the rooms in your home are much much smaller by comparison.

But the rooms in your home are not under millions of tons of magically suspended rock. That's where a lot of the panic comes from.


Sure, but the ceiling of your house is just held there by tiny metal spikes in slowly rotting pieces of wood, put there by the immigrant labor willing to work for the lowest price that day.
 
2013-11-16 01:36:17 PM
They had a chance to use the word "spelunking" and passed? Psshh.
 
2013-11-16 01:36:53 PM
A little crawl goes a long way!
 
2013-11-16 01:38:21 PM
Wasn't that Ted's nickname for Whoopie?
 
GBB
2013-11-16 01:38:27 PM

CreamFilling: ecmoRandomNumbers: gfid: FunkOut: Cool. Unfortunately, my love of geology is affected by profound claustrophobia.

Carslbad is big inside - at least most of the areas on the general tours are.  I don't know how bad your claustrophobia is, but I'd be willing to bet the rooms in your home are much much smaller by comparison.

But the rooms in your home are not under millions of tons of magically suspended rock. That's where a lot of the panic comes from.

Sure, but the ceiling of your house is just held there by tiny metal spikes in slowly rotting pieces of wood, put there by the immigrant labor willing to work for the lowest price that day.


Damnit, stop!   Now I'm afraid to go home.

/going to go search for a cave to live in now.
 
2013-11-16 01:39:18 PM

ecmoRandomNumbers: gfid: FunkOut: Cool. Unfortunately, my love of geology is affected by profound claustrophobia.

Carslbad is big inside - at least most of the areas on the general tours are.  I don't know how bad your claustrophobia is, but I'd be willing to bet the rooms in your home are much much smaller by comparison.

But the rooms in your home are not under millions of tons of magically suspended rock. That's where a lot of the panic comes from.


Magically suspended?
I take it you are not a geologist, an engineer, or have any sort of career that requires critical thought.
Have you ever ridden a subway or driven through a tunnel.  Did you think that those were created by magicians?

And if your house roof suddenly collapses that will kill you just as easily as hundreds of feet of rock.  Humans are somewhat fragile to just a few hundred pounds of weight coming down on us.
 
2013-11-16 01:43:12 PM
I used to love caving. Once, while in Laurel Caverns about 15 years ago, I stood up after going through a crawl space and was knocked out by the lower than expected ceiling. I came to and couldn't move a muscle for what seemed like minutes. My helmet band was slid down to the level of my eyes. The feeling came back and I was able to continue. I was not only relieved that I didn't have a broken neck, but I lucked out and missed the embarrassment of having to be stretchered out. I had a stiff neck for a least 2 months, and now have arthritis in my neck. I haven't been in a wild area of a cave since.
The lesson for all you cave adventurers, stand up slowly anytime you are in a cave, or you might just break your neck.
 
2013-11-16 01:45:34 PM
FTFA:  "(Caves are) a never-ending thing," she added. "Basically, the last frontier to discover."

I believe she neglected to add "...You know- other than the 2/3rds or so of the earth's surface that's below a 1000ft depth."
 
2013-11-16 01:47:26 PM
Bat country.
 
2013-11-16 01:59:51 PM
Was in therea couple times in the 70s and 80s. First time, was kinda dark, not so many lights, went on the big room tour, where they take you down 650', neat being in the cafe, looking up seeing nothing but blackness. Second time did the whole thing, kinda boring walking down the natural trail. So many lights, you coouldm see everything, but removed a lot of the mystery for me. Still okay though. The bat flight at the amphiteater got old fast though.
 
2013-11-16 02:07:16 PM
But enough about your mom's veeg.
 
2013-11-16 02:11:52 PM

GoldDude: ecmoRandomNumbers: gfid: FunkOut: Cool. Unfortunately, my love of geology is affected by profound claustrophobia.

Carslbad is big inside - at least most of the areas on the general tours are.  I don't know how bad your claustrophobia is, but I'd be willing to bet the rooms in your home are much much smaller by comparison.

But the rooms in your home are not under millions of tons of magically suspended rock. That's where a lot of the panic comes from.

Magically suspended?
I take it you are not a geologist, an engineer, or have any sort of career that requires critical thought.
Have you ever ridden a subway or driven through a tunnel.  Did you think that those were created by magicians?

And if your house roof suddenly collapses that will kill you just as easily as hundreds of feet of rock.  Humans are somewhat fragile to just a few hundred pounds of weight coming down on us.


*whoosh*

Do you find your Asperger's completely socially crippling?

Let me type slowly so you can understand:

Part of what makes people panic in situations like in caves is the thought of all that rock coming down on top of them. Logic has nothing to do with phobias, as you can't reason a phobia away. And by the way, I'm not claustrophobic. I was trying to illustrate the mindset of somebody with that particular fear.
 
2013-11-16 02:14:23 PM
I just looked outside and discovered a bigger area than that.

So there.
 
2013-11-16 02:31:43 PM
It's interesting to look at that picture and realize that it's the first time that light has ever shone there, the first time a human has seen it.
 
2013-11-16 02:49:13 PM

ecmoRandomNumbers: GoldDude: ecmoRandomNumbers: gfid: FunkOut: Cool. Unfortunately, my love of geology is affected by profound claustrophobia.

Carslbad is big inside - at least most of the areas on the general tours are.  I don't know how bad your claustrophobia is, but I'd be willing to bet the rooms in your home are much much smaller by comparison.

But the rooms in your home are not under millions of tons of magically suspended rock. That's where a lot of the panic comes from.

Magically suspended?
I take it you are not a geologist, an engineer, or have any sort of career that requires critical thought.
Have you ever ridden a subway or driven through a tunnel.  Did you think that those were created by magicians?

And if your house roof suddenly collapses that will kill you just as easily as hundreds of feet of rock.  Humans are somewhat fragile to just a few hundred pounds of weight coming down on us.

*whoosh*

Do you find your Asperger's completely socially crippling?

Let me type slowly so you can understand:

Part of what makes people panic in situations like in caves is the thought of all that rock coming down on top of them. Logic has nothing to do with phobias, as you can't reason a phobia away. And by the way, I'm not claustrophobic. I was trying to illustrate the mindset of somebody with that particular fear.


Okay let's break down your response:
First you suggest my light-hearted anal-retentive comment is indicative of me having Asperger Syndrome - a very serious mental disorder which is hardly a joking manner.
Then in the latter part of your comment you further suggest that I am insensitive and not understanding of phobias such as claustrophobia.
Hmmmm, let's see... Asperger's vs Claustrophobia.
Whoosh yourself.
 
2013-11-16 03:09:02 PM
i.imgur.com
Introitus?
 
2013-11-16 03:23:34 PM
Giving out people's Twitter handle is the new thing, but giving out the guy's phone number at the end of the news piece?  hmm.
 
2013-11-16 03:28:13 PM
Watch out for feral ghouls and super mutants!!!!
 
2013-11-16 03:28:43 PM

CreamFilling: ecmoRandomNumbers: gfid: FunkOut: Cool. Unfortunately, my love of geology is affected by profound claustrophobia.

Carslbad is big inside - at least most of the areas on the general tours are.  I don't know how bad your claustrophobia is, but I'd be willing to bet the rooms in your home are much much smaller by comparison.

But the rooms in your home are not under millions of tons of magically suspended rock. That's where a lot of the panic comes from.

Sure, but the ceiling of your house is just held there by tiny metal spikes in slowly rotting pieces of wood, put there by the immigrant labor willing to work for the lowest price that day.


This is why I favour yurts.

Actually, my issue is not getting access to fresh air and open sky quickly. I have a problem with elevators and tall buildings and being stuck in the back of a two door car. Cannot escape fast enough.

Never would have gotten through the mines of Moria.
 
2013-11-16 03:31:29 PM
I was part of a group that "discovered" a new region in Carlsbad back in the 80s. Was small but pretty for a cave. Still cool and still got an award from the state.
 
2013-11-16 04:12:47 PM
We stopped by Carlsbad a few years back.

We were on the first elevator down, and then apparantly the elevator malfunctioned after we got off.

We effectively had the entire cavern to ourselves for two and a half hours, just the four of us and a Japanese family we we only encountered once or twice.

Was really nice.
 
2013-11-16 04:22:54 PM

CreamFilling: ecmoRandomNumbers: gfid: FunkOut: Cool. Unfortunately, my love of geology is affected by profound claustrophobia.

Carslbad is big inside - at least most of the areas on the general tours are.  I don't know how bad your claustrophobia is, but I'd be willing to bet the rooms in your home are much much smaller by comparison.

But the rooms in your home are not under millions of tons of magically suspended rock. That's where a lot of the panic comes from.

Sure, but the ceiling of your house is just held there by tiny metal spikes in slowly rotting pieces of wood, put there by the immigrant labor willing to work for the lowest price that day.


I'm afraid that my house will collapse and cause the cave under it to collapse. That would be the worst thing ever. Maybe living on a boat would be the best thing but a maelstrom could suck it down and besides a meteorite or narwhal could poke a hole in it which might not be that bad if I could get out and float with a life jacket but them there's hypothermia to consider, not to mention sharks and/or various deadly jellyfish.
 
2013-11-16 05:48:05 PM
Be sure to bring plenty of torches. You don't want a creeper sneaking up on you while you're exploring.

/and if you ruin into a talking turtle that lives inside a tree you can tell him to get his own damn aspirin next time
 
2013-11-16 06:58:37 PM

CreamFilling: ecmoRandomNumbers: gfid: FunkOut: Cool. Unfortunately, my love of geology is affected by profound claustrophobia.

Carslbad is big inside - at least most of the areas on the general tours are.  I don't know how bad your claustrophobia is, but I'd be willing to bet the rooms in your home are much much smaller by comparison.

But the rooms in your home are not under millions of tons of magically suspended rock. That's where a lot of the panic comes from.

Sure, but the ceiling of your house is just held there by tiny metal spikes in slowly rotting pieces of wood, put there by the immigrant labor willing to work for the lowest price that day.


And this is how I now define evil. Nice work.
 
2013-11-16 07:19:36 PM

Pointy Tail of Satan: Watch out for feral ghouls and super mutants!!!!


Also watch out for this guy
furiousfanboys.com
 
2013-11-16 07:43:07 PM

Abox: But enough about your mom's veeg.


That's the Fark I know and love.
 
2013-11-16 07:49:01 PM
And definitely watch out for these dudes.

i.imgur.com
 
2013-11-16 08:49:17 PM
Caving's cool and all but... cave diving's where it's really at. Especially if you're in mexico and have a french dive guide and are totally unqualified for it.

farking loved diving the cenotes :)
 
2013-11-16 09:08:17 PM

Nogale: They had a chance to use the word "spelunking" and passed? Psshh.


Apparently, "serious" spelunkers like to be called "cavers". Which is funny, because it's the equivalent of astronauts calling themselves "spacers".

/also, "to cave", when referring to people, has traditionally meant "to yield; submit; surrender"
 
2013-11-16 09:55:11 PM

ArcadianRefugee: Nogale: They had a chance to use the word "spelunking" and passed? Psshh.

Apparently, "serious" spelunkers like to be called "cavers". Which is funny, because it's the equivalent of astronauts calling themselves "spacers".

/also, "to cave", when referring to people, has traditionally meant "to yield; submit; surrender"


But 'spelunking' is a dumb sounding word and nobody outside the US would know what you're talking about.

So there's that.
 
2013-11-16 10:25:22 PM
Discovered....when subby's mom uncrossed her legs.

/for the fark of it
 
2013-11-16 11:21:02 PM

Gothnet: ArcadianRefugee: Nogale: They had a chance to use the word "spelunking" and passed? Psshh.

Apparently, "serious" spelunkers like to be called "cavers". Which is funny, because it's the equivalent of astronauts calling themselves "spacers".

/also, "to cave", when referring to people, has traditionally meant "to yield; submit; surrender"

But 'spelunking' is a dumb sounding word and nobody outside the US would know what you're talking about.

So there's that.


Because "caving" sounds so much smarter? Giving up, collapsing: that's what I associate with "caving".

And the last thing I want to think about when exploring a cave is having the damn thing collapse.
 
2013-11-17 12:03:53 AM

ArcadianRefugee: Gothnet: ArcadianRefugee: Nogale: They had a chance to use the word "spelunking" and passed? Psshh.

Apparently, "serious" spelunkers like to be called "cavers". Which is funny, because it's the equivalent of astronauts calling themselves "spacers".

/also, "to cave", when referring to people, has traditionally meant "to yield; submit; surrender"

But 'spelunking' is a dumb sounding word and nobody outside the US would know what you're talking about.

So there's that.

Because "caving" sounds so much smarter? Giving up, collapsing: that's what I associate with "caving".

And the last thing I want to think about when exploring a cave is having the damn thing collapse.


"Speleological field observation" might make everyone happy.
 
2013-11-17 11:01:47 AM
 I like the turtle reference. Too bad nobody else seemed to catch it.


DigitalCoffee: Be sure to bring plenty of torches. You don't want a creeper sneaking up on you while you're exploring.

/and if you ruin into a talking turtle that lives inside a tree you can tell him to get his own damn aspirin next time

 
2013-11-17 12:29:31 PM
"(Caves are) a never-ending thing," she added. "Basically, the last frontier to discover."

No need to go back to space or the bottom of the oceans, folks. That's already been done and taken care of.
 
2013-11-17 03:06:18 PM
Is Ted the Caver finally going to update us?
 
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