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(C|Net)   You may think being smart enough to use a touchscreen device is one reason you bought a Samsung, but Samsung's lawyers politely contend that you're a semi-evolved simian   (news.cnet.com) divider line 15
    More: Strange, Samsung, Koh, 4G LTE, touch screens, AMOLED, patent infringements  
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1660 clicks; posted to Business » on 16 Nov 2013 at 10:33 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



15 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-11-16 08:15:24 AM  
Ironic headline, considering touchscreens are an inferior UI system designed to utilize precisely none of our evolutionary adaptations.
 
2013-11-16 09:51:59 AM  
You might also think that the patent office would know the meaning of the word "obvious", before handing out exclusive rights to dreck like this.

dookdookdook: Ironic headline, considering touchscreens are an inferior UI system designed to utilize precisely none of our evolutionary adaptations.


So you don't have any fingers then?
 
2013-11-16 11:05:33 AM  
Does anyone else think it's kind of ridiculous that you can patent a UI feature like that? Isn't this why various organizations try to create standards so that we don't get crazy, competing methods of doing, well standard stuff?

Once you "pinch to zoom" one time it's fairly clear that that was the obvious way to do zooming on a touch screen panel. Why does every other company have to pay the original idea millions of dollars, possibly every year, just for that one method?
 
2013-11-16 11:27:01 AM  
Oh, go bang your heads together, four-eyes.
 
2013-11-16 11:27:14 AM  

WhackingDay: Does anyone else think it's kind of ridiculous that you can patent a UI feature like that? Isn't this why various organizations try to create standards so that we don't get crazy, competing methods of doing, well standard stuff?

Once you "pinch to zoom" one time it's fairly clear that that was the obvious way to do zooming on a touch screen panel. Why does every other company have to pay the original idea millions of dollars, possibly every year, just for that one method?


If the rewards were for what this invention was actually "worth", based on how much "work" it took to figure it out (in this case about 5 minutes) then patent lawyers couldn't fight over it in court and collect millions in fees.
 
2013-11-16 12:37:22 PM  

WhackingDay: Does anyone else think it's kind of ridiculous that you can patent a UI feature like that? Isn't this why various organizations try to create standards so that we don't get crazy, competing methods of doing, well standard stuff?

Once you "pinch to zoom" one time it's fairly clear that that was the obvious way to do zooming on a touch screen panel. Why does every other company have to pay the original idea millions of dollars, possibly every year, just for that one method?


Pretty sure autocad was the one who came up with it anyway. Click two points and the screen will zoom to fit.
 
2013-11-16 12:47:10 PM  

dookdookdook: Ironic headline, considering touchscreens are an inferior UI system designed to utilize precisely none of our evolutionary adaptations.


Oh, this guy. That article is an answer looking for a question.

Smartphones are tools for your brain, not your hands.
 
2013-11-16 12:49:07 PM  
I pinch-to-zoom maybe five times a year, even on my phone.  I don't think I'd miss it if Apple's lawyers managed to get it removed from every phone that doesn't start with "i"

Off the top of my head, I could think of a half dozen easier (or at least different) methods:
1. Diagonal bottom-left-to-upper-right to zoom in, opposite way to zoom out
2. Clockwise circles to zoom in.  Widdershins to zoom out.
3. Dedicated left-to-right touch sensitive bar at bottom of display (i.e. beneath bezel/display area).  Swipe one way to zoom in, the other way to zoom out.  Bonus: Two finger swipe to move time pointer forward/back, three finger swipe L2R or R2L for "next/previous song/video/etc," single finger stationary, other finger moves L or R to FF or RW.
4. Accelerometer tracking.  Push phone away to zoom out, push in to zoom in.
5. Eye/head tracking.  Focus intently on the area you want to zoom in on, the phone/display will show an outline of the proposed zoom area.  Move head down while maintaining eye contact on outline to zoom in, up to zoom out.
6. Non-touching finger tracking.  Two-finger long (2sec) hover about an inch above display initiates zoom/pan operation.  Moving fingers in and out zooms in.  Moving fingers across plane of display pans image so that the point above the fingers when the zoom/pan operation began stays centered beneath fingers.  Bonus: One-finger long hover initiates pan-only operation.

All of these are PAINFULLY obvious methods of doing the same thing.  The sad thing is that all Apple managed to do is pick one that's even more obvious than the ones I could come up with in five minutes of brainstorming.

I release all of the above freely into the aether, to whomever wants them as evidence of prior art when some asshat also comes up with the same stupidly obvious ideas and wants to patent them.
 
2013-11-16 01:10:04 PM  

WhackingDay: Does anyone else think it's kind of ridiculous that you can patent a UI feature like that? Isn't this why various organizations try to create standards so that we don't get crazy, competing methods of doing, well standard stuff?

Once you "pinch to zoom" one time it's fairly clear that that was the obvious way to do zooming on a touch screen panel. Why does every other company have to pay the original idea millions of dollars, possibly every year, just for that one method?


Yes. It is ridiculous.

Why? Because money.
 
2013-11-16 01:24:39 PM  

dookdookdook: Ironic headline, considering touchscreens are an inferior UI system designed to utilize precisely none of our evolutionary adaptations.


Great article, but i think that manipulating pictures under glass works pretty well.

Some sort of tactile feedback would be nice. But I think the key word is "pictures," not "glass," since that is what is being manipulated.
 
2013-11-16 05:22:08 PM  

tillerman35: I pinch-to-zoom maybe five times a year, even on my phone.  I don't think I'd miss it if Apple's lawyers managed to get it removed from every phone that doesn't start with "i"


I like the double tap zoom that Google Maps and Chrome use.  Much easier to do one handed
 
2013-11-16 09:08:17 PM  

tillerman35: 2. Clockwise circles to zoom in. Widdershins to zoom out.


That's a new word to me, and I like it. I'll never use it, but I like it.
 
2013-11-17 12:17:41 AM  

WhackingDay: Does anyone else think it's kind of ridiculous that you can patent a UI feature like that? Isn't this why various organizations try to create standards so that we don't get crazy, competing methods of doing, well standard stuff?

Once you "pinch to zoom" one time it's fairly clear that that was the obvious way to do zooming on a touch screen panel. Why does every other company have to pay the original idea millions of dollars, possibly every year, just for that one method?


Pinch zoom and twist tilt are so obvious that one would think the purpose for designing the multitouch input hardware device was to implement it, rather than someone said "Here - we made a multitouch input for no reason.  Figure out what to do with it."
 
2013-11-17 01:03:30 AM  
They can just switch to an interface that reacts to bodily noises. Burp to zoom in, fart to zoom out, cough to bring up search, etc.
 
2013-11-17 01:21:19 PM  
I say burn the whole farking patent office to the ground. That place is run by Luddites, monkeys and lawyers.

/with apologies to all monkeys in the thread.
 
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