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(The Atlantic)   If your doctor asks "What's your sign?" he or she isn't trying to hit on you; new studies indicate that your birth month can determine what maladies you may be struck with   (theatlantic.com) divider line 17
    More: PSA, philosophy of science, life chances, Hippocrates, social behavior, developmental disorder, developed country, births, sleep disorders  
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7665 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Nov 2013 at 9:06 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2013-11-16 07:13:37 AM  
7 votes:
Clever, subby, but if my doctor asked me my sign, I'd know he was an idiot, since my exact birth day is on a chart right there in front of him.
2013-11-16 03:08:56 AM  
7 votes:
bullshiat
2013-11-16 12:00:47 PM  
2 votes:
So I read the article and aside from a bunch of astrology stuff the author stuck in supposing this and that, the main body is that researchers noticed that there are statistically higher numbers of people with certain ailments born in a certain season. Not in a certain astrology sign but a season such as spring, summer, fall, winter.

So a bunch of other people read the article, see the word "astrology" and dismiss the entire thing as bullshiat when the actual research said nothing about astrology, only seasons. Things like "People born in March/April/May have a higher incidence of mental illness compared to those born in September/October".

Some may be dismayed that 1 in 4 Americans beleive in astrology. I'm dismayed most people have no reading comprehension.
2013-11-16 10:05:01 AM  
2 votes:

Mr. Eugenides: Bucky Katt: bullshiat

You don't think that gestational conditions caused by temperature changes can impact development?  Particularly epi-genetically?  The "climate" experienced by expectant women today is vastly different with it was a thousand years ago, but being 7+ months pregnant in August still sucks.


I think that has jack shiat to do with Astrology, personally, and that it's just another example of woo beliefs trying to hijack scientific study and concepts to continue to justify their existence.
2013-11-16 09:13:46 AM  
2 votes:
"Hippocrates, whose namesake oath is, to this day, still sworn to by all who enter the field, has been attributed to the saying "a physician without knowledge of astrology has no right to call himself a physician."

Hippocrates also believed in humorism and probably contributed significantly to many of his patients deaths.
2013-11-16 09:09:41 AM  
2 votes:
Quackery
2013-11-16 12:03:11 AM  
2 votes:
"I'm a Cancer."
"You're farked."
2013-11-16 12:29:25 PM  
1 votes:

Voiceofreason01: FunkOut: So I read the article and aside from a bunch of astrology stuff the author stuck in supposing this and that, the main body is that researchers noticed that there are statistically higher numbers of people with certain ailments born in a certain season. Not in a certain astrology sign but a season such as spring, summer, fall, winter.

So a bunch of other people read the article, see the word "astrology" and dismiss the entire thing as bullshiat when the actual research said nothing about astrology, only seasons. Things like "People born in March/April/May have a higher incidence of mental illness compared to those born in September/October".

The article is about astrology and the author(Elijah Wolfson) makes a bunch of misleading(and a few outright false) statements about science and astrology. I'll admit that I didn't finish the article but the first study that is linked in the article isn't even about what Wolfson claims it's about, even going so far as to use a quote from the study out of context to say something that was never intended by the author of the study. Whether or not the research in the studies cited here are any good is irrelevant since Wolfson doesn't honestly or accurately represent what they say in making his point.


I've read the research before about season affecting fetuses and health. I'd like to see research into comparison between countries close to the poles and countries on the equator. Finland versus Ecuador.

It's typical web journalism to spin a bit of information with a bunch of crap or opinions to make content. About as annoying as slideshows.
2013-11-16 11:13:14 AM  
1 votes:

Peki: Not surprised. The ancients knew not to look at an eclipse either, they just thought it was because it was incest between the gods.

/ancients had thousands of years to observe patterns and links. They may not have known why, but I'm willing to give them the benefit sometimes


The scientific method is the gold standard.  Astrology fails when tested.  Every.  Single.  Time.  It's because it's just systematic bollocks.
2013-11-16 10:13:50 AM  
1 votes:
Since I was born in September in the northern hemisphere, I'm obviously immortal. That's what I'm taking away from this article. Go me!!!
2013-11-16 09:57:00 AM  
1 votes:

optimistic_cynic: Yeah this is bullshiat because it's not possible that a gestating fetus may develop differently depending on the gravity at the time or the amount of vitamins the mother can produce based on sun exposure. Yup complete and utter bullshiat.


No, it really is bullshiat. It's the astrology community desperately grabbing onto straws and trying to remain relevant in an age where people really don't care at large about them anymore

If you want to know how "interesting" this topic is to the medical community, there are only 7 results on a PubMed search for astrology. I linked two of them. The others are either medical historical manuscripts or writings from Indian alternative med journals..
2013-11-16 09:51:09 AM  
1 votes:
Yeah this is bullshiat because it's not possible that a gestating fetus may develop differently depending on the gravity at the time or the amount of vitamins the mother can produce based on sun exposure. Yup complete and utter bullshiat.
2013-11-16 09:39:20 AM  
1 votes:

HotIgneous Intruder: I'll betcha there's a tailored homeopathic remedy for each month, too, RIGHT?

/Gawd people are superstitious idiots.


Hey, say what you want, but homeopathy is an effective treatment for dehydration. :)
2013-11-16 09:34:39 AM  
1 votes:
I bet the subby/author is a Libra.
2013-11-16 09:28:25 AM  
1 votes:
Scientifically disproven thousands of times in every double blind study ever performed
2013-11-16 09:27:15 AM  
1 votes:
"Can modern medicine actually learn from stars and seasonality?"

No.

/there, I just saved you over 1600 words of utter bullshiat
2013-11-16 07:53:06 AM  
1 votes:
Idiots.  Everyone knows that you should only seek help from a fully qualified and AMA approved tea leaf reader.
 
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