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(CBS Los Angeles 2)   LA Police: "Hey, this TSA agent still has a pulse. Let's let him bleed out for over a half an hour so we can bump these charges up to a murder rap"   (losangeles.cbslocal.com) divider line 155
    More: Dumbass, TSA, Los Angeles, TSA agents, U.S. state abbreviations, Los Angeles Police Department, trauma surgeon, Los Angeles Fire Department, old paul  
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14948 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Nov 2013 at 7:34 PM (49 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-11-15 09:53:48 PM  
Exactly what do people think the TSA is looking for? I'll tell you - crazy people with weapons. What do they do when they actually find one? Scatter like they never knew it would happen. Idiots.
 
2013-11-15 09:58:57 PM  
The inconsistent patchwork of local law enforcement and security protocols simply won't get the job done. We need a dedicated TSA law enforcement unit tasked with protecting transportation security officers and the flying public around our vulnerable screening areas.

Sigh.

That stretching sound you hear is the ever expanding government. budget and all.
 
2013-11-15 09:59:05 PM  
Way to f*ck up a slam dunk arrest and conviction LAPD. You can't get the shooter on anything related to that agent's death now.
 
2013-11-15 10:15:24 PM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: I don't remember anyone at the airport fondling my nutsack pre-9/11 or using advanced technology to see me naked.


Pre-911 I had a friend get on the luggage belt at the San Jose Air Port and ride it into the handling area and back out.
 
2013-11-15 10:18:39 PM  

Surool: Way to f*ck up a slam dunk arrest and conviction LAPD. You can't get the shooter on anything related to that agent's death now.


Curious about your logic on that? The fact is he died as a direct result of the injuries inflicted by the gunshot, regardless of the interventions of others or lack thereof.

itsaidwhat: What do they do when they actually find one? Scatter like they never knew it would happen. Idiots.


The majority of the TSA are unarmed security screeners. They are not law enforcement. The average TSA screener has less training than the rent a cop that guards your local bank.
 
2013-11-15 10:28:03 PM  
Surcool

Way to f*ck up a slam dunk arrest and conviction LAPD. You can't get the shooter on anything related to that agent's death now.

Did you have to say that on the Internet?
 
2013-11-15 10:28:04 PM  

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: I don't get the hate for the TSA. In my experience the vast majority of the agents are polite and respectful and the entire proces isn't much worse than it was pre-9/11.


So long as you do nothing to draw scrutiny it's about the same.

When my wife drew a patdown that edged into sexual assault territory because the x-ray couldn't resolve an object in her carryon there's a problem.

My wife is from China and we visit on occasion so I get to see how their security works also--and it's a big difference!

1)  You say they're polite--I've seen a *LOT* more politeness from the Chinese agents.  They approach anomalies from a standpoint of attempting to confirm they're harmless rather than thinking they caught something.

2)  The only going-through-the-motions security I have seen over there has been imposed by the TSA, not the Chinese authorities.  Here I often have the feeling they're obsessed with rules rather than results.

3)  The Chinese are much better at reacting to reality than the US.  After the underwear bomber they quickly had a procedure in effect where they grouped half a dozen people and rubbed one swab on everyone (clothes, bags, not skin--no hazard) and then put it in the ETD.  Simple, effective, quick to implement but no big bucks for a supplier.

4)  My wife set off two nuke alarms over there.  At 4x and 8x the radioactivity she didn't set off any in the US portion of the flight.  (Although I did find their followup inadequate.  The card from the lab sat in the pocket of the jacket she didn't wear for the flight but even then they simply took her word on the situation and made no attempt to determine if it was her or her possessions that were hot.)

5)  They *NEVER* mess with your luggage--no sticky-fingered TSA agents or bags not properly repacked.  If there's an issue on the x-ray they ask you about what it might be and confirm that really is what you claim.  The x-ray tech is shown the item(s) in question, if they're not sure that that's what they saw the bag is run through again without them, but the only stuff they actually handle is the offending item(s).  The US--an agent helped themselves to a bag of nuts in our checked bags.

6)  They pay more attention to the scanner.  I had an opaque item in my carryon, they pointed to the shadow on the screen and asked me about it, I pulled it out for examination.  The same item 12 hours later went unnoticed.  Likewise, the metal chopsticks were noticed over there, missed here.

7)  Here the layout is such that you can't keep an eye on your belongings once you send them through the x-ray.  (Although at least the TSA guys understand when I explain I'm waiting for my wife to be in a position to watch before I send our stuff through.)  Over there it's a non-issue, I would be able to see someone making off with something of mine and I'm sure that "Stop that thief!!" would get my bag back.

arentol: Personally I think paramedics should be allowed to be armed and that any of them who don't do so once it is allowed is an idiot. But that is just my opinion and not that relevant to the core issues with your argument...


Armed paramedics strike me as a *VERY* bad idea.  You want to bring weapons around someone who might be acting irrationally?  Ensuring a patient doesn't grab that gun is going to interfere with them doing their job in an emergency.
 
2013-11-15 10:38:11 PM  

Loren: My wife is from China and we visit on occasion so I get to see how their security works also--and it's a big difference!


I haven't been to China, but I did go to Singapore. They were more as you described, aka effective. It felt ironic to me that the "Police State" of Singapore was less intrusive than LAX.
 
2013-11-15 11:04:39 PM  
I assume the dumbass tag is for subby and his headline.
 
2013-11-15 11:07:05 PM  

Bit'O'Gristle: First of all, its not a policeman's job to administer first aid, its their job in a situation as this, to secure the area, and that takes time. They have guns, and are able to defend themselves. The paramedics do not. So, you don't let in the medical people until you have made sure it is safe. No point adding more victims to a already bad situation. It has been this way forever, and as a retired police officer, it makes sense to me. No point in letting others in, before you had taken control of the situation, and made sure it is safe. But i guess that doesn't matter to the trolltastic headline.
If we had let them in to help the guy, and the shooter (or shooters, they didn't know) shot the paramedics, the trolls would have been screaming "why didnt you make sure it was safe? Waaahhhhhhhh." Can't win, so you do what makes sense and hope for the best.


So, with all the police and other TSA officers all in there - not ONE of them could take that guy out to where it was safe?

Police officers in my family say it was not always like this.  But they are pretty old by now.
 
2013-11-15 11:08:23 PM  

epyonyx: Firat thing cops are trained to do is protect themselves. Number 2 is civilians. Third is help wounded. Number one was not done. It sucks. We all hate including cops, but they followed protocols. Plain and simple, it sucks and was a shiatty situation.


Isn't there some rule where they don't pronounce people dead when they're not?  Is making medical pronouncements part of protecting themselves?
 
2013-11-15 11:09:13 PM  

fnordfocus: Princess Ryans Knickers: Remind me again what your opinion would be if you had found out that was your loved one that they let bleed out?

That wouldn't happen.  If an Officer's loved one was shot, they would have received prompt treatment.


Yep, yep.
 
2013-11-15 11:14:47 PM  
We discussed this incident during a training class I had today. The LAPD had secured the scene and neutralized the shooter, then asked the LAFD to enter the scene to treat the injured agent. They refused, even after being told the shooter was neutralized. The LAPD treated the guy for almost 30 minutes but were afraid to move him for fear of aggravating his injuries. The cops had no equipment to stabilize the guy. The cops finally got frustrated and wheeled the guy out in a wheelchair to the ambulance. He was never treated by LAFD who were only 150 yards away the entire time.

This was very similar to the occurrence at the Aurora theater shooting. The cops were practically begging the fire department to come into the scene, but they refused unless they were assured it was safe. Obviously the cops couldn't give that assurance. The cops finally started transporting people themselves out of frustration.

Fire departments have set protocols for each situation, and it takes them way too long to set up a rescue plan in active shooter type scenarios. The entire point of the class was to train the cops in working with the fire department to remove victims in active shooter cases.
 
2013-11-15 11:26:58 PM  

Flint Ironstag: Pichu0102: It's not known when Hernandez died or if immediate medical attention could have saved his life, but McClain said unless a person is decapitated, a doctor must declare someone dead.

What.

I did a first aid course and that was one of the key things we were taught. We were not allowed to decide the victim was dead. We must administer CPR or whatever until an ambulance arrives and the pro's take over, no matter how dead the victim might appear. Only if the victim was in one place and their head was somewhere else could we safely decide not to bother.

/TV is partly to blame. CPR is a miracle cure where after ten seconds the victim takes a huge breath and springs back to life. People see that so often on TV and in movies that if someone does have a heart attack they give up after twenty seconds because "it hasn't worked". People have made full recoveries after being given CPR, and remained non responsive, for half an hour and more.
//You do not make that call. You administer first aid until medics arrive and take over or decomposition starts.


Oh, okay, I was thinking it worded like saying if you're not decapitated, a doctor must say you are dead. I was a little confused there for a moment.
 
2013-11-15 11:38:10 PM  
I smell a lawsuit....better call Saul!
 
2013-11-15 11:45:10 PM  

N4LG4s: I smell a lawsuit....better call Saul!


You'll need to use this.
 
2013-11-15 11:49:40 PM  
I just came here for the law enforcement weeners tactical casualty care.
 
2013-11-15 11:52:59 PM  

doglover: change1211: Gig103: [img.fark.net image 604x358]

Yep, a father and husband is dead. This is a good thing because Fark doesn't like who he worked for.

To be fair, NOBODY likes the TSA and even The Iceman was married with kids.

[southparkstudios.mtvnimages.com image 480x350]
It's still a crying shame the LAPD gets to continue existing as they do without major reform from an external source higher up the food chain. They are constantly farking up like this.


Somehow, in a contest of "who I'd fear least in a locked room" I'd have to go with the TSA on this one. Since they aren't allowed sidearms, and LAPD would leave you full of lead and claim you fell down the (nonexistent) stairs during an otherwise lawful arrest.
 
2013-11-16 12:03:18 AM  

CruiserTwelve: We discussed this incident during a training class I had today. The LAPD had secured the scene and neutralized the shooter, then asked the LAFD to enter the scene to treat the injured agent. They refused, even after being told the shooter was neutralized. The LAPD treated the guy for almost 30 minutes but were afraid to move him for fear of aggravating his injuries. The cops had no equipment to stabilize the guy. The cops finally got frustrated and wheeled the guy out in a wheelchair to the ambulance. He was never treated by LAFD who were only 150 yards away the entire time.


Nice story, but it isn't consistent with the article or with the fact that LAFD was able to treat the shooter.

This is all about a Heroic LAPD Officer exceeding his authority to declare someone dead who wasn't yet.

Unless you're able to provide some source, this sounds like random CYA LEO story-telling.
 
2013-11-16 12:05:21 AM  
corq:Somehow, in a contest of "who I'd fear least in a locked room" I'd have to go with the TSA on this one. Since they aren't allowed sidearms

Are you sure?

Probably not guns, but I'm convinced I've seen TSOs with batons or OC.
 
2013-11-16 12:13:32 AM  

fnordfocus: hardinparamedic: fnordfocus: Then explain the 28 minutes between when the shooter was neutralized, and provided with medical care himself, before y'all allowed the victim any treatment?

I already did.

You wrote:

That said, in reality tactical doctrine is to bypass giving aid to wounded and go directly towards the active shooter to isolate and neutralize him. Until that's done, in the absence of a tactical paramedic team, the priority is stopping the shooting and THEN treating victims.

How the fark does that explain this situation?  The Officers had already neutralized the shooter.  They thought it was safe enough to aid wounded shooter.  They didn't allow the victim to be treated.  How does that make any farking sense?


Apparently when an airport security checkpoint is breached, we assume the airport has been taken over by a large group of terrorists who staged the checkpoint incident merely as a distraction to cover their bigger plan. Until the entire area is searched and locked down, the terminal is assumed to be crawling with armed terrorists.
 
2013-11-16 12:16:08 AM  

arentol: hardinparamedic: Pichu0102: It's not known when Hernandez died or if immediate medical attention could have saved his life, but McClain said unless a person is decapitated, a doctor must declare someone dead.

What.

The doctor has to sign the death certificate. A Paramedic or RN can declare someone dead when they meet criteria in their Guidelines/Standing Orders.

Don't expect the news media to get it right. They have to sensationalize.

PanicMan: Okay, this was a giant clusterf*ck, but really saying someone is "only" 150 yards away when it's unknown if there's other shooters, or bombs.  If you go out to help someone and you get shot too, now there's two victims and less people to respond or secure the area.

THIS.

Unless you have someone who is a Paramedic or EMT on a tactical team and is trained to operate under fire, or you have a spare Law Enforcement officer trained in LE Weeners Tactical Casuality Care,you're not going to care for them until the shooter is neutralized.

Remember that scene from ROTLD, where he says "Send more paramedics?" That's what active shooters want. Unarmed rescuers they can add to their body count. Kill the shooter, save lives.

Personally I think paramedics should be allowed to be armed and that any of them who don't do so once it is allowed is an idiot. But that is just my opinion and not that relevant to the core issues with your argument...

RTFA.... The shooter was neutralized 28 minutes before the guy was moved the 20 feet to the paramedics.

1.) At 150 yards range 20 feet is NOTHING. Moving the paramedics up 20 feet, from 157 yards away to 150 yards away was never going to make a difference to their safety. Conversely, if the location of the injured man was dangerous then the paramedics being only 20 feet away were already in danger. Either way you cut it letting them move up 20 feet would have no impact on their safety.

2.) The paramedics were never allowed in anyway... The police moved the man TO the paramedics. There is no ...


It makes a HUGE difference if their last point of cover was 150 yards away, and moving 20 feet closer would have exposed them to a scene that was not yet completely secured.
 
2013-11-16 12:33:50 AM  
Bit'O'Gristle:
You know that LA SWAT has officers cross-trained as Paramedics, right? Or that they could drag the downed man to a safe area and evacuate him?
 
2013-11-16 12:51:50 AM  

fnordfocus: Nice story, but it isn't consistent with the article or with the fact that LAFD was able to treat the shooter.

This is all about a Heroic LAPD Officer exceeding his authority to declare someone dead who wasn't yet.

Unless you're able to provide some source, this sounds like random CYA LEO story-telling.


You're correct in saying that the article differs significantly from what I heard in class. However, it doesn't explain why LAFD didn't enter the scene to treat the victim. I'm sure paramedics aren't going to take the word of a cop that their patient is dead. What we were told is that LAFD would not enter the scene, even after being told the shooter was neutralized. Maybe the instructors were just trying to emphasize the importance of working WITH the fire department to get people treated because that was the entire point of the class. Or maybe they were full of shiat.

Yeah, from the article it looks like the cops should have moved the guy outdoors much sooner, and maybe the dumbass cop that kept saying he was dead delayed that. I've never heard of a fire department accepting the word of a cop that a patient was dead, but I have personal experience with fire/rescue personnel refusing to enter a scene. In fact on several occasions that come to mind.
 
2013-11-16 01:25:18 AM  
It's a dirty lie. There's no such thing as a TSA agent with a pulse.
 
2013-11-16 02:22:20 AM  

mllawso: You know that LA SWAT has officers cross-trained as Paramedics, right? Or that they could drag the downed man to a safe area and evacuate him


Do you have a source stating that there was a tactical paramedic on scene or in the terminal at the time that occured? Because that would be an even bigger foul-up than this already is.
 
2013-11-16 02:38:14 AM  
It's the police state.  Common sense is trumped by AUTHORATAY! Like when that firefighter was arrested by the cop because the firefighter was more concerned with safety than the cops AUTHORATAY!

WHO'S IN CHARGE HERE?!!

Is Fark.com authorized to post this article?
 
2013-11-16 03:00:48 AM  

regindyn: Hernandez? No wonder they let him die.


I know, right?  If there's one thing you'll never see in the LAPD, it's a Hispanic police officer...
 
2013-11-16 03:24:30 AM  

hardinparamedic: The average TSA screener has less training than the rent a cop that guards your local bank.


Well yeah, a bank guards pay and hours are far better than nut fondling and porno scanning. In house corporate security is way way better than working the TSA.
 
2013-11-16 03:38:15 AM  

proteus_b: It's a dirty lie. There's no such thing as a TSA agent with a pulse.


That's a heart. They all have pulses. How else could they get excited to poke around in your luggage.
 
2013-11-16 03:40:51 AM  

CruiserTwelve: but I have personal experience with fire/rescue personnel refusing to enter a scene. In fact on several occasions that come to mind.


So do I.  There is nothing worse than screaming to your dispatcher that the EMTs and Fire are clear in, but they just won't come.  But it happens. A lot.
 
2013-11-16 06:02:12 AM  

hardinparamedic: Surool: Way to f*ck up a slam dunk arrest and conviction LAPD. You can't get the shooter on anything related to that agent's death now.

Curious about your logic on that? The fact is he died as a direct result of the injuries inflicted by the gunshot, regardless of the interventions of others or lack thereof.

itsaidwhat: What do they do when they actually find one? Scatter like they never knew it would happen. Idiots.

The majority of the TSA are unarmed security screeners. They are not law enforcement. The average TSA screener has less training than the rent a cop that guards your local bank.


Because you simply argue in court that the injuries would have been non fatal if the cops hadn't let him die. Doctors would have had 30 minutes to save the agent... that is a long time to bleed out. The victim died as much as a result of police action as he did from being shot. Seat the right jury. Bam.
 
2013-11-16 07:12:00 AM  
EFF that!

I'm no doc. If he's still warm and I can drag 'em out, pulse or no, I'm damn well going to.
 
2013-11-16 07:19:32 AM  

Alocksly: EFF that!

I'm no doc. If he's still warm and I can drag 'em out, pulse or no, I'm damn well going to.


You are currently working as a first responder, right?
 
2013-11-16 09:02:15 AM  

Surool: Because you simply argue in court that the injuries would have been non fatal if the cops hadn't let him die. Doctors would have had 30 minutes to save the agent... that is a long time to bleed out. The victim died as much as a result of police action as he did from being shot. Seat the right jury. Bam.


Uh, I don't think you thought your cunning defense all the way through there, Atticus Finch.
The shooter was the proximal initiator and cause of the entire situation. Had he not shot the guard in the first place, he wouldn't have died as a result of his injuries, because they would have never happened. This is the same principal why someone can be convicted of attempted murder, and then be tried for murder down the road if the victim dies in hospital within the next year.
 
2013-11-16 09:14:33 AM  
OUTRAGED:

audreys-efanfic.freeservers.com
 
2013-11-16 09:38:12 AM  

Alocksly: If he's still warm and I can drag 'em out, pulse or no, I'm damn well going to.


So if someone has a mid-line gunshot wound to the cranium with no exit, no pulse, and fixed and dilated pupils, you're going to drag them out and start CPR?

Survivors of traumatic cardiac arrest are not the norm, they're the rare exception. Neurologically intact survivors that walk out of the hospital are rarer than that. People just don't survive traumatic cardiac arrest as a rule, in the absence of rapidly correctable causes such as pneumothorax. Especially ones caused by multiple GSWs and exsanguination.
 
2013-11-16 09:57:03 AM  

doyner: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: I don't get the hate for the TSA. In my experience the vast majority of the agents are polite and respectful and the entire proces isn't much worse than it was pre-9/11.

I get the hatred for the TSA, but it doesn't hold a candle to the malfeasance of the LAPD.


I get the malfeasance of the LAPD, but the impropriety of the shooter really blows it away.
 
2013-11-16 10:07:02 AM  

Maybe you should drive: CruiserTwelve: but I have personal experience with fire/rescue personnel refusing to enter a scene. In fact on several occasions that come to mind.

So do I.  There is nothing worse than screaming to your dispatcher that the EMTs and Fire are clear in, but they just won't come.  But it happens. A lot.


Yeah, and several occasions come to mind where the cops have told me everything's cool. Only to, say, ask a psych if he has any weapons and he pulls a razor knife out of his pocket. Or to have the dispatcher tell us the "scene is secure" on the word of the caller because it's shift change and heaven forbid the cops take any calls during sacred roll call. Also, if you're "screaming" to your dispatcher you're doing it wrong.

All in all, my department and the police have a pretty good working relationship and we enter unsecure scenes fairly regularly.

In this particular case, it looks like EMS was not brought to the patient. EMS certainly may have chosen to take a small risk had they been told by the police "We have the gunman in custody and a victim RIGHT HERE, but we can't 100% guarantee the scene is secure." EMS isn't going to enter that scene searching for patients, they're going to rely on the police to locate patients. Instead, Officer Kevorkian was busy telling everyone within earshot that the TSA guy was dead and that determination stuck until an airport cop called him out on the fact that he couldn't make that decision.
 
2013-11-16 10:09:46 AM  

Maybe you should drive: CruiserTwelve: but I have personal experience with fire/rescue personnel refusing to enter a scene. In fact on several occasions that come to mind.

So do I.  There is nothing worse than screaming to your dispatcher that the EMTs and Fire are clear in, but they just won't come.  But it happens. A lot.


On the other hand, I've walked into "secure" scenes and come face to face with the business end of a double barrel shotgun.

lizyrd: Instead, Officer Kevorkian was busy telling everyone within earshot that the TSA guy was dead and that determination stuck until an airport cop called him out on the fact that he couldn't make that decision.


This looks like exactly what happened here.
 
2013-11-16 10:42:24 AM  

HideAndGoFarkYourself: arentol: hardinparamedic: Pichu0102: It's not known when Hernandez died or if immediate medical attention could have saved his life, but McClain said unless a person is decapitated, a doctor must declare someone dead.

What.

The doctor has to sign the death certificate. A Paramedic or RN can declare someone dead when they meet criteria in their Guidelines/Standing Orders.

Don't expect the news media to get it right. They have to sensationalize.

PanicMan: Okay, this was a giant clusterf*ck, but really saying someone is "only" 150 yards away when it's unknown if there's other shooters, or bombs.  If you go out to help someone and you get shot too, now there's two victims and less people to respond or secure the area.

THIS.

Unless you have someone who is a Paramedic or EMT on a tactical team and is trained to operate under fire, or you have a spare Law Enforcement officer trained in LE Weeners Tactical Casuality Care,you're not going to care for them until the shooter is neutralized.

Remember that scene from ROTLD, where he says "Send more paramedics?" That's what active shooters want. Unarmed rescuers they can add to their body count. Kill the shooter, save lives.

Personally I think paramedics should be allowed to be armed and that any of them who don't do so once it is allowed is an idiot. But that is just my opinion and not that relevant to the core issues with your argument...

RTFA.... The shooter was neutralized 28 minutes before the guy was moved the 20 feet to the paramedics.

1.) At 150 yards range 20 feet is NOTHING. Moving the paramedics up 20 feet, from 157 yards away to 150 yards away was never going to make a difference to their safety. Conversely, if the location of the injured man was dangerous then the paramedics being only 20 feet away were already in danger. Either way you cut it letting them move up 20 feet would have no impact on their safety.

2.) The paramedics were never allowed in anyway... The police moved the man TO the paramedics. The ...


Listen Dude, 150 yards is a whole lot of cover all by itself. Damn few amateurs could get lucky at that range.

This was chickenchit failure to function. That is all.
 
2013-11-16 11:31:21 AM  
Joseph Wambaugh wrote a good cop tail about how a racist officer found a known black criminal with several bullet holes in him, still alive.  So he dutifully used CPR on him, pumping him dry.
 
2013-11-16 12:16:12 PM  

gibbon1: hardinparamedic: The average TSA screener has less training than the rent a cop that guards your local bank.

Well yeah, a bank guards pay and hours are far better than nut fondling and porno scanning. In house corporate security is way way better than working the TSA.


Yeah but private security firms screen their employees. I am not sure that all of the TSA agents in have encountered can even read. The few that can get put on ID checks.
 
2013-11-16 01:07:08 PM  

hardinparamedic: Do you have a source stating that there was a tactical paramedic on scene or in the terminal at the time that occured?


Ah, I may be mistaken. Apparently SRT "medics" just have to be EMT-Bs, although some do go the extra mile for the -P. Still, tactical medic's aren't rare anymore, and I know that LA has them, I just can't say whether they were on scene or not. Still, I was under the impression that police existed to "Protect and Serve", and not (at the very least) dragging a critically injured man to a safe evacuation site doesn't really mesh with that. Maybe it was a triage foul-up.

Here's an article on it, although it's 3 years old:
http://www.policemag.com/channel/careers-training/articles/2013/08/a tf -s-tactical-medic-program.aspx
 
2013-11-16 01:11:37 PM  

mllawso: Ah, I may be mistaken. Apparently SRT "medics" just have to be EMT-Bs, although some do go the extra mile for the -P. Still, tactical medic's aren't rare anymore, and I know that LA has them, I just can't say whether they were on scene or not. Still, I was under the impression that police existed to "Protect and Serve", and not (at the very least) dragging a critically injured man to a safe evacuation site doesn't really mesh with that. Maybe it was a triage foul-up.


Based on some other sources I've read since they posted TFA, the officer in charge in the Terminal for LAPD was refusing to let anyone touch the guy because in his mind he was dead, and it was his crime scene. It was only after an Airport Police officer told him that he didn't have the authority to do that the EMS team was allowed inside.

Tactical EMTs are still relatively uncommon, at least in my area. A few of our tac guys went and got their EMT-Bs, but they're actual LE Officers.
 
2013-11-16 01:28:26 PM  
i.imgur.com

Something happened?
 
2013-11-16 01:55:56 PM  

change1211: Gig103: [img.fark.net image 604x358]

Yep, a father and husband is dead. This is a good thing because Fark doesn't like who he worked for.


Family got some great death benefits.  Dude should have thought of the risks before he took a job as professional scumbag.
 
2013-11-16 03:15:48 PM  

Maybe you should drive: CruiserTwelve: but I have personal experience with fire/rescue personnel refusing to enter a scene. In fact on several occasions that come to mind.

So do I.  There is nothing worse than screaming to your dispatcher that the EMTs and Fire are clear in, but they just won't come.  But it happens. A lot.


You've got a Tazer. Treat the EMT like a non compliant suspect. You do it often enough to civilians.

/The threat of 60,000 volts to the chest makes EMT's move like nothing else, because they are terrified of what defibrillators can do.
 
2013-11-16 03:20:21 PM  
These threads almost always turn in to a circle jerk brag off between HP and CT. Gets boring after reading a few of their "educational" posts. Have an ex- sister in law who is an EMT and her husband is a cop. That is some boring shiat. Problem is, they name names when they talk (brag) about calls that they have been on.

They should both be fired for privacy violations. Not HP or CT. I'm talking about the "outlaws".
 
2013-11-16 03:35:14 PM  

Gig103: [img.fark.net image 604x358]


Thanks for outing yourself as an asshole.

/No, TSA officers do not actually deserve death.
 
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